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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY OF                            LONDON

his father, that he dared not let anything appear of his
sentiments; that he hated letters and priests, spent all
his time in hunting, and seemed to take no notice of
what was passing.

This lady was of a great family and fortune, and had
fled hither for refuge.

8th July, 1686. I waited on the Archbishop at Lam-
beth, where I dined and met the famous preacher and
writer, Dr. Allix, doubtless a most excellent and learned
person. The Archbishop and he spoke Latin together,
and that very readily.

nth July, 1686. Dr. Meggot, Dean of Winchester
preached before the household in St. George's Chapel at
Windsor, the late King's glorious chapel now seized on
by the mass priests. Dr. Cartwright, Dean of Ripon,
preached before the great men of the Court in the same
place.

We had now the sad news of the Bishop of Oxford's
death, an extraordinary loss to the poor Church at this
time. Many candidates for his Bishopric and Deanery,
Dr. Parker, South, Aldrich, etc. Dr. Walker (now apos-
tatizing) came to Court, and was doubtless very busy.

i3th July, 1686. Note, that standing by the Queen at
basset (cards), I observed that she was exceedingly con-
cerned for the loss of ^80; her outward affability much
changed to stateliness, since she has been exalted.

The season very rainy and inconvenient for the camps.
His Majesty very cheerful.

14th July, 1686. Was sealed at our office the con-
stitution of certain commissioners to take upon them full
power of all Ecclesiastical affairs, in as unlimited a man-
ner, or rather greater, than the late High Commission-
Court, abrogated by Parliament; for it had not only
faculty to inspect and visit all Bishops' dioceses, but to
change what laws and statutes they should think fit to
alter among the colleges, though founded by private
men; to punish, suspend, fine, etc., give oaths and call
witnesses. The main drift was to suppress zealous preach-
ers. In sum, it was the whole power of a Vicar-General
•—note the consequence! Of the clergy the commission-
ers were the Archbishop of Canterbury [Bancroft], Bishop
of Durham [Crewe], and Rochester [Sprat]; of the Tem-
porals, the Lord Treasurer, the Lord Chancellor [Jefferies]
of talk a§ the Qamp, especially nineteen new Privy-Coun-hop of Londonhe orthodox in all