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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY   OF                              ROCHESTER

2tst March, 1672. I visited the coasts in my district
of Kent, and divers wounded and languishing poor men,
that had been in the Smyrna conflict. I went over to see
the new-begun Fort of Tilbury; a royal work, indeed,
and such as will one day bridle a great city to the pur-
pose, before they are aware.

23d March, ^672. Captain Cox, one of the Commis-
sioners of the Navy, furnishing me with a yatch, I sailed
to Sheerness to see that fort also, now newly finished;
several places on both sides the Swale and Medway to
Gillingham and Upnore, being also provided with re-
doubts and batteries to secure the station of our men-of-
war at Chatham, and shut the door when the steeds
were stolen.

24th March, 1672. I saw the chirurgeon cut off the
leg of a wounded sailor, the stout and gallant man en-
during it with incredible patience, without being bound
to his chair, as usual on such painful occasions. I had
hardly courage enough to be present. Not being cut off
high enough the gangrene prevailed, and the second
operation cost the poor creature his life.

Lord! what miseries are mortal men subject to, and
what confusion and mischief do the avarice, anger, and
ambition of Princes, cause in the world!

25th March, 1672. I proceeded to Canterbury, Dover,
Deal, the Isle of Thanet, by Sandwich, and so to Margate.
Here we had abundance of miserably wounded men, his
Majesty sending his chief chirurgeon, Sergeant Knight, to
meet me, and Dr. Waldrond had attended me all the
journey. Having taken order for the accommodation of
the wounded, I came back through a country the best
cultivated of any that in my life I had anywhere seen,
every field lying as even as a bowling-green, and the
fences, plantations, and husbandry, in such admirable
order, as infinitely delighted me, after the sad and afflict-
ing spectacles and objects I was come from. Observing
almost every tall tree to have a weathercock on the top
bough, and some trees half-a-dozen, I learned that, on a
certain holyday, the farmers feast their servants; at
which solemnity, they set up these cocks, in a kind of
triumph.

Being come back toward Rochester, I went to take order
respecting the building a strong and high wall about anerated innumerable gallant