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Full text of "The Dabistan"

117

rnander of a district furnishing ten thousand men,
with an army of thirty thousand warriors, to re-
duce the sultan Jelal eddin,1 king of Kharazim, at
the time of the breaking up of the army, he said
to one of the Omras, who was subordinate to Jer-
maghiin : " The great affair of Jelal eddin in thy
" hand will sufficiently occupy thee." Finally, this
Amir, having fallen upon the Sultan Jelal-eddin in
Kurdistan, destroyed him completely. The libe-
rality and generosity of Oktayikan was as conspi-
cuous as the sun. When Tayir Bahdder, in the year
of the Hejira 625 (A. D. 1227) moved the army of
the Moghuls from Abtal to the country of Sistdn, they
besieged the fortArak; at that time the plague mani-
fested itself among the Moghuls, so that, at first, a
pain was felt in the mouth, then the teeth moved,
and on the third day death ensued. Malik Sdlakin,

1 Jangis Khan, during his terrific career, in the fourteenth year of
slaughter, devastation, and conquest, fell upon the empire of Kharism
and Ghazni. Muhammed of the Seljuks was driven from all his posses-
sions, and died a fugitive. He had before divided his empire between
his four sons, to one of whom Jelal eddin, he had assigned Kharizm,
Khorassan, Mazinderan, Ghazni, Bamian, Ghor, Bost Takanad, Zamigdand,
and all the Indian provinces. This prince, retiring before superior forces
towards Ghazni, gained two battles over the Moghuls, but was at last
obliged to fly to the banks of the Indus. There, closely pressed by the
enemies, who murdered his captive son seven years old before his eyes, he
threw his mother, wife, and the rest of his family, at their own desire,
into the water, and then swam, with a few followers, across the river,
before his admiring pursuers, who followed him no further.