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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

JOHN EVELYN

11 the Choristian professions on the earth, the most
tlrnitive, apostolical, and excellent.

8th October, 1685. I had mY picture drawn this week
7 the famous Kneller.

14th Octo~ber, 1685. I went to London about finishing
iy lodgings at Whitehall.

15th October, 1685. Being the King's birthday, there
ras a soleirm ball at Court, and before it music of in-
truments axid voices. I happened by accident to stand
tie very ne:xt to the Queen and the King, who talked
rith me about the music.

x8th Octo"ber, 1685. The King was now building all
txat range from east to west by the court and garden to
tie street, and making1 a new chapel for the Queen,
/•hose lodgixig-s -were to be in this new building, as also

new Council chamber and offices next the south end
f the banqueting house. I returned home, next morn-
ig, to London.

22d October,   1685.    I accompanied my Lady Clarendon

0    her   hoixse   at   Swallowfield, in Berks, dining by the
^a.y at Mr.   Graham's lodge at Bagshot; the house, newly
epaired and capacious enough for a good family, stands
a  a park.

Hence, we -went to Swallowfield; this house is after the
Lticient building- of honorable gentlemen's houses, when
hey kept -up ancient hospitality, but the gardens and
va.ters as elegant as it is possible to make a flat by
irt and industry, and no mean expense, my lady being
\o extraordinarily skilled in the flowery part, and my lord
11 diligence of planting; so that I have hardly seen a
jeat -which shows more tokens of it than what is to be
:cmnd here, not only in the delicious and rarest fruits of

1  garden,   t»nt in those   innumerable  timber trees in the
ground abo~ut the seat, to the greatest ornament and bene-
fit  of the place.     There is  one  orchard of  1,000 golden,
and other cider pippins; walks and groves of elms, limes,
3a,ks,   and other trees.    The garden  is so beset with all
manner of   sweet shrubs, that it perfumes the air.    The
distribution also of the quarters, walks, and parterres, is
excellent.      The nurseries, kitchen-garden full of the most
desirable plants ; two very noble orangeries well furnished:
but,  above   all, the canal and fish ponds, the one fed with
a -white,  tlie other with a black running water, fed by an the