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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

1670                             JOHN  EVELYN

It has a river by it, a pretty avenue of limes, and in a
park.

This is in Saffron Walden parish, famous for that use-
ful plant, with which all the country is covered.

Dining at Bishop Stortford, we came late to London.

5th August, 1670. There was sent me by a neighbor a
servant maid, who, in the last month, as she was sitting
before her mistress at work, felt a stroke on her arm a
little above the wrist for some height, the smart of
which, as if struck by another hand, caused her to hold
her arm awhile till somewhat mitigated; but it put her
into a kind of convulsion, or rather hysteric fit. A
gentleman coming casually in, looking on her arm, found
that part powdered with red crosses, set in most exact
and wonderful order, neither swelled nor depressed,
about this shape

not seeming to be any way made by artifice, of a reddish
color, not so red as blood, the skin over them smooth,
the rest of the arm livid and of a mortified hue, with
certain prints, as it were, of the stroke of fingers. This
had happened three several times in July, at about ten
days' interval, the crosses beginning to wear out, but
the successive ones set in -other different, yet uniform
order The maid seemed very modest, and came from
London to Deptford with her mistress, to avoid the dis-
course and importunity of curious people. She made no
gain by it, pretended no religious fancies; but seemed
to be a plain, ordinary, silent, working wench, some-
what fat, short, and high-colored. She told me divers
divines and physicians had seen her, but were unsatisfied;
that she had taken some remedies against her fits, but
they did her no good; she had never before had any
fits; once since, she seemed in her sleep to hear one say
to her that she should tamper no more with them, nor
trouble herself with anything that happened, but put her
trust in the merits of Christ only.

This is the substance of what she told me, and what I
•saw and curiously examined.    I was formerly acquaintedreturned from Burrow Green to