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Full text of "The Discovery Of The Child"

H          A          P          T          E          R       XVIII

THE SPEECH OF THE CHILD

WRITTEN language, which includes dictation and reading, involves
articulate language in its complete mechanism (auditory, central
and motor paths), and, in the way of development encouraged by
my method, is based essentially on articulate language.

Written language may, therefore, be considered from two points
of view:

(a)  That of the mastery of a new language of great social
importance which is added to the spoken language of the natural
man.   This is the cultural meaning which is usually attached to
written language, which is, therefore, taught in schools without any
regard for its relationships with spoken language, and only with
the intention of offering to social man a means necessary for
making contacts with the environment.

(b)  That of the connection between written and spoken lan-
guage, and the eventual possibility of using written language to
improve spoken language—a new consideration on which I must
insist and one which gives to written language physiological and
psychological importance.

Besides,  as spoken language is a natural function of man,,
and is also the means which he uses for social purposes, so this