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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

JOHN EVELYN

shire, and of his having set tip his standard as King of
England. I pray God deliver us from the confusion
Which these beginnings threaten!

Such a dearth for want of rain was never in my
memory.

iyth June, 1685. The Duke landed with but 150 men;
but the whole kingdom was alarmed, fearing that the
disaffected would join them, many of the trained bands
flocking to him. At his landing, he published a Declar-
ation, charging his Majesty with usurpation and several
horrid crimes, on pretense of his own title, and offering
to call a free Parliament. This declaration was ordered
to be burnt by the hangman, the Duke proclaimed a
traitor, and a reward of 5,000 to any who should kill
him.

At this time, the words engraved on the monument in
London, intimating that the Papists fired the city, were
erased and cut out.

The exceeding drought still continues.

18th June, 1685. I received a warrant to send out a
horse with twelve days' provisions, etc.

28th June, 1685. We had now plentiful rain after two
years' excessive drought and severe winters.

Argyle taken in Scotland, and executed, and his party
dispersed.

sd July, 1685. No considerable account of the troops
sent against the Duke, though great forces sent There
was a smart skirmish; but he would not be provoked to
come to an encounter, but still kept in the fastnesses.

Dangerfield whipped, like Gates, for perjury.

8th July, 1685. Came news of Monmouth's utter de-
feat, and the next day of his being taken by Sir William
Portman and Lord Lumley with the militia of their
counties. It seems the Horse, commanded by Lord
Grey, being newly raised and undisciplined, were not to
be brought in so short a time to endure the fire, which
exposed the Foot to the King's, so as when Monmouth
had led the Foot in great silence and order, thinking to
surprise Lieutenant-General Lord Feversham newly en-
camped, and given him a smart charge, interchanging
both great and small shot, the Horse, breaking their own
ranks, Monmouth gave it over, and fled with Grey, leav-
ing their party to be cut in pieces to the number ofarge. I brought