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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

1676-77                       JOHN EVELYN

*9th August, 1677. Dined at the Earl of Peterborough's
the day after the marriage of my Lord of Arundel to
Lady Mary Mordaunt, daughter of the Earl of Peter-
borough.

28th August, 1677. To visit my Lord Chamberlain, in
Suffolk; he sent his coach and six to meet and bring
me from St. Edmund's Bury to Euston.

29th August, 1677. We hunted in the Park and killed a
very fat buck.

3ist August,  1677.    I went a hawking.

4th September, 1677. I went to visit my Lord Crofts,
now dying at St. Edmunds Bury, and took the oppor-
tunity to see this ancient town, and the remains of that
famous monastery and abbey. There is little standing
entire, save the gatehouse; it has been a vast and mag-
nificent Gothic structure, and of great extent. The gates
are wood, but quite plated over with iron. There are
also two stately churches, one especially.

5th September, 1677. I went to Thetford, to the
borough-town, where stand the ruins of a religious house:
there is a round mountain artificially raised, either for
some castle, or monument, which makes a pretty land-
scape. As we went and returned, a tumbler showed his
extraordinary address in the Warren. I also saw the
Decoy; much pleased with the stratagem.

7th September, 1677. There dined this day at my
Lord's one Sir John Gaudy, a very handsome person,
but quite dumb, yet very intelligent by signs, and a
very fine painter; he was so civil and well bred, as it
was not possible to discern any imperfection in him.
His lady and children were also there, and he was at
church in the morning with us.

9th September, 1677. A stranger preached at Euston
Church, and fell into a handsome panegyric on my Lord's
new building the church, which indeed for its elegance
and cheerfulness, is one of the prettiest country churches
in England. My Lord told me his heart smote him that,
after he had bestowed so much on his magnificent palace
there, he should see God's House in the ruin it lay in.
He has also rebuilt the parsonage-house, all of stone,
very neat and ample.

loth September, 1677. To divert me, my Lord would
needs carry me to see Ipswich, when we dined with oneon, in so great a snow,