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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

166                                   DIARY OF                              LONDON

as hot as I could endure it: and sitting so in it in a deep
churn, or vessel, covered with blankets, and drinking
cardiius posset, then going to bed and sweating, I not
only missed that expected fit, but had no more, only
continued weak, that I could not go to church till Ash
Wednesday, which I had not missed, I think, so long in
twenty years, so gracious had God been to me.

After this warning and admonition, I now began to
look over and methodize all my writings, accounts, letters,
papers; inventoried the goods, and other articles of the
house, and put things into the best order I could, and
made my will; that now, growing in years, I might
have none of these secular things and concerns to
distract me, when it should please Almighty God to call
me from this transitory life. With this, I prepared
some special meditations and devotions for the time of
sickness. The Lord Jesus grant them to be salutary for
my poor soul in that day, that I may obtain mercy and
acceptance!

ist March, 1682. My second grandchild was born,
and christened the next day by our vicar at Sayes
Court, by the name of John.* I beseech God to bless
him!

2d March, 1682. ASH WEDNESDAY. I went to church:
our vicar preached on Proverbs, showing what care and
vigilance was required for the keeping of the heart up-
right. The Holy Communion followed, on which I gave
God thanks for his gracious dealing with me in my
late sickness, and affording me this blessed opportunity
of praising him in the congregation, and receiving the
cup of salvation with new and serious resolutions.

Came to see and congratulate my recovery, Sir John
Lowther, Mr. Herbert, Mr. Pepys, Sir Anthony Deane,
and Mr. Hill

loth March, 1682. This day was executed Colonel
Vrats, and some of his accomplices, for the execrable
murder of Mr Thynn, set on by the principal Konings-
mark. He went to execution like an Undaunted hero, as
one that had done a friendly office for that base coward,
Count Koningsmark, who had hopes to marry his widow,
the rich Lady Ogle, and was acquitted by a corrupt jury,
and so got away. Vrats told a friend of mine who
* Who became Ms successor, and was created a baronet in 1713.ing of Mon-