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Full text of "The Discovery Of The Child"

180               THE DISCOVERY OF THE CHILD -

cardboard or of wood. It consists essentially of a box; the six
trays or drawers, resting on small side supports, will each hold six
plaques. In the first tray are placed six triangles; in the
second, a square and five rectangles of the same height and
decreasing in breadth; in the third, six polygons from the pentagon
to the decagon; in the fourth, six circles decreasing in diameter;
in the fifth, two plain plaques, and a rhombus, a rhomboid,
a trapezium and a trapezoid; in the sixth, various curved figures
such as the ellipse, the oval, a floral design (four crossed arches)
and a curved triangle and two plain plaques.

THE THREE SERIES OF CARDS

To this material are added several white square cards of
14 cms, side. On one series of these is printed a geometrical
figure of the same blue colour as the inset pieces, embracing in
dimensions and shape all the geometrical figures of the collection.
On a second series of similar cards are printed, in outline,
also in blue, the same geometrical figures, the outline being 1 cm.
thick. On a third series of similar cards, is printed with a
thin blue line the outlines reproducing the same figures in dimen-
sions and shape. This idea is to be found in Seguin. The material
comprises the frame, the collection of plane figures and the three
sets of form cards.

Exercise with the insets. This consists in presenting to the
child the frame with various figures, taking out the pieces, spread-
ing them out, mixing them up on the table and inviting the child
to restore them to their places.

This game is suitable for children even below the age of three,
and keeps the child's attention for a long time, though not for so
long as the solid insets. I have never seen the exercise repeated
here more than five or sk times in succession.

The child devotes a great deal of energy to this exercise. He
has to recognize the shape and give it a lengthy examination. At
first many succeed only after repeated attempts to embed the