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THE TEACHING OF NUMERATION             335

0
	0     0
	o
	o
	o
	0
	o
	0

X
	XX   XX
	X X
	XX
	XX
	X X
	XX
	X X


	X
	X X
	X X
	XX
	X X
	XX
	X X


	
	
	X
	XX
	XX
	X X
	X X


	
	
	
	
	X
	XX
	XX


	
	
	
	
	
	
	X

The numbers are represented by crosses; in the place indicated
by the small circle the child must place the folded ticket. That
done, he waits for his work to be inspected. The teacher comes,,
opens the paper, reads and utters exclamations of pleasure and
praise when she declares that there are no mistakes.

At the beginning of the game it often happens that the children
take more objects than are required to match the number; that i&
not really because they do not remember the figure, but owing to
their craving to possess more things. It is a little instinctive weak-
ness which is common to primitive and untaught man. The
teacher tries to explain to the children that it is useless to have too
many things on the table, and that the only beauty of the game-
lies in their guessing the exact number of the objects.

Little by little they grasp this idea, but not as easily as one:
might imagine.

It is real exercise in self-control, one which keeps the child
within prescribed limits; it makes him take, for example, only two
of the things which are piled up at his disposal whilst he sees some
of his companions taking more..

I therefore consider this game to be more of an exercise in
will-power than an exercise in numbers.

The child who draws zero does not move from his place, while-
he sees all those others who possess tickets getting up, moving
about, taking things freely from that far-away heap from which
he is debarred. Very often zero falls to a child who can count
readily, and who would also be delighted to put together a fine
group of objects and set them out in the required order on the
table, afterwards to wait with confident pride for the inspection.