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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY   OP                             LONDON

up two or three free schools at his own charges. Besides
this, he was of an exemplary, holy life, took great pains
in constantly preaching, and incessantly employing him-
self to promote the service of God botji in public and
private. I never knew a man of a more universal and
generous spirit, with so much modesty, prudence, and
piety.

The great victory of King William's army in Ireland
was looked on as decisive of that war. The French
General, St. Ruth, who had been so cruel to the poor
Protestants in France, was slain, with divers of the best
commanders; nor was it cheap to us, having 1,000 killed,
but of the enemy 4,000 or 5,000.

26th July, 1691. An extraordinary hot season, yet
refreshed by some thundershowers.

28th July, 1691.    I went to Wotton.

2d August, 1691. No sermon in the church in the after-
noon, and the curacy ill-served.

16th August, 1691. A sermon by the curate; an honest
discourse, but read without any spirit, or seeming con-
cern; a great fault in the education of young preachers.
Great thunder and lightning on Thursday, but the rain
and wind very violent. Our fleet come in to lay up the
great ships; nothing done at sea, pretending that we
cannot meet the French.

13th September, 1691. A great storm at sea; we lost
the "Coronation'* and ^Harwich,>} above 600 men perishing.

i4th October, 1691. A most pleasing autumn. Our
navy come in without having performed anything, yet
there has been great loss of ships by negligence, and
unskillful men governing the fleet and Navy board.

7th November, 1691. I visited the Earl of Dover, who
having made his peace with the King, was now come
home. The relation he gave of the strength of the
French King, and the difficulty of our forcing him to
fight, and any way making impression into France, was
very wide from what we fancied.

8th to 3oth November, 1691. An extraordinary dry and
warm season, without frost, and like a new spring; such
as had not been known for many years. Part of the
King's house at Kensington was burned.

6th December, 1691. Discourse of another PLOT, in which
several great persons were named, but believed to be ang the best editions of useful books,