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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

JOHN  EVELYN

and his Majesty, who was all the while in his bedchamber,
ordered him to be carried to the Greencloth officer, who
sent him to the Marshalsea, as he deserved. My Lord
Devon had nothing said to him.

I supped this night at Lambeth at my old friend's Mr.
Elias Ashmole's, with my Lady Clarendon, the Bishop of
St. Asaph, and Dr. Tenison, when we were treated at a
great feast.

roth July, 1685. The Count of Castel Mellor, that
great favorite and prime minister of Alphonso, late King
of Portugal, after several years' banishment, being now
received to grace and called home by Don Pedro, the
present King, as having been found a person of the
greatest integrity after all his sufferings, desired me to
spend part of this day with, him, and assist him in a col-
lection of books and other curiosities, which he would
carry with him into Portugal.

Mr. Hussey, a young gentleman who made love to my
late dear child, but whom she could not bring herself to
answer in affection, died now of the same cruel disease,
for which I was extremely sorry, because he never en-
joyed himself after my daughter's decease, nor was I
averse to the match, could she have overcome her disin-
clination.

15th July, 1685. I went to see Dr. Tenison's library
[in St. Martin's].

Monmouth was this day brought to London and ex-
amined before the King, to whom he made great sub-
mission, acknowledged his seduction by Ferguson, the
Scot, whom he named the bloody villain. He was sent
to the Tower, had an interview with his late Duchess,
whom he received coldly, having lived dishonestly with
the Lady Henrietta Wentworth for two years. He ob-
stinately asserted his conversation with that debauched
woman to be no sin; whereupon, seeing he could not be
persuaded to his last breath, the divines who were sent
to assist him thought not fit to administer the Holy Com-
munion to him. For the rest of his faults he professed
great sorrow, and so died without any apparent fear. He
would not make use of a cap or other circumstance, but
lying down, bid the fellow to do his office better than to
the late Lord Russell, and gave him gold; but the wretch
made five chops before he had his head off; which so told him he lied; on which Culpeper