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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

170

DIARY  OF                             LONDON

of a dull and heavy constitution, not wondering at any
thing they saw; but exceedingly astonished how our law
gave us propriety in our estates, and so thinking we were
all kings, for they could not be made to comprehend
how subjects could possess anything but at the pleasure
of their Prince, they being all slaves; they were pleased
with the notion, and admired our happiness. They were
very sober, and I believe subtle in their way. Their
meat was cooked, carried up, and they attended by
several fat slaves, who had no covering save drawers,
which appeared very uncouth and loathsome. They ate
their pilaw, and other spoon-meat, without spoons, taking
up their pottage in the hollow of their fingers, and very
dexterously flung it into their mouths without spilling
a drop.

iyth July, 1682. Came to dine with me, the Duke of
Graf ton and the young Earl of Ossory, son to my most
dear deceased friend.

3oth July, 1682. Went to visit our good neighbor, Mr.
Bohun, whose whole house is a cabinet of all elegancies,
especially Indian; in the hall are contrivances of Japan
screens, instead of wainscot; and there is an excellent
pendule clock inclosed in the curious flowerwork of Mr.
Gibbons, in the middle of the vestibule. The landscapes
of the screens represent the manner of living, and country
of the Chinese. But, above all, his lady's cabinet is
adorned on the fret, ceiling, and chimney-piece, with
Mr. Gibbons's best carving. There are also some of
Streeter's best paintings, and many rich curiosities of
gold and silver as growing in the mines. The gardens
are exactly kept, and the whole place very agreeable and
well watered. The owners .are good neighbors, and Mr.
Bohun has also built and endowed a hospital for eight
poor people, with a pretty chapel, and every necessary
accommodation.

ist August, 1682. To the Bishop of London at Fulham,
to review the additions which Mr. Marshall had made to
his curious book of flowers in miniature, and collection
of insects.

4tt August, 1682.    With Sir Stephen   Fox,  to survey

the foundations of the Royal Hospital begun, at Chelsea.

9th August, 1682.    The Council of the  Royal Society

had it recommended to them to be trustees and visitors,en turned Mahometans not above fifty years since; the