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Full text of "The Egyptian Problem"

302
THE EGYPTIAN PROBLEM
CHAP.
t i •
together, namely, partnership between its members for common defence and freedom to each to develop constitutionally on its own individual lines.- The policy of association, not domination, has prevailed continuously in the relations between Britain and the great Dominions built up mainly by men of our own British stock. It prevailed in the South African settlement when It was applied for the first time to bring together two peoples who, though bothjjf European stock, had been driven into collision by the conflict of different national tqjnpera-ments and traditions. It is being applied now for the first time to the relations between Britain and the greatest of her Oriental dependencies, whose people are infinitely more remote from our own by race, religion, and civilisation. That Britain means to apply it to Egypt should be clear enough even from the terms of the Declaration which Lord Allenby brought out from London last autumn. That Declaration contained the essential promise of autonomy and self-government—a promise we are hound to keep, even though it did not satisfy the; demands of the Party of Independence, and it came too late to dispel the atmosphere of wild suspicion and resentment which many unfortunate happenings before, during, and after the war had created, by no means amongst the politically-minded classes alone.
Until it has been followed up by definite and tangible proposals for giving effect to it, such as will, one may hope, be contained in the recommendations of the Alilner Commission, we have nothing substantial to set against. the raging and tearing propaganda of the Party of Independence, and the Egyptians will continue to treat our assurances that all shall come in good time with just an much impatience as we treat the assertions of the Nationalists that nothing will satisfy Egypt but "' complete independence." What makes Englishmen who sympathise with many Egyptian grievances despair of the Nationalist leaders is that not one of them has hitherto been found to explain what constructive policy theytieH established in Egypt who look to us for the protection of their