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Full text of "The Discovery Of The Child"

70                THE DISCOVERY OF THE CHILD

The spaces relating to every number serve for registering the
name of the child born on any day of the month. Thus the teacher
knows what pupils she ought to measure on a particular day of
the calendar, and she writes down her measurements in correspond-
ence with the month. In this way the most accurate registration
is secured without the teacher being aware of it in the sense
that she does not feel the work and fatigue of it to any great
degree.

/As for weight, I planned that it should be taken every
week by means of a weighing machine placed in the dressing-room
adjoining the bathroom. Choosing the day of the week on which
he was born, the child is weighed; this is done when he is
undressed, previous to his bath. In this way the bathing of the
children (perhaps 50 of them) is spread out over seven days, and
about three to five children come to the bath every day.t In
practice, the weekly bath presents no few difficulties, and it is often

necessary to make this theoretical.   In any case, I planned the

weekly weighing in the manner specified with the intention of

regulating and making sure of weekly baths also.

The registration of weight is made very simple.   There are

set out in a register the days of the week in a vertical column, and

corresponding to each one are drawn lines intended for the

names of the pupils born on that day.

I am of the opinion that these are the only anthropological

measurements with which the mistress need concern herself and

are the only ones which directly affect the school.

I planned that the other measurements should be taken by a

doctor who had specialized in child anthropology, or who intended

to specialize in this branch of pedagogic anthropology.   In the

meantime, I myself undertook these duties.

The work of the doctor is bound to be complicated and to

make the arrangement of it easier, I had printed biographical

forms, specimens of which I reproduce here: