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Full text of "The Dabistan"

.heaven. The fifth is the hazerdt jdmdh,[ u the pre-
" sence of the Test/' and this is the universe in an
extensive, and mankind in a restricted, accepta-

tion. 2

The Siifis besides say: The world is life and intel-
lect, as far as the mineral kingdom ; but the mani-
festation of intellect in every body is determined by
the temperature of the human constitution. Some-
times bounty attains an excellence which is uttered
with ecstacy, and becomes a modulation more pow-
erful than that wiiich strikes the ear: and this is the

2 This is a very abstruse doctrine. To throw more light upon it,
I shall subjoin the explanation given by Jorjani upon this subject, accord-
ing to the French translation of SHvestre de Saoy (see Not. et Ext. de$
MSS., vol. X. p. 66): " The five divine .presences are: 1. the presence of
the absolute absence (or mystery]; its world is the world of the fixed sub-
stances in the scientific presence (see pp. 223, 224, note 2). To the pre-
sence of the absolute mystery is opposed:2. the presence of the absolute
assistance; its world is that named Aalem al mulk (that is, the world of
the throne or seat of God, of the four elemental natures); 3. the presence
of the relative absence; this is divided into two parts: the one, 3. nearer-
the presence of the absolute mystery.; the world of which is that of spi-
rits, which belong to what is called jabrut and malkut, that is, of intelli-
gences and of bare souls; the other: 4. nearer the presence of the abso-
lute assistance; and the world of which is that of models "(images),
called Aalem al mulkut; 5. the presence which comprises the four pre-
ceding ones; and its world is the world of mankind, a world which re-
unites all the worlds, and all they contain." This statement differs some-
what from that of our text; to exhibit and to develop, in all their varia-
tions, the systems of Stifism is far beyond the compass of these notes, and
would require a separate work.