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Full text of "The Diary Of John Evelyn Vol-2"

DIARY  OF                           LONDON

ingenious. I went also to see the building beginning
near St. Giles's, where seven streets make a star from a
Doric pillar placed in the middle of a circular area; said
to be built by Mr. Neale, introducer of the late lotteries,
in imitation of those at Venice, now set up here, for
himself twice, and now one for the State.

28th October, 1694. Mr. Stringfellow preached at Trinity
church.

22d November, 1694. Visited the Bishop of Lincoln
[Tenison] newly come on the death of the Archbishop of
Canterbury, who a few days before had a paralytic
stroke,—the same day and month that Archbishop San-
croft was put out. A very sickly time, especially the
smallpox, of which divers considerable persons died.
The State lottery* drawing, Mr. Cock, a French refu-
gee, and a President in the Parliament of Paris for the
Reformed, drew a lot of ^1,000 per annum.

29th November, 1694. I visited the Marquis of Nor-
manby, and had much discourse concerning King Charles
II. being poisoned. Also concerning the quinqmna which
the physicians would not give to the King, at a time
when, in a dangerous ague, it was the only thing that
could cure him (out of envy because it had been brought
into vogue by Mr. Tudor, an apothecary), till Dr. Short,
to whom the King sent to know his opinion of it privately,
he being reputed a Papist (but who was in truth a very
honest, good Christian), sent word to the King that
it was the only thing which could save his life, and then
the King enjoined his physicians to give it to him, which
they did and he recovered. Being asked by this Lord
why they would not prescribe it, Dr. Lower said it
would spoil their practice, or some such expression, and
at last confessed it was a remedy fit only for kings.
Exception was taken that the late Archbishop did not
cause any of his Chaplains to use any office for the sick
during his illness.

9th December, 1694. I had news that my dear and
worthy friend, Dr. Tenison, Bishop of Lincoln, was made
Archbishop of Canterbury, for which I thank God and
rejoice, he being most worthy of it, for his learning,
piety, and prudence.

13th December, 1694.    I went to London to congratu-

* State lotteries finally closed October 18, 1826., isof Denton,  in very year 1694; it