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Full text of "The Dabistan"

159

SECTION II. Of their reputation.

SECTION III. Of the wise men, and of late philosophers, and of those
of that class who existed among all the nations of the children
of Adam, and still exist; named in Persian Zirek, and Farza-
nah; in Hindi Budhvan, Badisher, Set mat, Set pati, Kiani-
sher, Chater, Pah danter, and Jami; in Greek Filsofi; and
in Arabic Hakim.

SECTION I. —Or THE RELIGION OF THE PHILOSOPHERS,

AND OF SOME BRANCHES OF THEIR QUESTIONS.

The distinguished men of that class divide them-
selves into two sorts: the one are the Oriental, the
other the Occidental. As to the religious customs
of the Orientals, let it be known, that they are also
called Ravdkin, and in Persian Ke&hish, ** the reli-
** gious," Pertavi, " the splendent," and Roshendil,
" the enlightened," and in Hindi Ner mel men and
Jokisher: these names relate to sanctity. The Occi-
dentals are called in Persian Rah beri,£ c way-guides/'
and Joy a, inquirers;" in Hindi Tdrkek.

As to their tendency and opinions—whatever re-
lates to the creed of the Orientals has already been
stated in the chapter on the Jezddnidn, who are
also entitled Azarhoshangian, but all that is attri-
buted to the two sects is symbolical. The ancient
philosophers of Greece, down to Afldttim, (Plato), were
Oriental; it was Aras tu (Aristotle), his disciple, who
then took the lead in the doctrine, the centre of
which with this class is the argumentative reason.