(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY OF         ,                 LONDON

narily handsome and well shaped. What the Dukes of
Richmond and St. Alban's will prove, their youth does
not yet discover; they are very pretty boys.

26th October, 1684. Dr. Goodman preached before the
King on James ii. 12, concerning the law of liberty: an
excellent discourse and in good method. He is author
of ((The Prodigal Son,^ a treatise worth reading, and
another of the old religion.

2yth October, 1684. I visited the Lord Chamberlain,
where dined the BLACK BARON and Monsieur Flamerin,
who had so long been banished from France for a duel.

28th October, 1684. I carried Lord Clarendon through
the city amid all the squibs and bacchanalia of the Lord
Mayor's show, to the Royal Society, where he was pro-
posed a member; and then treated him at dinner.

I went to St. Clement's, that prettily built and contrived
church where a young divine gave us an eloquent ser-
mon on i Cor. vi. 20, inciting to gratitude and glorify-
ing God for the fabric of our bodies and the dignity of
our nature.

2d November, 1684. A sudden change from temperate
warm weather to an excessive cold rain, frost, snow, and
storm, such as had seldom been known. This winter
weather began as early and fierce as the past did late;
till about Christmas there then had been hardly any
winter.

4th November, 1684. Dr. Turner, now translated from
Rochester to Ely upon the death of Dr. Peter Gunning,
preached before the King at Whitehall on Romans iii. 8,
a very excellent sermon, vindicating the Church of Eng-
land against the pernicious doctrines of the Church of
Rome. He challenged the producing but of five clergy-
men who forsook our Church and went over to that of
Rome, during all the troubles and rebellion in England,
which lasted near twenty years; and this was to my cer-
tain observation a great truth.

15th November, 1684. Being the Queen's birthday,
there were fireworks on the Thames before Whitehall,
with pageants of castles, forts, and other devices of gir-
andolas, serpents, the King and Queen's arms and mot-
toes, all represented in fire, such as had not been seen
here. But the most remarkable was the several fires and
skirmishes in the very water, which actually moved ae King at Windsor soon after, the King took a ring