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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY OF                         LONDON

Privy Council, and one to his daughter, the Queen
Regent, informing them of the Queen being ready to
be brought to bed, and summoning them to be at the
birth by the middle of May, promising as from the
French King, permission to come and return in safety.

24th April, 1692. Much apprehension of a French
invasion, and of an universal rising. Our fleet begins to
join with the Dutch. Unkindness between the Queen
and her sister. Very cold and unseasonable weather,
scarce a leaf on the trees.

5th May, 1692. Reports of an invasion were very
hot, and alarmed the city, Court, and people; nothing
but securing suspected persons, sending forces to the
seaside, and hastening out the fleet. Continued dis-
course of the French invasion, and of ours in France.
The eastern wind so constantly blowing, gave our fleet
time to unite, which had been so tardy in preparation,
that, had not God thus wonderfully favored, the enemy
would in all probability have fallen upon us. Many
daily secured, and proclamations out for more con-
spirators.

8th May, 1692. My kinsman, Sir Edward Evelyn, of
Long Ditton, died suddenly.

12th May,  1692.    A fast.

13th May, 1692. I dined at my cousin Cheny's, son to
my Lord Cheny, who married my cousin Pierpoint.

i5th May, 1692. My niece, M. Evelyn, was now mar-
ried to Sir Cyril Wyche, Secretary of State for Ireland.
After all our apprehensions of being invaded, and
doubts of our success by sea, it pleased God to give us
a great naval victory, to the utter ruin of the French
fleet, their admiral and all their best men-of-war, trans-
port-ships, etc.

29th May, 1692. Though this day was set apart
expressly for celebrating the memorable birth, return,
and restoration of the late King Charles II., there was
no notice taken of it, nor any part of the office annexed
to the Common Prayer Book made use of, which I
think was ill done, in regard his restoration not only
redeemed us from anarchy and confusion, but restored
the Church of England as it were miraculously.

9th June, 1692. I went to "Windsor to carry my grand-
son to Eton School, where I met my Lady Stonehouseen and directed   by his own hand to several of the