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Full text of "The end of the war in the Pacific"

THE END 

OF THE WAR 

IN THE PACIFIC 

Surrender 

Documents in 

Facsimile 




JUN 17 154? 
S. M. U. LiSRARt 











THE END OF THE WAR 
IN THE PACIFIC 

SURRENDER DOCUMENTS 
IN FACSIMILE 

The National •^Archives 







1 



NATIONAL ARCHIVES PUBLICATION 
NO. 46-6 



United States Government Printing Office, Washington, 1945 



/■'or sail by Ihe Supirintindent of Documents, GovernmeJit Piinling i 
Washington 25, D. C. Price (paper) 30 ctnts 




General Jonathan M, Wainwrjuht OptNiNG the Exhibition of the Japanese Si^'Rrender Documents 
Beside! the guard of honor, from left to right, are Thad Page, Administrative Secretary of the National Archives, Solon J. Buck, Archivist of the 
United Slates, General Wainwright, and Sam Raybum, Speaker of the House of Representatives. 



p 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

The end of the war in the Pacific 1 

Radio script of the ceremonies opening the exhibit of the Japanese 

surrender documents 3 

Facsimiles of the documents 7 

Foreign, Minister Shigemitsu's credentials authorizing him to 

sign the instrument of surrender at Tokyo Bay 8 

Translation of Foreign Minister Shigemitsu's credentials .... 9 

General Umezu's credentials authorizing him to sign the instru- 
ment of surrender at Tokyo Bay iO 

Translation of General Umezu's credentials 11 

Instrument of surrender signed at Tokyo Bay 12 

Emperor Hirohito's rescript announcing the surrender and 
ordering the people to carry out the provisions of the instru- 
ment of surrender 14 

Translation of Emperor Hirohito's rescript 16 

Instrument of surrenderor Japanese forces in the Philippines . . 17 

Instrumentof surrenderof JapaneseforcesinsouthernKorea . . 19 

Instrument of surrender of Japanese forces in South East Asia . 24 



r 



The End of the War in the Pacific 



A BOARD the battleship Missouri, anchored 
/-\ in Tokyo Bay, General Douglas Mac- 
■^ -*- Arthur, Supreme Commander for the 
.■\llied Powers, accepted the capitulation of the 
Japanese by signing the instrument of surrender. 
That was at 0908 hours on Sunday the second 
day of September 1945. The mighty machine 
of war had already rolled to a stop, but the formal 
surrender marked the end of the conflict that 
some called the War for Survival, the War for 
Humanity, or the War Against Fascism but that 
most people termed simply World War IT. 

Begun by the Japanese in treachery and prose- 
cuted with a savage brutality abhorred by the 
civilized world, the war in the Pacific came to an 
abrupt close only three short months after the 
collapse and surrender of Nazi Germany.* It 
had been nearly four years, however, since the 
sneak attack on Pearl Harbor had staggered 
.\merica. Unprepared but undaunted, the 
United States and her allies had bravely resisted 
but at best could fight only delaying actions as 
the conquering Japanese forces swept through the 
Philippines, Malaya, and Java to the very gates of 
Australia. Then, although policy dictated that 
the European theater should have first call on 
men, equipment, and supplies, the enemy advance 
was finally stopped. In the carrier air battles 
of the Coral Sea in May and of Midway in June 
1942 the Jap fleet was severely damaged. On 
Guadalcanal and New Guinea our troops fought 
doggedly and successfully in spite of overwhelm- 
ing odds against them. 

The tide of victory was turned at last. It 
surged up through the Solomons and up the long 
ladder to the home islands of Japan. Lae," 

"Facsimiles of ihc German surrender documents are 
published in National Archives, Germany Surrenders 
Uncondilhnatly, which is for sale at 30 cents a copy by 
the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing 
Office, Washington 25, D. C. 



Makin, Tarawa, Kwajalein, Eruwetok, Saipan, 
Guam, and Tinian became far more than names 
for pin points in the Pacific. The liberation of 
the Philippines was not only a brilliant campaign, 
it was a svTnbol of hope to the still-oppressed of 
the East. And then with the taking of Iwo Jima 
and Okinawa in the spring of 1M5 our forces 
were on the threshold of Nippon and there they 
stayed in spite of mass attacks by suicide planes. 
With Germany out of the picture, the full force 
of the Allies could now be turned on the Japanese. 
From our firmly established base on Okinawa, 
our planes flew on announced raids and our fleet 
steamed within sight of Japan's most important 
c ities — unch all en ged . 

Japan was doomed. Her air force was de- 
stroyed and her fleet was annihilated. Although 
she still had millions of troops in the field, al- 
though she still had an empire, she knew that 
cut off as she was she could not maintain her 
forces or hold her empire. On August 5, the 
atomic bomb burst with all its awful power over 
Hiroshima. On August 8, the Soviet Union 
joined the fight, thus completing the encircle- 
ment of Japan. The dropping of a second atomic 
bomb, this time on Nagasaki, made it obvious chat 
Japan was faced not just with defeat but with 
possible obliteration. 

On Friday morning, August 10, Americans 
listening to their radios were electrified by the 
flash— "The Japs accept the Potsdam Declara- 
tion." A Japanese broadcast saying that Japan 
was ready to surrender if the Emperor's pre- 
rogatives were not prejudiced had been picked 
up. That evening Washington confirmed the 
fact that a peace proposal had been received and 
the next day the United States, on behalf of 
herself, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, 
and China, replied that the Emperor and the 
Japanese Government would be subject to the 
Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers. 
Three days later word of Japan's acceptance was 

Page one 



received in Washington. At 7 p. m. on August 
14, President Truman announced the uncondi- 
tional surrender of the last of our enemies. There 
was peace once more in the world. 

At the formal surrender aboard the Missouri, 
Japan was represented by Foreign Minister 
Mamoru Shigemitsu and General Yoshijiro 
Umezu, whose credentials, in Japanese, are 
signed by Emperor Hirohito above the seal of the 
Empire. The English translations of these docu- 
ments were furnished by the Japanese. 

Escorted by Lieutenant General Jonathan M. 
Wainwright, hero of Corregidor, and Lieutenant 
General Arthur E. Percival, British Commander 
at Singapore when it fell to the Japanese — both 
prisoners of war for more than 3 years — General 
Douglas MacArthur signed the instrument of 
surrender as Supreme Commander, He was 
followed by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, who 
signed for the United States, by General' Hsu 
Yung-Ch'ang for China, Admiral Sir Bruce A. 
Eraser for the United Kingdom, Lieutenant Gen- 
eral Kuzma Derevyanko for the Soviet Union, 
General Sir Thomas Blamey for Australia, 
Colonel L. Moore Cosgrave for Canada, General 
Jacques Le Clerc for France, Admiral C. E. L. 
Helfrich for the Netherlands, and Air Vice Mar- 
shall Leonard M. Isitt for New Zealand. 

In a rescript, or proclamation, signed by the 
Emperor above his seal, Hirohito announced the 
surrender and commanded the Japanese to lay 
down their arms and to carry out the provisions 
of the instrument of surrender. The Japanese 
furnished the English translation of this document 
also. 

These four documents and the translations 
were flown from General MacArthur's head- 
quarters to Washington. There on September 7 
at ceremonies in the White House they were pre- 
sented by Seci^etary of War Stimson to President 
Truman, who announced that the documents 
were to be placed on exhibition in the National 
Archives where the German surrender papers 
were already on display. The State Department, 
which assumed custody of the records, turned 
them o\'er to the National Archives and on Wed- 
nesday morning, September 1 2, at 11 o'clock 
General Jonathan M. Wainwright opened the 
exhibition of these documents. 

In obedience to the imperial rescript, the gen- 
eral surrender at Tokyo Bay was followed by the 



capitulation of Japanese armies in the field. The 

National Archi\'es has rccci\'ed three of these 
instruments of surrender for permanent prescr\'a- 
tion and they too have been placed on exhibition. 
Lieutenant General Jonathan M. Wainwright 
was given the honor of receiving the surrender 
of the Japanese in the Philippines, where he had 
made surh a gallant fight and had endured with 
his men the indignity of defeat and captivity. 
This surrender look place at Camp John Hay, 
Baguio, Mountain Province, Luzon, on Septem- 
ber 3, 1945. The instrument was not signed by 
Wainwright but by Major General Edmond H. 
Leavey, Deputy Commander of the United States 
Army Forces in the Western Pacific. General 
Tomoyuki Yamashita, the cruel "Tiger of 
Malaya," and Vice Admiral Dcnhichi Okochi 
signed for the Japanese. 

The surrender of the Japanese forces in south- 
ern Korea took place at Seoul on September 9, 
1 945, at 1 630 hours. Lieutenant General Yoshio 
Sozuki, senior commander of the ground and air 
forces in Korea, and Gisaburo Yamaguchi, senior 
commander of the naval forces in the area, acted 
on behalf of the Japanese. Nobuyuki Abe, Gov- 
ernor General of Korea, also signed in recognition 
of his duty to carry out orders of the Commanding 
General of the United States Army Forces in 
Korea, Lieutenant General John R. Hodge, who 
accepted the surrender. Admiral Thomas C. 
Kinkaid, representative of the United States 
Navy, also signed this instrument. 

Admiral The Lord Louis Mountbatten, Su- 
preme Allied Commander, South East Asia, ac- 
cepted the surrender of the Japanese in that area. 
The instrument of surrender was signed at Singa- 
pore at 0341 hours on September 12, 1945. The 
Supreme Commander of the Japanese Expedi- 
tionary Forces in the Southern Regions, Field 
Marshal Count Juichi Terauchi, was supposed to 
surrender his sword to Lord Mountbatten but 
he was too ill to appear. Instead, General 
Seishiro Itagaki, Commander at Singapore and 
Deputy Commander in South East Asia, repre- 
sented the Japanese and signed the document. 

These surrender documents, reproduced herein 
in facsimile, are a reminder not only of our 
triumph but also of that responsibility of which 
President Truman spoke — -the responsibility "to 
.see to it that this victory shall be a monument 
worthy of the dead who died to win it." 




Radio Script of the Ceremonies Opening the Exhibit 
of the Japanese Surrender Documents 



Announcer : Ladies and gentlemen, from the 
Exhibition Hall of the National Archives in our 
Nation's Capital is brought to you a special cere- 
mony during which the original Japanese sur- 
render documents will be placed on public display. 

This hall provides an impressive and appro- 
priate setting for the display of such historic docu- 
ments. Beneath a great half dome, which rises 
75 feet above the floor, arc murals by Barry 
Faulkner picturing in heroic size the signing of the 
Declaration of Independence and the submission 
of the Constitution to the President of the Con- 
tinental Congress. In the cases around the hall, 
which is bedecked with the flags of the United 
Nations, are documents marking milestones on 
America's road from war to peace. The declaia- 
tion of war against Japan, the agreement to 
launch the Normandy invasion, the Teheran and 
Yalta Agreements, the German surrender docu- 
ments, and copies of the United Nations Charter 
arc among the items being shown in an exhibit 
on international cooperation for war and peace. 

Today the Japanese surrender documents 
signed on board the battleship Alissouri on Sep- 
tember 2 are to be added to this exhibit. They 
were flown to Washington from Tokyo soon after 
the signing and were presented to President Tru- 
man. They are now in the hall's center case, 
which is in the form of a shrine. At each side of 
it, a military guard of honor stands at rigid 
attention. Before it sit a number of honor guests, 
among them two veterans of Balaan, Pfc Felman 
Cappel and Cpl. Russell Villiers. 

The case will be unveiled by General Jonathan 
M. Wainwright, the hero of Corregidor, and 
Dr. Solon J, Buck, Archivist of the United States, 
will accept the documents for exhibition. The 
Speaker of the House, the Honorable Sam Ray- 
burn, will serve as master of ceremonies. 

High-ranking military officers of the United 
Nations, resplerdcnt in gold braid and numerous 



decorations, and Members of Congress, the Cabi- 
net, and the diplomatic corps have just taken their 
places around the center case. 

And, now, the next voice you will hear is that 
of Mr. Thad Page, Administrative Secretary of 
the National Archives. 

Mr. Pare: Ladies and gentlemen, it gives me 
great pleasure, on behalf of the Archivist of the 
United States and the staff of the National 
Archives, to welcome you to the National Arcfiivcs 
on this important occasion. I now have the 
privilege and honor of introducing to you a dis- 
tinguished statesman, who will act as master of 
ceremonies, the Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, the Honorable Sam Rayburn. 

Speaker Raybl'Rn: Ladies and gendcmen, 
nearly 4 years ago, on December 7, 1941, that 
"day of infamy," Japan treacherously struck at 
Pearl Harbor. The Nation was shocked and 
angry, but it was not stunned. It was galvanized 
into action. We had not sought war, but when 
war came we mobilized our men, materials, and 
machines into the greatest fighting force and the 
greatest arsenal of democracy the world had ever 

Meanwhile, however, our gallant men on 
Bataan, first under General Douglas MacArlhur 
and then under Lieutenant General Jonathan M. 
Wainwright, were fighting against hopeless odds. 
With no aid from outside possible, the fall of 
Corregidor was inevitable. The courage of its 
defenders and the brutality of the Jap victors, 
however, turned it from defeat into a flaming 
symbol— a promise that Corregidor would be 
avenged. 

"I shall return," MacArthur vowed. But dur- 
ing those grim days when democracy was on the 
defensive and modern civilization seemed on the 
verge of collapse, the fulfillment of that promise 
seemed a long way o(T. Nevertheless, it gave a 
ray of hope to an almost hopeless world. All of 

Page three 



us now realize how, after much bitter fighting on 
land and sea and in the air, that promise was 
gloriously and magnificently fulfilled. We are 
all familiar with the successful campaigns that 
followed the liberation of the Philippines — Balik- 
papan, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa — and that led to 
the unconditional surrender of Japan. 

It is fitting that the documents that now give, 
and will continue to give through unborn genera- 
tions, evidence of the triumph of the United 
Nations over the Japanese Empire should be 
added to the other significant documents on dis- 
play in this room. These documents now take 
their place along with the German surrender 
papers, copies of the San Francisco Charter, and 
papers relating to the various international con- 
ferences attended by President Roosevelt and 
President Truman — Casablanca, Quebec, Cairo, 
Teheran, Yalta,' and Potsdam. Altogether they 
reflect the story of our efforts and those of our 
allies to win the war and bring peace once again 
to the world. 

It is equally fitting — peculiarly appropriate^ — ■ 
that these Japanese surrender documents should 
be unveiled for public display by one of history's 
greatest heroes, a man who even in defeat symbo- 
lized the ideals and objectives for which this 
Nation mobilized all its resources, a man who 
contributed greatly to our ultimate victory by 
holding out with meager and inadequate resources 
far longer than was expected, a man who, despite 
temporary defeat and indignities heaped upon 
him during many months in Japanese prison 
camps, never lost his spirit or his faith in America, 
a man who by his courage and indomitable will 
contributed immeasurably to ultimate victory. 
Ladies and gentlemen, it is my privilege to present 
to you the hero of Bataan and Corrcgidor, who 
will unveU the Japanese surrender documents, 
General Jonathan M. Wainwright. 

General Wainwright: Mr. Speaker, Dr. 
Buck, ladies and gentlemen, the first thing I want 
to say to you is that being home is fine, I was 
deeply moved by being invited to attend the Japa- 
nese surrender ceremonies aboard the batdeship 
Missouri, and I was touched when General Mac- 
.\rthur presented me with the first pen he used to 
sign the instrument of surrender. Today you 
bestow upon me another great honor, that of 
making available to the American people the 
documents that bear enduring evidence of the 



supremacy of right over might and of the return 
of peace to a distraught world. On this occasion, 
as always, I think of the brave men who served 
under my command. On their behalf, as well 
as on my own, I am pleased to un\eil the docu- 
ments that brought final peace to a war-torn and 
war- weary world. 

Speaker Rayburn : Thank you, General 
Wainwright. I know something about the hard- 
ships endured by Japanese prisoners of war, but 
in view of the rigid schedule that you have ex- 
perienced during the last few days and the strenu- 
ous schedule facing you tomorrow in New York, 
I am afraid that until you are permitted some 
relaxation and rest, Manchuria might still look 
good to you. At any rate you may be assured 
that we are grateful to you for being here today, 
and I want you to know that you will live in the 
hearts of ^Vmericans forever. 

All of us know and are immensely proud of the 
part played by the Navy and the Marine Corps 
in bringing the war to a successful conclusion. 
We have with us a distinguished Naval officer. 
Rear Admiral H, H. Good, who is here to repre- 
sent the Secretary of the Navy. Admiral Good, 
will you be kind enough to come up on the steps 
so the audience can see you. 

And now it is my pleasure to present to you the 
Archivist of the United States, who will accept 
the Japanese surrender documents for public 
display and read a message from the President of 
the United States. Ladies and gentlemen, the 
Archivist of the United States, Dr. Solon J, Buck. 

The Archivist: Speaker Rayburn, General 
Wainwright, ladies and gentlemen. It is a 
pleasure and an honor to receive from you, Gen- 
eral Wainwright, these documents that mark the 
end of eight long years of war for our brave and 
enduring ally China and nearly four years of 
valiant fighting for ourselves and our other allies. 
When plans were being made for the exhibit on 
international cooperation for war and peace, to 
which these documents are now added, Franklin 
D. Roosevelt, whom President Truman has called 
the "defender of democracy" and the "architect 
of world peace and cooperation," was still alive. 
He took a great interest in this exhibit because he 
wanted the people to know the road to peace as he 
was traveling it. Litde did we imagine that he 
was to be cut down with the end of that road 
almost in sight. Nor did we think this spring 



'a.e /o. 



when the German surrender documents took their 
place in this hall that in but four short months 
we would see the complete capitulation of our 
brutal enemy Japan. 

Today, as these Japanese surrender documents 
join the Lcnd-Lease Act, the declaration of war 
against Japan, the Yalta and other Agreements, 
the German surrender documents, and the United 
Nations Charter, the story on international co- 
operation for war and peace that this exhibit 
seeks to tell is completed. 

The exhibit is completed. The war has ended. 
An organization to preserve the peace and se- 
curity of the world has been devised. But there 
have been other surrenders, other agreements, and 
other international organizations — the archives of 
the United Stales hold many of their stories, some 
of them tragic. This time we must not forget 
that enduring peace for the world rests on more 
than these structures. The possibility of its 
achievement lies in the hearts and wills of our- 
selves, of our allies, and even of our enemies. 

President Truman has asked me to express his 
regret that he could not be here today to pay his 
respects to General Wainwright and to all those, 
Hving and dead, whose unflinching bravery 



brought the Japanese to their knees. He has 
sent a message, however, which he has asked me 
to read. This is his message : 

"It is with profound satisfaction that this day 
we are able to lay before the people of the United 
States and the representatives of our faithful allies 
these tokens of the downfall of our enemy in the 
Pacific — the Japanese unconditional surrender 
documents. They arc only sheets of paper, some 
of them written in a language most of us cannot 
read, but they are an eternal reminder of that 
indomitable courage of our fighting forces and of 
tiic home front that led us through the disastrous 
days of Pearl Harbor, Bataan, and Corregidor to 
final victory. 

"The world is now at peace but we would be- 
tray those who died to make peace possible — wc 
would make these surrender documents a mock- 
ery- — if we did not continue to battle against the 
evil ideologies of those who forced war upon the 
world. Those ideas must be wiped out, and the 
German and Japanese people must be taught, 
with sternness but with justice, to live in a world 
where there is respect for the rights of nations and 
of men. This we must do to protect and perpetu- 
ate that peace we have so dearly won." 







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Foreign Minister Shigemilsii's credentials 
{Original document 12'/2 by IBYi inches) 





Trin?lii*^'"'i 


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eiacuiTO, 






17 tba Graca of BnaTsa, Ekperor of Jqian, seated on 


thouMsd six tumdnd and fittb yvar froa tba aommIob 




ttw ThroM occupied by the eas* Umaaty cbaas^Uea through 


of tbe lmB»T<xt Zlam. 




•ges etarnal, 






To all to lAioa these fMGents shall com, GMetlagl 






We do hereby authorise Uamoru Shifsenltsu, Zyosanai, 
Fliet Class of tba Iiq>erial Order of the Blslafc; Sua to 






Seal of 






attach his slgiiature by comiuiid and in behalf of Ourselves 


tba 


Slgiwdi HIROUZIO. 




is lequired by the Sapnae CoounaDder for the Allied Povers 


«aplM 










to be signed. 






In witnoae whereof, We have hereunto set Our eignature 


Counterslgnedi lanthiko-o 




and caused the Qreat Seal of the Smpiie to be affiled. 






Oivea St Our Palace in Tolcyo, this first day of tLe 






ninth month of the twentieth year of Syows, being the two 






taouaand 




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Translation of Foreign MinisU 


Skigemitsu's credentials 




{Each page of original docum 


nt 9ys by 13'A inches) 



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General i 
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HIROHITO, 




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H7 the Grace of Heaven, iiiperor of Japan, seated oa 


thousand sii hundred and fifth year 


froB the Accession 




the Tlirone occupied by the aame tjnssty changeleas through 


of the Eaperor Zinau, 






B&B etsraal. 








To all to whom these Preaents ahall cone, Greetlngl 








,;e do hereby authorise Yoehljlro Umezu, Zyoaaninl, 
Pirat ClssE of the Imperial OTuer of the Hlsine ^Ju", .;^cond 












Seal of 






Class of the Imperial Military Order of the Golden Kite, 




the 


Signed) H I B 


H I T 0. 




to attacQ his signature by conmand and in behalf of 
Ourselves and Our laperial General Headquartere unto the 




Sopire 














Inatruaent of Surrender which is Mquired by the diqireme 








COBnandar for the Allied Powere to be Bigned. 

In witness sDewof, ,ye have bereunto set Our signature 
and caused the Great Seal of the impire to be affiMd. 


Counters ignedi 


ToBhlJiro Uoexu 

Chief of the General 
Staff of the laperlal 
Japanese imj 




Given at Our palace in Tokyo, this first day of th« 
ninth ■oath of the trontieth year of jyowa. being the two 




Soemu Toyoda 

Chief of the General 
Staff of the Ii^erial 
japansae Havy 




thousand 






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Translation of Gener 
(Each page of original doc 


il Umezii's credentials 
ument 9^ by 13]/^ inches) 





INSTRUMENT OF SURRENDER 



", acting by command of and in behalf of the Emperor of ^ 



Japanese Conernmenl and the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters, 
■ hereby accept the provisions set forth in the declaration issued by the heads 
of the Governmenls of the United Stales, China and Great Britain on 26 
July 1945, at Potsdam, and subseguenlly adhered to by the Union of Soviet 
Socialist Republics, which four powers ore hereafter referred to as the Allied 

We hereby proclaim the unconditional surrender lo the Allied 
Powers of the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters and of all 
Japanese armed forces and all armed forces under Japanese control 
mftarwvar situated. 

We hereby command all Japanese forces wherever siluoled ond 
the Japanese people to cease hostilities forthwith, lo preserve ond save 
from damage oil ships, aircraft, ond military and ciiril properly and to 
comply with all requirements which may he imposed by the Supreme 
Commander for the Allied Powers or by agencies of the Japanese 
Government at his direction. 

We hereby command the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters 
to issue at ance orders lo the Commanders of all Japanese forces 
and all forces under Japanese control wherever situated to surrender 
unconditionally themselves and all forces under their control. 

We hereby command all civil, military and naval officials ta 
obey and enforce all proclamations, orders and directives deemed 
by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers to be proper to 
effectuate this surrender ond issued by him or under his authority 
and we direct all such officials to remain at their posts and to 
continue to perform their non-combatant duties unltss specifically 
relieved by him or under his authority. 

We hereby undertalie for the Emperor, the Japanese 
Government ond their successors lo carry out the provisions of the 
Potsdam Declaration in goad faith, and to issue whatever orders 
and tolie whatever action may be required by the Supreme Commander 
for the Allied Powers or by any other designated representative of 
the Allied Powers for the purpose of giving effect la that Declaration. 



We hereby command the Japanese Imperial Government and 
the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters at once to liberate all' 
allied prisoners of war and civilian internees now under Japanese 
control ond ta provide for their protection, care, maintenance and 
immediate transportation to places as directed. 

The outhority of the Emperor and the Japanese Government to 
ml* the state shall be subject to the Supreme Commander for the 
Allied Powers who will lake such steps os he deems proper to 
effectuate these terms of surrender. 

Instrument of surrendet signed at Tokyo Bay 
{Each page of original document isy^ by 22y4 inches) 



Page twelve 



signed at tokvo bay . japan of ■^/ ^-y - 
SECOND day of September 



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ftf Command and in ta/talf of the Emparor of „ 
and tho Japanaaa Sovarnmtnt. 



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Adapted at TOKYO say, japan 
aEfi.QH.D . day of 



oQo '^ 



for itie United States, Republic of CItino, United Kingdom and Ihe 
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and in the interests of ll>e other 
United Notions at war witl> Japan. 




Republic of Ct>ino Represantalive 
a>-w-eji- ^r^<- (XJ\ SUV. 




Commonweoltli 43t-Aistfdlid ReprfmihhWa 
Dominion of Canada Representative 



Provisional Government of the Franet) 
Republie. Reprvsenfotivi 



Kingdom Of tlie Niiftierlonds Repnsanlativa 

^-' n^ a,^ ,[' — £^ — rf ,-K<^tt~' 

Dominion of New Zealand Reprgsentotiva 




Emperor Hirohito's rescript, page I 
{Original document 11^ by IS'/i inches) 



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Emperor HtTohito's Tescnpl, page 2 
(Original document UYi by IB'/a inches) 



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/ 


ty *1» hoadB of tb« Gorormonta of tta* Daitad atatea, Qraat 
Britain and China on Jul; 26th, 1945 at Fotadaa and anbaa- 


tUnoru ShlEemitau 

liinister for 7orelga IffaliB 

lUnister for Hom iffalrs 




quently adherad to by tb» Union of Soviet 3ooialiat fiapublioa, 
W« haia ocwianded tbo Jvaneso IsparlaJ. OorernBant and tba 
J^panaae Imperial General Hftadquartara to olga on Our behalf 


Julchl Tsushima 
Ulniater of ?lnance 

Sadanu Shinoaura 
Minister of War 




the Inatrunent of Surrender presented by tbe StqiTeine Comoander 
for the AlUed Powers and to laaue General Orders to tba 
Killtary sad Haval Forces in accortance with tbs direction 


Uitsunasa Tonal 
Uioister of Hav7 

Chuzo Ivata 
Mlaleter of Justice 




of the Bapmao CoouBaader for the AlUed Pomps. «e coMand 
all Our poopla forthwith to eeaae hostilities, to lay down 
their aros and faithfully to carry out all the provisions 


Tanon Uoeda 

Minister of Sduoatton 

Kerao Uatsunura 

Hinister of TaUare 




of lostpumeat of Surrender end tba General Qrdara lasued by 
the Japanese laperlal Goronmeot and the Japanese l^wrlsl 


Eotaro Sengoka 
Hinister of igrieultuz* 
and Forestry 




Geoeral Headquarters hereunder. 

ThiB second day of the ninth aonth of tba twentieth 
year of Syowe. 


ChDnihel VaJcaJlaa 
Idlniater of Coomerce 
and Industry 

Naoto Koblyana 
lUnlatar of Tranaportation 










FuBlnaro Eoaoe 

Minister without Portofolio 

Tatotora Ogata 

Mlnlater without PortofoUo 




Seal of 








the 

Smperor 


Signedi HiaOBITO 


BlDsblro Oteta 

Minister without Portofolio 






Countorsignsdt HeruhiJco-o 

Prlaa HlniataT 




Translation of Emperor Hiroh 


to's rescript 




{Each page of original document 9y 


by ISYi inches) 



3«fitmmwit of ^ntvBnbn 

of the 

Japanese and Japanese-Controlled Armed Forces in the Philippine Islands 

to the 

Commanding General 

United States Army Forces, Western Pocific 

Camp John Hay 

Bagiiio, Mountoin Province, 

Luzon, Philippine Islondt 

3 September 1945 

Pursuont to and in accordance with the proclomotion of the Emperor of Japan 
accepting the terms set forth in the declaration issued by the heods of the Govern- 
ments of the United States, Great Britain and China on 26 July 1945, ot Potsdam 
and subsequently odhered to by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; and to the 
formal instrument of surrender of the Joponese Imperial Government and the 
Japanese Imperial General Heodquartcrs signed at Tokyo Bay ot 0^03 on Z Sep- 
tember 1945: 

1. Acting by command of and !n behalf of the Emperor of Japan, the Joponese 
Imperial Government ond the Joponese Imperial General Heodquarters, We hereby 
surrender unconditionally to the Commending General, United States Army Forces, 
Western Pacific, all Japanese and Japanese-controlled armed forces, air, sea, 
ground and ouxiliory, in the Philippine Islands. 

2. We hereby command oil Japanese forces wherever situoted in the Philippine 
Islands to cease hostilities forthwith, to preserve and save from damoge oil ships, 
oircroft and military and civil property, and to comply with oil requirements which 
may be imposed by the Commanding Generol, United States Army Forces, Western 
Pacific, Of his authorized representatives. 

3. We hereby direct the commanders of all Joponese forces in the Philippine 
Islands to issue ot once to all forces under their command to surrender uncondition> 
ally themselves and oil forces under their control, as prisoners of war, to the neor- 
cst United States Army Force Commander. 

4. We hereby direct the commanders of all Japanese forces in the Philippine 
Isknds to surrender intact and in good order to the nearest United States Army 
Force Commander, at times and at places directed by him, all equipment and sup- 
plies of whotever nature under their control. 

5. We hereby direct the commanders of all Japanese forces in the Philippine 
Islands at once to liberate all Allied prisonen of war and civilian internees under 
their control, ond to provide for their protection, core, maintenance and immediate 
transportation to places as directed by the nearest United States Army Fore« 
Commander. 

InsiTument of sunender of Japanese forces in the Philippines 
{Each page of original document 91/^ by 15 inches) 



6. SVe hereby undertake to transmit the directives as given in Poragraph's 1 
through S, above, to all Jopanese forces in the Philippine islands immediotely by 
all means within our power, and further to furnish to the Commanding General, 
United States Army Forces, Western Pacific, all necessary Japanese emissaries 
fully empowered to bring about the surrender of Japanese forces in the Philippine 
Islands with whom we are not in contact. 

7. We hereby undertoke to furnish immediately to the Commanding Gcnerol, 
United States Army Forces, Western Pacific, a statement of the designation, num- 
bers, location and commanders of oil Japanese armed forces, groiind, sea or air, in 
the Philippine Islands. 

8. We hereby undertake faithfully to obey all further proclamation, orders and 
directives deemed by the Commonding Generol, United States Army Forces, West- 
ern Pacific, to be proper to effectuate this surrender. 

Signed at Camp John flay, Baguio, Mountain Province, Luzon, Philippine Islonds, 
Dt IIIO hours 3 September 1945: 



TOMOYUlifY*MASHITA, 
General, Imperial Japonese Army 
Highest Commander, Imperial 
Joponesc Army in the Philippines. 



4UulOuek 



DENHIC) OKOCHi, 
Vice Admiral, Imperiol Japanese Navy 
Highest Commander, Imperial 
Japanese Navy in the Philippines. 



By command of and in beholf 

of the Japanese Imperial 

General Headquorters 

Accepted at Comp John flay, Baguio, Mountain Province, Luzon 

Philippine Islands, at |%.10 hours 3 September 1945: 

For the Commander-in-Chief, United States Army Forces, Pacific: 




-'edmond H. LEAVEY, 
Major General, USA 
Deputy Commander, United States Army Forces, 
Western Pacific. 



Page eightei 



T^^ 



UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES IN KOREA 

HEADQUARTERS XXIV CORPS 

OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING GENERAL 

APO 23.?, c/o POSTMASTER 

SAN FRANOSCO, CALIFORNIA 



KtRUAL SUIffiEIIEGK BT THE 3HiI0R JAPAHESE OROOHD, 
SKA, Am Aim AUIILIAHY FX)RCBS CCWMANDEE3 WTTHIH 
KOREA SOUTH OF 38° NOnTH UTITirDE TO THE COU- 
liAHDIHG GEMERAL, UNITED STATES AHMT FORCES ffl 
KOREA, FOR AND IN EEIALF OF C0MKAMDEH-IH-CH3EF 
UNITED STATES ARI.tT FORCES, PACIFIC 



WHEREAS an Instnanent of Surrender waa on the 2d digr of 
Soptenbar I'^hS t? coonand of and in behalf of the Eknparor of 
Japan, the Japanese Goventaant and the Japanese Imperial Head- 
quarters signed by Foreien Minister Maooru Shigflnitsu by con- 
nand of and in behalf of the Einperor of Japan, the Japanese 
GoVemmant and b7 Toshijiro Urnezu by conraand of and in behalf 
or the Japanese Imperial Headquarters and 

WlIEr^RfVS the terms of the Inatnraent of Surrender were 
substfintlally as follows ; 

"1. Vfe, acting by coeoand of and in behalf of the 
Sbperor of Japan, the Japanese Gorermant and the J^iansse 
Imperial General Headq'jarters , hereby accept the prorislons 
in the declaration Issued by tiie heads of the goremaenta of 
the United States, China and Great Britain 26 Ju2y 19h5 at 
Potsdati, and subsequently adhered to ty tha Union of the 
Soviet Socialist Republics, which four ponors are hereafter 
referred to as the Allied Pamrtt 

"2. iiTe herefcrjr proclaJa the unconditional surrender to 
the Allied hjirars of the Japaneae Jjqwrlal General Headquairtaav 
and of all Japanese amed forces and all anned forces under 
Japanese control wharerer situated, 

"3> Ve haretpy coianand all Japanese forces wherever situ- 
ated and the Japanese people to cease hostilities forthwith, 
to par«ser7e and savB frcsa damage all ahlpe, air crafts, and 
military and cItH property and to cci^ly with *11 require- 
ments which ms^ be inposed by the Supreme Ccmnander for the 
Allied Powers or by agencies of tha Japanese GoYamnant ct 
his direction. 

"U. Ve hereby cccmiand the Japanese Iztperlal General 
Headquarters to ixaue at once orders to the eoEnanders of aU 

ImtrumeiU of surrcndeT of Jafmvese forces in soulhan Korea 
[Each page of original document 8 by lOYs inches] 



Page nineteen 



UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES IN KOREA 

HEADQUARTERS XXIV CORPS 

OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING CENtRAL 

APO 235, Lv'u POSTMASTER 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFOKNIA 



Japanese forces and all forces under JapaneBO control ulierevBr 
situated to surrender uncondit lonaUy thasselvee and all foroaa 
under thsix control. 

"5. ffa hereby conBnand all cItII, miHtary and naval of- 
ficials to obey zuid enforce all proclaoiations, orders and 
directlTQS deaniod by the Suprfaae Coonander for the Allied 
Powers to be ja'oper and to effectuate this surrender and is- 
sued by him or under his authority and we direct all such 
officials to remain at their posts and to continae to perform 
their non-combatant duties unless specifically relieved ty 
iiim or under his authority, 

"6. We hereby undertake for the Einperor, the Japanese 
GovemDent and their successors to carry out the ftrovislons of 
the Potsdam Declaration in good falth^ and to issue whatever 
or'Jera and talce whatever action ma^ be required by the Snpregoe 
Cosnander for the Allied Pernors or by any other designated 
Representative of the Allied Powers for the purpose of giving 
effect fco that declaration. 

"7. We hereby coramand tlie Japanese Imperial Govenmsnt 
and the Japanese Imperial donoral Headquarters at once to 
liberate all Allied Prisoners of War and civilian internees 
now under Japanese control and to provide for their protection, 
care, inaintenance and immediate transportation to pl^ea as 
directed. 

"8, The authority of tba Qaperor and the Jajianese Govern- 
ment to rule the state shall be subject to the Supmns Ccnnandar 
for the Allied Poware wlio will talce such steps as he deaats proper 
to effectuate these terns of surrender" and 

WHEREAS the terms of surrender were, on the 2d day of Sep- 
tember 19b? as given by the United States, the Republic of 
China, the United Kingdcm, the Union of Soviet Socialist Re- 
publics and other allied powers, accepted by the Imperial 
Japanese Govemnent, and 

WHEREAS on the 2d dsy of September 19U5 the Imperial 
General Headquarters by direction of the Qiqieror has ordered 
all its conmandors in Japan and abroad to cause the Japanese 



p 



UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES IN KOREA 

HEADQUARTERS XXIV CORPS 

OFFICE OF THE COMMAKDiNG CEHEKAL 

APO 23S, c/o POSTMASTER 

SAN FRANQSCO, CALlFORftU 



Armod Forcss and Japanase oontrollad foroos uMiBr their ccm~ 
maiKl to ceaae hostilities at once, to Isj doim thedr arms and 
rwsain in their present Xocations ajid to surrsnclar iinconditLon- 
ftlly to ccxmaDdere acting on b^alf of the United States , the 
Republic of Chlna> the United Klngdcm, the British Si^ire and 
the Union of Soviet Socialist RepabUcs, and 

WHEREAS the I^qperlal Qenar^ Headquarters, Its senior ccd- 
mandars and all ground, sea, air and auxiliary forces in the 
nain islands of Japan, minor islands adjacent thereto, Korea 
south of 38" north latitude and the HiilippineB were directed 
to surrender to the Camandei^ln-Chief of the United States 
Anny Forces, Pacific and 

WHEREAS the Coctnandar-in-Chief of the United States Aiiny 
Forces, Pacific has appointed the CcoEianding General, XXI7 
Corps as the Ccnnnanding General, United States Army Forces in 
Korea, and has directed him as such to tict for the Ccoiandar- 
lii-Chief United States Any Forces, Pacific in the reception of 
t)% surrender of the senior Japanese ccnsoanders of all Japanese 
ground, sea, air and auxiliary forces in Korea south of 38'^ 
north latitude and all islands adjacent thereto. How therefore 

We, the undersigned, senior Japanese ccarananders of all 
Japanese ground, sea, air and auxiliary forces in Korea south 
of 38° north latitude, do herein acknowledge: 

a. That iw have been duly advised and fully infonaed of 
the contents of the Proclanation tgr the Qi^ieror of Japan, the 
Instnoaant of Surrender and the orders hereinabove referred to. 

b. That we accept our duties and obligations under said 
Inatruovrts and orders and recognize the necessity for our 
strict compliance thaorvwith and adherenoe thereto. 

c. That the CoMnandine General, United States Am^ Forces 
in Korea, is the diUy authorised repreeentatlve of the CcnniAndu:^ 
in-Chief United States Anqy Forces, Pacific and that we will 
cdtq^letely and ianedlstely carry out and put into effect his 
instructions. 

Finally, we 4o hareby formally and unconditionally sur- 
render to the Caamanding General, United States ArDQr Forces in 



UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES IN KOREA 

HEADQUARTERS XXIV CORPS 

OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING GENERAL 

APO 235. c/o POSTMASTER 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Korea, all peraoiu ijj Koarva south of 36 d*grees North Latitnda 
irtio are In ths Annod Forces o£ J^ian, and all mil Itary installa- 
tiaoa, ordnanoe, ahlps, aircraft and othar military- equi^iiwiTt 
or property of every kind or descriptlMi in Koi^a, including 
all islands adjacent thereto, south of 30 degreea North Latitude 
OTBT irtiloh tn exercise Jurisdictlan or control, 

Bi caae of oonfllot or ambiguity betneen the English text 
of this document and tmy translation thereof « tha Engliah shall 
prevail. 

Signed at SEOUL, KOREA, at/e^dhoura on the ^h da^ of 
Septeatoer 1^U5, 



Japanese ground and air forces 
in Korea south of 38" north 



pLl i^ 



^Ar^^ 



Senior Japanese ccnsnandar of all 
Japanese naval forces in Korea 
•outh of 38° north latitude. 



I, Nobiyukl Abe, the duly appointed, qualified and acting 
Oovomor General of KOREA do hereby certify that I have read 
ajsi C-illff ijndmMt.and- t.hn eontants of tha f oreiroing Iiistruinont 
of Surrender, and of all docanante referred to therein, 

I hereby ackncwladge the duties and obligations imposed 
iqx)n ma l^ said documents, insofar as they apply to all 
matters -within my Juriadictlon or control as Governor General 
of Korea, and reoogoiae ths neoesslty of ny strict oospllanca 
theroirlth and adherence thereto. 



.u- 



Page twenty 'two 




' *«[^ffil?v.'v.:?^-'* ' 



UNITED STATES ARMY FORCES IN KOREA 



HEADQUARTERS XXIV CORPS 

OFKICE OF THE COMMANDING GENERAL 

AFO 235, c/o POSTMASTER 

SAN FRANCiSCO, CAUFORNIA 



In portljcular do I rocognlza that the CflBoandlng G«nsral, 
UNITED STATES ATOCr FORGES IH KOREA is the duly aathorlaod r«p- 
reaautatlTB of the Ccaoandar-iit-Chlaf , UNITED- STATES AIOH 
rX)BC!i;s, PACIFIC, and that I m cot^lateV and Jnwdiat*!?- to 
ears7 out and put Into affect his instructions. 



Signed at SEOUL, IS5REA, at 
SeptMibor 19li%, 



t/^U 



hours am the ?th dqr of 



^f ^/? ^i ff 



Aoeeptad at SEOUL, KOKEA, at/^*^houro on the Hh d^r 
of Septad)er 19U5 for azid in behalf of the Ccnnandeir-in-ChiAi' 
or the Iftiitod States tixa^ Forces, Paciflo* 





JCilIH B. ffin 
eutanant Oenaral, U. ; 
CoDoandine General 
[ited States Axi^y Forces In Korea 



7i^...^^^^'&^^i^^~Qc..i^_ 



TTTrrrmm 

Adalral, U. S. Nofy 
Ropr a es rt ativa of the United Statee HaifT 



Page twenty-three 



IMSTRUMENT O 



F JAPANESE FORCES UNDER 
THE SUPREME COMMANDER, 
RCES, SOUTHERN REGIONS, 
HEATHE OF THF. SUPREME 





(-i 


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ne plenipclenl 


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J^pineie Gov 








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cin,pc 


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crm: Con, mender. Up.n 


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Allied Conim. 


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.1945 








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he Supreme Allied Commi 


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1. Any diiuliedieoce ol. or dcl.y or fiilure lo comply wilh. aide 
Supreme Allied C'om.n.nder. Souih E.il An., or iiiued e 
.uWdinale N..1I. MilKi'y or Air Force Comm.ndeii ol uh.te. 
■he Supreo.e Allied Comm.nder, Souih E.il A.I., or hi. lulxirr 
hit behJI. n..y de.ermme 10 be del.lmenl.l lo ll.e Aliicd Pow 
Supreme .MIicJ C..mm.nder, South E>.I All. m.y decide. 



> ellecl Imm ihe t 



00 of the Supreme Allied Comnoni 



ri<CM.T.)on l2Sepl 




jUAs^i^^^^^ 



Instrument of surrender of Japanese forces in South East Asia 
{Original document 8]/-. by M'/z inches)