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Full text of "The Dabistan"

25-4

* Is, according to the word of the prophet, to be accounted a Gue'ber.

'* In like manner as that Gue*ber said: ' Yezdan, Aherman,'
'* So was it as if that ignorant blockhead had said: ' He and me;'
" The actions have but a metaphorical connection with us,
" A connection with him in reality is a ludicrous play.
" How came it, 0 man without intelligence, that, from eternity,
" This man should be Muhammed, and the other Abu Jehel?"

It is written in the glorious Koran :

" If any thing good happens to them, they say: ' It comes from God;'
*' and if any thing bad, they say: * It comes from me;3 say: * Every
4< ' thing comes from God.' "

The Siifis say that the whole heaven is a body, the
first intelligence its soul, the breath of the whole his
heart, and the spirits of the seven planets, of the
fixed stars and the rest, are his power.

" Your creation and your resurrection are as those of one man."

The Shaikh Mohi eddin 1 says in his Fas hawdi,

according to Mirkhond, first a pagan, after having examined the sacred
books of all other nations, Jews and Christians, was vanquished by'Mo-
hammed's eloquence, and adopted his faith.

Another Jabr is Abu Mussa Jabr "Ben Hat i an al Sufi, author of the
book Kitab al Jafr, and of many other, some say five hundred, works
upon the philosopher's stone. He lived in the middle of the third cen-
tury of the Hejira (about A. D. 864).

A third Jabr, an Andalusian, is surnamed Shems-eddin.

1 Mohi-eddin, " he who makes religion revive and flourish," is a sur-
name borne by several Muselman doctors. The above-mentioned is Mohi-
eddin Ibn al Arabi, born in Kordua, in Spain, of an Arabian family,
called Tayt, in the year of the'Hejira 560 (A. D. 1164). He studied in
the academy of Seville, and then visited Asia Minor, Syria, and Egypt,
where he heard the most distinguished Shaikhs of his time. He became
the founder of a mystic school from which, among other remarkable
disciples, the great Maulana Jelal-eddin Rumi issued; he is'called " the