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Full text of "The Dynasts : Parts First And Second"

SCENE IV
PART FIRST
FOURTH SPECTATOR
He's a very obstinate and comical old gentleman ; and by all account 'a wouldn't make port when asked to.
SECOND SPECTATOR
Lard, Lard, if 'a were nabbed, it wouldn't make a deal of difference! We should have nobody to zing to, and play singlestick to, and grin at through horse-collars, that's true. And nobody to sign our few documents. But we should rub along some way, goodnow.
FIRST SPECTATOR
Step up on this barrow ; you can see better. The troopers now passing are the York Hussars — foreigners to a man, except the officers—the same regiment the two young Germans belonged to who were shot here four years ago. Now come the Light Dragoons; what a time they take to get all past! See, the King turns to speak to one of his notables. Well, well! this day will be recorded in history.
SECOND SPECTATOR
Or another soon to follow it! (He gazes over the Channel) There's not a speck of an enemy upon that shiny water yet; but the Brest fleet is zaid to have put to sea, to act in concert with the army crossing from Boulogne ; and if so the French will soon be here; when God save us all! IVe took to drinking neat, for, says I, one may as well have his innerds burnt out as shot out, and Jtis a good deal pleasanter for the man that owns 'em. They say that a cannon-ball knocked poor Jim Popple's maw right up into the futtock-shrouds at the Nile, where 'a hung like a nightcap out to dry. Much good to him his obeying his old mother's wish and refusing his allowance o' rum!
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