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Full text of "The Express Newspaper"

L Quality Golf Equipment C 

"7^ 




352-1157 

I Tues - Sat 9:00 - 4:00 r 
L 601-D Front St. Emporium $ 



City of Nelson Newsletter. . . Page 24 



EXPRESS 



Wednesday, June 13, 2007 




354-4089 



Established 1988. 



SERVING NELSON & AREA 



VOLUME 19, NUMBER 29 




l®gXal 




CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Above, Jessie Greer shows the exuberance seen on all of LV. Rogers' graduating 
students as the 2007 Calvacade made its way through Nelson's streets. In the left 
photo. Beau Stephenson, left, Michelle Sturtevant, Megan Kwan and Daniel Klein 
packed the back of their car during the parade that saw some rain during the 
June 9 parade 



Kutenai Landing inspected 

Nelson City Council sets June 21 public hearing for controversial condominium development on city's waterfront 



by Chris Shepherd 

By the end of June 
Nelson City Council will 
have put the Kutenai 
Landing development 
behind them, one way or 
another. 

Council gave the pro- 
posed 139 unit condomin- 
ium development its first 
two readings at their June 
11 meeting and set 5 p.m. 
at the Best Western Inn 
for the final public hear- 
ing on the matter. 

Kevin Cormack, Nelson 
City manager, presented 
councillors with the lat- 
est draft of the memo- 
randum of understanding 
surrounding the develop- 
ment. 

The memorandum out- 
lines the developer's obli- 
gations in return for coun- 
cil granting a variance to 



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allow the development. 

Councillor Ian Mason 
and other councillors had 
reservations about passing 
the memorandum, fear- 
ing they were committing 
to something they might 
want to change on further 
inspection. 

Cormack assured them 
negotiations could con- 
tinue until the June 21 
hearing. 

Councillors weren't 
comfortable with how 
frequent changes were 
being made to the memo- 
randum and Coun. Gord 
McAdams asked Cormack 
to provide councillors and 
local media with a "final- 
ized" memorandum by 
Thursday, June 14 to give 
the public time to consider 
the development before 
the public hearing. 

"My job is to make 



H 






Py 


HABITS 

579 Baker St. •505.1120 



sure the public has all the 
information," McAdams 
said at the meeting, and 
council agreed, directing 
City staff to prepare the 
memorandum, short of a 
few details that might still 
be negotiated, by June 
14. 

The proposed devel- 
opment has undergone a 
number of changes since 
it was first presented to 
the public. 

Height 

Originally, the Kutenai 
Landing development was 
set to be six storeys high 
but that was too tall for 
many Nelsonites. 

At the June 5 pub- 
lic meeting, Mike Rink, 
senior project manager of 
the development, said the 
buildings had to be that 
tall. 




"The fundamental rea- 
son we had to make them 
higher ... is to reach the 
density needed." 

The project is facing 
huge up-front costs, Rink 
said. The building site is 
full of wood waste that has 
to be moved and a City 
sewer pipe runs through 
the lot and has to be relo- 
cated. Those costs add up 
to a $1.5-million bill. 

To cover those costs 
and make a profit, they 
need to have a certain size 
which is why the original 
six-storey plan was put 
forward. 



"What we heard from 
the community is six sto- 
reys just seems to be too 
much." 

The developers wres- 
tled with that issue, Rink 
said, and eventually found 
a compromise. 

They took the sixth 
floor off the B building 

- which will be built first 

- and off the retirement 
building. 

The developers also 
made the lakefront part 
of the building just four 
storeys, which will make it 
seem shorter when look- 
ing at the building from 



the lake, Rink said. 

Affordable 
housing 

Initially, 10 affordable 
housing units were a major 
selling point of Kutenai 
Landing, but issues with 
the development's height 
pushed those out. 

Rink, senior project 
manage said the afford- 
able housing units had to 
come off the table to 

Turn to 
KUTENAI on 

page 3 



INSIDE 



Editorial 8 

Street Talk 8 



Crossword 20 Sports & Rec. ... 23 

A&E 12 Classifieds 19 

Calendar 18 



JPR^ 



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www.selkirkvet.com 



SELKIRK VETERINARY HOSPITAL 



Page 2 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Business 




CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Chris Dawson and Barb Williams aren't making a secret of the fact cooking doesn't have to be boring with their store. Culinary 
Conspiracy. 

Kitchen confidential 

Culinary Conspiracy celebrates one year in Nelson and has big plans for the future 



by Chris Shepherd 

Chris Dawson and Barb 
Williams want to let people 
in on a couple of secrets: 
Cooking can be excit- 
ing and they're celebrat- 
ing one year in business 
with their shop, Culinary 
Conspiracy. 

"The goal of the shop 
was to bring high quality, 
hard-to-find products to 
a small community like 
Nelson," Dawson says. 

With their shop tucked 
into the Nelson Trading 
Company Mall at 104-402 
Baker St., Dawson offers 
hundreds of ways to spice 



up work in the kitchen. 

For example, they sell 
three different heat levels 
of paprika, four styles of 
vanilla bean, rare spices 
like Japanese matcha pow- 
der and truffle-infused oil. 

"No one should ever be 
bored with food," Dawson 
says. "We're trying to 
bring the passion back into 
food." 

Dawson and Williams go 
to two food shows a year 
with the goal of finding 
something new and excit- 
ing to add to their shop. 

Their latest finds were 
cedar papers to wrap 
around fish and Crispy 



Green, a line of freeze- 
dried fruit that Dawson 
says they can't keep on the 
shelves. 

Dawson's store also 
features a kitchen where 
local chefs teach cooking 
classes that show people 
how to liven things up in 
the kitchen. 

To celebrate the one- 
year anniversary, Dawson 
planned food demonstra- 
tions, samples of products 
and prizes on Saturday, 
June 30. 

"Our one-year anniver- 
sary is a chance to thank 
everybody who has sup- 
ported us in our first year." 



Dawson will also intro- 
duce a Culinary Conspiracy 
line of spices. 

They'll sell hard-to-find 
spices, traditional ones and 
blends. 

"Our own brands allow 
us to maintain the quality 
at a better price," Dawson 
says. 

The line of spices is 
an exciting prospect for 
Dawson. 

"That's the start of 
where we want to go," he 
says. "Ultimately, I think 
we look to opening or 
franchising other shops in 
small communities similar 
to Nelson." 




75 min La Stone Massage 
Mini Scalp Massage 



Neck & Shoulder Tension Tamer 

Essential Facial 

Mountain Waters Foot Massag 

Hydro Therapy Tub 

75 min Mountain Waters Massage 



Essential Pedicure 
Paraffin Dip 



>u know what he I ikes... create your 
own spa combination for him, or surprise 
him with a gift certificate! 




Josephine Street Market helps Nelson 



352.3280 • 205 Victoria Street 
www. mountainwaters . ca 




Joyce Jackson 



The summer mar- 
ket under the umbrella 
of the Eco Society has 
been advised that it can 
no longer operate its 
Wednesday market on 
Josephine Street. 

This means the mar- 
ket must find an alter- 
nate location in the 
downtown core or cease to exist in 
its present format. 

We know public markets can 
become the heart and soul of a com- 
munity. It is a place where people 
easily interact and it comes alive 
with social and economic activity. 

But how can markets provide 
tangible evidence of their valuable 
direct and indirect economic impact 
and not be viewed as just a curios- 
ity? 



Money Honey 



The benefits of farmers 
markets have been the 
subject of numerous stud- 
ies in the past few years 
and these studies have 
produced some interest- 
ing factoids. 

In one survey of 800 
customers, 60 per cent 
of market shoppers also 
visited nearby stores on the same 
day. Of those, 60 per cent said that 
they visited those additional stores 
only on days that they went to the 
market. 

A 2006 study in Ontario confirms 
these findings, showing that an over- 
whelming majority of farmer's mar- 
ket customers also visit at least one 
other store on their way to or from 
the market. 

Naturally, as the scale of the mar- 



ket increases, so do the economic 
benefits. 

More of those benefits enjoyed 
through a market include provid- 
ing a local outlet for fresh produce, 
reducing packaging for produce (a 
good environmental choice), helping 
to start new local business, strength- 
ening existing business, job creation 
and innovative new products. 

In addition, locals and tourists 
love to go to open-air markets and 
money spent at markets tends to stay 
in circulation around a community 
longer. 

It would be a shame if our 
Wednesday market were allowed to 
go the way of the dodo for lack of an 
appropriate home. 

The economic and social benefits 
of keeping it in the downtown core 
are sound. 



THE COFFEE'S ON ME. 

PLEASE JOIN ME AT THE NEXT MEETING OF MY COFFEE CLUB. 




Sandra (Sandy) Babin 

Financial Advisor 

420 Victoria St, 
Nelson, BC V1L 4K5 
Bus 250-352-0330 

www.edwardjones.com 

Member CIPF 



Date: June 29, 2007 

Time: 10:00 am 

Location: 420 Victoria Street 



Edwardjones 

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING 



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www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 3 





DAN METZGER R.P.N. , M.A. 

Counsellor 

Professional, Confidential, Experienced 
www.realenrichment.com 

250-352-0108 
dmetzger@realenrichment.com 



CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Diane Holt inspects the drawings for the propsed Kutenai Landing development at the June 5 public meeting at the Best Western Inn 
in Nelson. 





West Kootenay/Boundary 

c 

STOPPERS 

1-800-222-TIPS 

P.O BOX 3392, CASTLEGAR BC V1N 3N8 



Kutenai continued m 



Continued from 
INSPECTED 
on page 1 

accomodate the height 
concerns. 

Instead, developers will 
donate $1,100 per unit to 
a fund the City of Nelson 
has established for afford- 
able housing instead. 

At 139 units, that means 
$150,000, Rink said. 

Councillor Deb Kozak 
wanted to know what 
would bring the afford- 
able housing back. 

"With the costs of hous- 
ing in Nelson being so 
high ... we need to really 
pay attention to creating 
affordability whenever 
we can. 

The $150,000 is a good 
thing, Kozak said, but it 
doesn't match having 10 
units in a building like 
Kutenai Landing. 

From the developer's 
perspective, Rink was 
agreeable to creating the 
10 units, but emphasized 
that is contingent on hav- 
ing six storeys on the 



seniors resident building. 

Marina 

Kutenai Landing is 
more than condominiums. 
The buildings come with a 
marina that would go 475 
feet into Kootenay Lake. 

"We believe the marina 
is an opportunity our buy- 
ers will find attractive," 
Rink said. 

Surveys of the area 
showed the marina had to 
go as far as it does to ensure 
the boats aren't left high 
and dry when the water 
level drops, said Rink. 

Councillor Gord 

McAdams disagreed with 
the developer's assessment 
of how far the marina had 
to extend into Kootenay 
Lake. 

"This part of the lake is 
fairly congested with kay- 
aks, canoes, sailboats and 
powerboats," McAdams 
said. 

Originally the develop- 
ers proposed a 160-slip 
marina but they've cut 
that down to 60 slips for 



boats. 

That sits better with 
McAdams, though he 
noted the developers 
wanted to have six rows 
with 10 slips each stretch- 
ing into the lake. 

McAdams would pre- 
fer 10 rows with six slips 
that wouldn't intrude into 
the lake. 

The councillor feels the 
community and the devel- 
opers have had a good 
discussion about Kutenai 
Landing and its features. 

"I'm confident they'll 
make some movement in 
[the marina] area. Partly 
because it'll save them 
money." 

Other issues 

Pending approval, the 
Kutenai Landing would 
contribute $320,000 
in taxes to the City of 
Nelson. 

That money would 
cover the new mainte- 
nence costs associated 
with the extension of 
Cedar Street from Front 



Street to Lakeside Drive, 
moving a City sewar pipe 
that crosses the property. 
Sections of the marina 
and park within the devel- 
opment would also be 
accessible to the public. 

Timeline 

Should council approve 
the development, con- 
struction would begin this 
year on an underground 
parkade for the first 
building - called "B" - 
along with initial work on 
extending Cedar Street. 

Initial work would also 
begin on the marina. 

Following building 
B, developers would 
build building A and its 
parkade, added onto the 
first underground park- 
ing. Next wouild be build- 
ing C and D, the seniors 
building, though develop- 
ers expect high demand 
for those units could push 
up work on that building. 

Rink predicted the 
entire project would take 
six years to complete. 



Show some pride 

Kootenay Gay Pride needs volunteers to organize this summer's events 



by Chris Shepherd 

Teresa Stebbing wants 
Nelson to have some pride 
and she needs volunteers 
to help make happen. 

Stebbing is with the 
Kootenay Gay Pride 
Committee that organiz- 
ers the annual Gay Pride 
week but few volunteers 
showing up to organize 
mean the event could be 
lacking some pride. 

"When the celebrations 
originally started it was 
more about a reaction 
to oppression," Stebbing 
explains. 

Nelson's first gay pride 
parade was in 1996 and 
there was resistance to the 
event. 

City council at the time 
twice denied Kootenay 
Gay Pride's request to 
hang a banner on Baker 
Street for their Aug. 31, 



1996 parade. 

The justification at 
the time was the banner 
would anger some people 
in the community. 

"Even in Nelson, which 
feels like an accepting 
community, there was 
still homophobia and it's 
worse in other places," 
Stebbing says. 

She thinks part of the 
problem in finding volun- 
teers for this year's pride 
week is people are taking 
acceptance for granted. 

Younger people may 
not realize what had to 
be done to reach the level 
of acceptance enjoyed by 
homosexuals today. 

That acceptance isn't 
universal though. 

"Pride is the antidote 
to shame," Stebbing says. 
"There's a lot of shame 
placed on people from 
parents, teachers and 



religion. To counter that 
shame is why we have 
these parades." 

Name calling, teasing 
and violence still happens, 
Stebbing says, adding 
she's been called names in 
Salmon Arm and Vernon. 

The Nelson parade, 
entering its 11th year, 
is one of the few in the 
region. Spokane's parade 
is the closest, Stebbing 
says, noting Calgary and 
Vancouver's are at least 
in the same country but 
are too far for locals. 

A parade is an opportu- 
nity for people in isolated 
communities to come be 
themselves, Stebbing says, 
and "avoid the daily grind 
of hiding their sexuality." 

The parade also shows 
how many people are gay 
and who accept homosex- 
uality. 

Stebbing says parades 



also show people gays fill 
all walks of life. 

Nelson's gay pride 
parade is an orderly, joy- 
ous celebration, Stebbing 
says. 

"But in order for it to 
happen we need some 
help." 

The week-long celebra- 
tion is run by volunteers 
like Stebbing and is more 
than just a parade. There 
are events for artists, a 
dance, a rally and speak- 
ers. 

Just how many events 
depends on how many 
volunteers show up for 
the planning meetings. 

The next meeting is 
Wednesday, June 20 at 
ANKORS at 101 Baker 
St. 

People with questions 
can e-mail Stebbing at 
kootenaypride@yahoo.ca 
or call her at 505-2115. 




free with any 
Dermalogica facial 
for the month of June 
(while supplies last) 



RENAISSANCE ^ s P a • 555 Baker street • 352 - 1955 



Max ^ Jeweller's 



Design °fthe Week 





"Silver Protector Ring " 

Commissioned by 
Patrick McCrory. 



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Kabbalistic Astrologer 



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Microcosmos Minerals 

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Kootenay Lake 
Learning Centre 

LOOKING FOR AN ALTERNATIVE 

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Page 4 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



EXPRESS 

Pet of the Week 



Tucker 




Have you seen this cat? Tucker has gone missing from the 
Balfour area, June 6. He is a beige tabby and about 12 lbs. 
If you have seen him, please contact Miranda or Paul at 229- 
4174 or 509-0440. He is very sadly missed. 

Is your pet unique and interesting? 

Send a photograph of your pet with a 30 word explanation 

of why your pet stands out from the rest to: EXPRESS 

Community Newspaper, 554 Ward Street, Nelson, BC,VIL IS9 

or email us at express@expressnews.bc.ca. 



Adopt a Pet! 

lL- 352-2228 
HOMES 4 secondchanceadoption.com R I SrlA 

ANIMALS DLJIL/1 

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KOOTENAY CANINES 



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Monday closed 

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Come join the fun at our 

Father's Day Celebration 

^On Sunday, June 17th • 11am till 2pm 
At Lakeside Park 

• Live Music • Kids' Games • Face Painting 

• Free Hot Dogs • Free Oso Negro Coffee 

• See the Firetruck up Close 

• Build a Birdhouse or a Kite 
Everybody welcome • Kootenay Kids.ca 

352 6678 



Illuminating vision 



Organization that helps people with 
vision problems needs financial help 



by Chris Shepherd 

Joyce Schmidt has the 
tools she needs to help 
her live her life like it was 
before she lost much of her 
vision. 

Her watch has a voice 
that tells her what time it 
is. She has a machine, like 
a high-tech CD player, that 
reads to her, and she has 
a white cane, an age-old 
symbol of people that can't 
see. 

Schmidt started losing 
her vision 25 years ago. The 
Nelson woman has retini- 
tis pigmentosa. What that 
means is she can't see to 
the sides, can't see at night, 
and what's left of the world 
is in black and white. 

Some places pose more 
problems than others. 
Brightly lit areas are best, 
dark places are problem- 
atic. 

"Going to a place like 
tha mall, I can't see at all. 
It's too dim," Schmidt 
says. 

She's been taught how 
to cope with her vision 
problems by workers with 
the CNIB - the Canadian 
National Institute for 
the Blind - an organiza- 
tion that counts govern- 
ment funding as only 10 
per cent of its income. The 
rest comes from donations 
and the CNIB is currently 
going raising money to 
conintue to help people 
like Schmidt. 

Alan McCuaig is the 
CNIB worker for the 
Kootenay region. His beat 
extends from the U.S. bor- 
der, north to Golden, east 
to the B.C.-Alberta border 
and west to Rock Creek. 



Essientially McCuaig 
teaches people how to be 
independant. 

The majority of his cli- 
ents are older people who 
have conditions like macu- 
lar degeneration or retinitis 
pigmentosa, like Schmidt. 

McCuaig works with 
his clients - he has 50 in 
the Nelson area alone - on 
how to eat, travel around 
the city an cook among 
many tasks. 

He helps find appropri- 
ate magnifying glasses to 
help people read and keeps 
people informed of the lat- 
est technological develop- 
ments, like Schmidts book 
reader that lets her keep 
up with magazines and 
reading up on health and 
psychology. 

"All that and asking for 
help," he says. "It's just 
part of life. You have to 
ask for help." 

Schmidt admits that was 
one of the hardest things 
for her to learn. 

"It's a hard thing to do at 
first," she says. 

"You overcome it by 
getting into trouble a few 
times," she explains with a 
laugh, recalling an incident 
on Baker Street when she 
was nearly hit by a car. 

That close call - "He just 
missed my toes." - showed 
Schmidt the value of the 
lessons McCuaig had to 
offer. 

The CNIB doesn't 
charge for its services 
which is why the organiza- 
tion is raising money in the 
area this month. 

Go to www.cnib.ca for 
more information on the 
organization. 



^T I mm 



CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Joyce Schmidt has kept some of her independence thanks to 
help from the CNIB. 



Pets teach invaluable lessons 



Pa ws for Thou ght 




Pets offer many lessons to carry on 
through life and people should always 
be aware of them. 

Some of the things 
I have learned in my 
life came from my 
Nikeetah. 

Always eat what you 
are given. Actually, eat 
whatever you may feel 
you should be given. 

Never bite the hand 
that feeds you, unless of 
course you can fake the 
"I did not see your finger" look. 

If you must fight with friends, 
make it fast and don't bother holding 
a grudge. Everyone needs all their 
friends, it's hard to wrestle alone. 

Don't lie, but it might be okay 
to play dumb. Even if your "mom" 
comes home to find red food colour- 
ing all over the carpet and asks all 
three dogs who did it, its OK to 
look at the others. If your paws and 



Keira Coutts 



your mouth are stained red, you're 
busted. 

Always greet those who love you, 
and those you love like 
you have not seen them 
for years. 

Never admit defeat to 
small obstacles, persevere 
until you find a way to 
get the cat poop out of 
the "dog proof" litter dis- 
penser. 

Speak clearly when you 
are talking to the ones you 
love, the softest howl, will make the 
saddest person smile. 

Own your body odour, after all a 
fart like that is something to behold. 

Be gentle to smaller beings, for one 
day they can surprise you and grow 
much bigger. Tibetan Mastiff puppies 
start so small, but thank God for being 
kind to them as pups. 

Note that skunks are void from the 
above rule. If they intrude your yard, 



they must be destroyed, and you must 
get the burning spray out of your eyes 
by wiping it on your peoples' bed. I'm 
pretty sure they were OK with that, 
because they did buy a new bed. 

Enjoy your surroundings and 
explore them because rewards are 
simple and abundant. Beaver skulls, 
femur bones, entire elk spines with ribs 
... share your rewards with everyone 
including people who act as though 
your treasure is disgusting. 

Be yourself and live as though the 
world is your playground, roll in the 
first snowfall, chase birds at the beach, 
sleep upside down beside your person, 
sing to the whole neighbourhood at 
least once a day. 

Open your heart to unconditional 
love, because even though it hurts so 
bad to lose you Nikeetah, I am better 
person for having you in my life. 
Nikeetah Banana, always adored, 
forever loved, never forgotten. 
Feb. 23, 1997 - June 4, 2007 



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www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 5 



Dropping in on fires 

Hanging off of flying helicopters all part of the job for forest firefighters 



by Chris Shepherd 

Hanging off the landing 
skids of a helicopter is usu- 
ally the domain of action 
heroes as they chase down 
the bad guy in the final 
scenes of a movie, but it's 
also a skill the firefighters 
who protect the province's 
forests practice every year. 

Two initial attack 
teams based out of Grand 
Forks were at the Nelson 
Municipal Airport on 
Thursday, June 8, practis- 
ing exits from a hovering 
helicopter. 

Brett McConnell started 
his first season as a forest 
firefighter and Thursday's 
practice was his first time 
exiting a hovering helicop- 
ter. 

"You don't think about 
what it's like," he explains. 
"You just think about what 
you're doing." 

Exiting a hovering heli- 
copter requires careful, 
deliberate movements. 

A sudden shift in weight 
can upset a helicopter and 
pilots appreciate subtle 
movements when hov- 
ering above the uneven 
ground that makes up the 
Kootenay region. 

Jeff Melnychuk has been 
a firefighter for 13 years 
and helped coach the rook- 



ies and refresh returning 
firefighters. 

He's exited hovering 
helicopters countless times 
over the years. 

"It can be exciting," 
Melnychuk said. "The 
machine is moving. The 
rotors are spinning. It cre- 
ates excitement." 

As a team leader it's 
Melnychuk's job to commu- 
nicate with the pilot, telling 
him the moves the exit- 
ing firefighters are doing 
as well as keep an eye on 
how close the helicopter's 
spinning rotors are to trees 
or other hazards. 

The hover exit is used by 
initial attack crews who are 
the first to arrive at a fire. 

Using chainsaws, shov- 
els and water, their job is to 
keep fires small and have 
them contained by 10 a.m. 
the following day upon 
arriving at a site. 

Using a helicopter gets 
them into locations roads 
can't take them, though 
the terrain also means they 
often end up hanging off 
the landing skids. 

There have been 27 fires 
in the South East Kootenay 
Fire Centre this season 
and three in the Kootenay 
Lake area and all three 
local fires were started by 
human activity. 




CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Brett McConnell takes his first crack at exiting a helicop- 
ter while it's still in flight on Thursday, June 8 at the Nelson 
Municipal Airport. 



Briefly 

Celebrate dads 

Sunday, June 17, 11 a.m. to 

2 p.m. at Lakeside Park 

Come to the park with 
your children or on your 
own for a Father's Day 
Celebration. 

There'll be free hot 
dogs and coffee from Oso 
Negro. 

Build a bird feeder, fly 
a kite, check out the fire 
truck, get your face paint- 
ed and enjoy kids games. 

The role of the father 



is forever changing. In 
today's society, dads can 
be providers, homemak- 
ers, role models, play- 
mates, diaper changers, 
and storytellers. Some 
dads do it all; some dads 
do what they can. 

Either way, dads need 
to be celebrated and hon- 
oured for they great job 
they do. 

Whether you are a new 
dad, granddad, foster dad, 
single dad, divorced dad, 
full-time dad, a dad whose 
child is elsewhere or a dad 
whose children are grown, 
all are important to their 



children's development. 

Ground-breaking ceremony 
Monday June IS, 11:30 a.m. 
at Central School at 811 
Stanley St. 

Say goodbye to 
the asphalt at Central 
Education Centre as stu- 
dents, teachers, parents 
and the public celebrate 
breaking ground on a gar- 
den and playing field at 
the Nelson school. 

Phase one is a grassy 
playing field and will be 
done this summer. 

A garden will eventu- 
ally join the field. 



Filling the gap in dental 

care 

Tuesday, June 19, 7 p.m. 

upstairs at the Chamber of 

Commerce Building, 225 

Hall St. 

The Healthy Teeth for 
Healthy Eating project 
is hosting a community 
education event to raise 
awareness and improve 
access to care for people 
with dental problems and 
pain. 

Bruce Wallace, a den- 
tal health advocate, will 
be on hand to talk about 
relevant provincial initia- 
tives. 



Help make cancer history by volunteering 



Help make cancer his- 
tory by becoming an 
office volunteer with the 
Canadian Cancer Society 
in Nelson. 

Use your customer ser- 
vice and communication 
skills to help prevent cancer 
and to support individuals 



affected by cancer. 

Key tasks include fol- 
lowing office procedures, 
receipt writing, and com- 
municating with the pub- 
lic, volunteers, and staff. 
Comfort speaking on the 
telephone is required. 
Computer skills, or the 



willingness to learn, are an 
asset. 

The time commitment 
is three to four hours per 
week. Training and on-going 
staff support are provided. 

To find out more about 
joining the Canadian 
Cancer Society's Volunteer 



team in Nelson contact 
Lynnette Wray by June 
27 at 1-800-656-6426 or 
lwray@bc.cancer.ca. 



Setting it straight 

The photo cutline on page three in the June 6 
issue of the Express incorrectly identified the person 
in the photo. Pictured was Rick Crozier, chairperson 
for the Lions Club Spray Park. 




up to 15 words 
Sumbit free classifieds by Internet 
www.expressnews.bc.ca 




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-market- 250 505 5515 



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HOW YOUR PERSONALITY CAN AFFECT 
YOUR PORTFOLIO'S PERFORMANCE 

Most likely, how you manage your investments reflects 
your personality. Do you procrastinate? React quickly? 
Tend to overanalyze? 

Join us to learn how your behaviour can influence the 
overall performance of your investments - and how this 
can potentially help you avoid mistakes. Our guest is 
Terrance Odean, Ph.D., of the Haas School of Business at 
the University of California, Berkeley, an expert in investor 
behaviour. 

To reserve your seat for this free video presentation, 
call or visit today. 



Date: Tuesday, June 19/07 @ 3:30pm or 5:30pm or 

Monday, June 25/07 @ 12:00 noon (refreshments provided) 
Place: 512 Nelson Avenue, Nelson, BC 




Broadcast in English only. 



Peggy DeVries, CFP 
512 Nelson Avenue 
Nelson, BCV1L2N3 
Bus. 250-352-2254 

www.edwardjones.com/yourpersonality 

Member CIPF 



Edwardjones 

MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING 



Italians celebrate 35 years in Nelson 



The Nelson Canadian Italian Society 
held their Annual Wine Festival on 
Saturday, May 12 at Mary Hall. 

The society also celebrated its 35th 
anniversary as a non-profit organization in 
Nelson. The event sold out to 352 people. 

The Wine Festival was a great suc- 
cess. The winners of the contest red wine: 
third, Rodi De Vuono; second, Rocco 
Mastrobuono; first, Franco De Vuono. 

In the white wine contest Albert Pulice 
came first, Armando Porco second and 



Gabriel Porco third. 

The society also handed out their 
Annual Man of the Year award to Rocco 
Mastrobuono. 

The Nelson Canadian Italian Society 
would like to thank all the members, 
volunteers, staff of Mary Hall, Maglio 
Building Centre for sponsoring the wine 
contest trophies and all the people that 
attended the Annual Wine Festival and 
35th Anniversary of the Society and made 
it a great success. 



South Nelson Elementary 

continues to welcome new 
registrations. 

The school will remain open 
for years. 

The proposed new school 
for the Trafalgar site has not yet been 
approved by the Ministry of Education. 

814 Latimer Street •354-4139 




Page 6 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Where do you vacation when you already 
live in the best place on earth? 




Vancouver Coast & Mountains Fulfill 
Adventure Wishes 

For adventurers seeking an adrenalin-hyped 
vacation, the search is over. From the greater 
Vancouver region to the Sunshine Coast and the 
Fraser Valley, outdoor play runs the gamut from 
rafting to rappelling. 

Squamish, recognized as the 'outdoor recreation 
capital of Canada/ is a hotspot when it comes to 
outdoorsy activities. Rock climbers arrive from all 
over the world to take on the Stawamus Chief. The 
652-metre (2,140 foot) granite monolith, as well 
as other craggy facades, has earned Squamish its 
international reputation among climbers. 
At the head of Howe Sound, windsurfers catch 
phenomenal air - consistently averaging between 
15 and 25 knots. Kayakers skirt up for an ocean 
excursion or Whitewater paddling is possible in 
rivers that range from class ll-IV. The scenery 
is sure to be a stunner while jet boating on the 
Lillooet River, southeast of Pemberton. One can 
surge past spectacular glacial peaks and tradi- 
tional First Nations fishing camps; spot deer, the 
occasional bear, osprey and spawning salmon. 
Some jet boat tours offer the opportunity to visit 
a traditional Coast Salish pit house, or "s7istken" 
(pronounced ee-sh-kin), where adventurers can 
partake in a welcoming ceremony of food-sharing. 
Whitewater rafting is a wild water experience on 
rivers like the Elaho-Squamish, Lower Cheakamus, 
Nahatlatch, Chilliwack and Fraser. Trips on the 
mighty Fraser River are motorized but still a hoot. 
Lytton, where the Fraser and Thompson converge, 
is renowned for Whitewater rafting. 
Hiking opportunities abound in this region. 
Manning Provincial Park's sub-alpine meadows 
are carpeted in wildflowers mid-summer; hiking 
trails range from 30 minute treks to multi-day 
excursions. The park also offers horseback rid- 
ing, swimming, canoeing, freshwater fishing and 
mountain biking. 

And one cannot forget that some adventures take 
root in a campsite. With a myriad of places to 
pitch a tent, playtime can begin at Roberts Creek 
Provincial Park or Saltery Bay Provincial Park on 
the Sunshine Coast, ideal for scuba diving, kayak- 
ing and hiking; Sasquatch Provincial Park near 
Harrison Lake with opportunities to fish, wind- 
surf or fashion sand sculptures; or Alice Lake 
Provincial Park past Squamish where visitors can 
canoe, kayak, bird, hike, and mountaineer. 
To learn more about outdoor adventures in the 
Vancouver, Coast & Mountains Region and to 
get everything you need to plan your vacation 
- where to go, what to see and do, where to stay, 
plus printable maps to show you how to get there 
-visit HelloBC.com/vcm/outdoor. 



Rafting the Nahatlatch River - Tourism British Columbia 



Canoeing Buntzen Lake - Tourism BC/Albert Normandin 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 7 



International Kootenay School opens doors 



The International 
School of the Kootenays 
is ready to offer a full 
B.C. graduation pro- 
gram to Grade 10 to 12 
students as well as indi- 
vidual courses to stu- 
dents enrolled with other 
schools. 

The school's cur- 
riculum submission to 
the superintendent of 
independent schools 
at the B.C. Ministry of 
Education was received 
and approved and so the 
school is being launched 
as a distance learning 
high school. 

This means that stu- 
dents who wish to take 
a course with the school 



can meet graduation 
program requirements 
by taking core founda- 
tion courses or elective 
courses. New B.C. leg- 
islation ensures students 
have a choice of schools 
and programs and so 
have the right to blend 
their program by adding 
courses from distributed 
learning schools. 

Taking courses with 
the school works for peo- 
ple with schedule con- 
flicts or one interested 
in independent explora- 
tion. 

Students can learn 
from the comfort of 
their home with access 
to quality resources and 



with the mentorship of a 
teacher just a phone call 
and e-mail away. 

The distributed learn- 
ing format facilitates 
group learning so they 
can unpack a course 
together while guided by 
a teacher who facilitates 
communication and both 
individual and collabora- 
tive learning. 

Students can interact 
with others from distant 
corners of the globe and/ 
or from their own neigh- 
bourhood. The learning 
community is flexible 
and dynamic. And it is 
so easy to facilitate 

The international 
school is a team of teach- 



ers, researchers, mentors 
and co-learners. 

The school is based 
in liberal arts and peace 
studies. The goal is for 
a high school education 
that is about an expe- 
rience of learning who 
are, what we can do, and 
about our relationship 
to other people and the 
world at large. 

Course selections and 
outlines will be posted 
at their website (www. 
iskhighschool.org) in the 
coming week. 

For more information 
go to their website, their 
blog, www.iskhighschool. 
org/blog, or call (250) 
354 0111. 



It's looking like a green summer 



In addition to the Climate Change: 
Exploring Regional Solutions con- 
ference in late April, the NDP cli- 
mate change meeting in May and 
the biodiesel discus- 
sion that was hosted 
by the Kootenay 
Biodiesel Co-op on 
June 11, there are a 
number of upcoming community 
events that will focus on addressing 
climate change. 

On Wednesday, June 20, the West 
Kootenay EcoSociety is hosting a 
rideshare networking meeting to 
provide Nelson and area residents 
with the opportunity to make con- 
nections for ridesharing and learn 
about local ridesharing resources. 
The meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. 
in the basement of the library (www. 
eco.kics.bc.ca) 

The Wheels for Change Tour is a 
Nelson to Victoria bicycle tour that 



Eco Centric 



Ulli Huber & Mel Reasoner 



will provide British Columbians 
with an opportunity to demonstrate 
commitment to stronger action on 
climate change. The event kicks 
off on June 29 with 
a bicycle decorating 
workshop at Lakeside 
Park from 4 p.m. to 6 
p.m. followed by a pot- 
luck picnic, speeches and music. At 
10 a.m. on Saturday, June 30, the 
tour will start with a bike parade 
through Nelson. Meet at the park- 
ing lot of the Nelson and District 
Community Complex (305 Hall St). 
(www.wheelsforchange.ca) 

In early July (date to be deter- 
mined) Julian Darley, founder of the 
Post Carbon Institute, will be giving 
a presentation in Nelson about his 
organization's work towards free- 
ing society from its dependence on 
fossil fuels. 

The Post Carbon Institute focuses 



on localizing food and fuel produc- 
tion so communities are prepared 
for the inevitable end to fossil fuel 
use. (www.postcarbon.org) 

In September the Nelson-Creston 
Green Party is organizing an event 
looking at the future of food in the 
Kootenays. The event is motivated 
by the unsustainability of our exist- 
ing global food system and the need 
to develop alternatives. Presenters 
include an urban planner, agricul- 
tural economist, local organic dairy 
producer and more. 

It is heartening to see so much 
interest in reducing emissions at 
the local level and the ingenious 
approaches that are taking shape. 

It is also very encouraging to see 
some of our elected representatives 
really beginning to focus on the 
issue. 

This is a great start and we hope 
the momentum continues to build. 



Dr. Ulli Huber and Dr. Mel Reasoner are board members of the West Kootenay EcoSociety and climate 
change scientists. For more information contact the EcoSociety at eco@kics.bc.ca or 354-1909. 

Why build with concrete or steel f 



How come some build- 
ings are built with steel 
frames, while others are 
built with concrete? It 
seems like two- . . ~* *„ 

or three storey Ask Dl\ Science more 
buildings are 
built either 
with steel or 
concrete. Why 
would a build- 
er choose one 
material over 
the other? 




Dr. Christine Humphries 



To answer this question, 
I asked two engineers - my 
husband and my brother- 
in-law - for some help. 
They told me that there are 
a number of reasons for the 
choice of different mate- 
rials: architectural prefer- 
ence, economics, technical 
demands and the design- 
er's familiarity with certain 
types of construction. 

The reason there is a 
choice is that for buildings 
that are only two or three 
storeys, concrete can be 



used as a building material 
for the structural compo- 
nent. 

As a building gets high- 
er it becomes 
onerous 
and expen- 
sive to build 
with concrete 
because it 
weighs more 
and more 
support is 
required. 
With steel, 
its strength to weight ratio 
is much higher, so you can 
build very tall buildings 
with steel (like a skeleton) 
and it will not weigh very 
much. 

Therefore, the reasons 
some builders choose con- 
crete over steel for low-rise 
buildings are based on fac- 
tors other than structural 
requirement. 

For example, technical 
demands may vary depend- 
ing on what the building 
will be used for: if it will 



be a mechanics shop with a 
crane, steel may be a better 
structure. Or, if fire resis- 
tance is needed, concrete 
may be a better choice. 

In fact, for low-rise build- 
ings, just about any materi- 
al can be used to construct 



it (wood, metal, concrete, 
brick, etc.) but as soon as a 
building gets taller steel is 
the best. 

There are exceptions to 
this rule however; the CN 
Tower is constructed from 
poured concrete. 




ESET *| 




Dr. Science is in real life, Dr. Christine Humphries, a 
molecular biologist and resident of Nelson, B.C. Do you 
have a question for Dr. Science? Send it by e-mail to 
express© expressnews. be. ca 



OBITUARY 

A regional artist has died. After severe ill- 
ness, Daniel Paul Morslander, DDan to all 
his friends, resident and ornament of the 
Kootenays for many years, died in KLD Hospital 
at 8:1 5am, Saturday, June 2, 2007, aged 63, after a 
long fight against oesophageal cancer complicated in 
the last week by pneumonia. Many folk visited and 
cared for him, and Anja was a tower of strength and 
patience to the end. DDan was a fine artist, a good 
friend, easy to love, wise, thoughtful, and owning and 
exercising a wicked sense of humour. Many know his 
murals and other art in Nelson, Castlegar, Procter 
and Vancouver. He is survived by a brother, Sal, sis- 
ters Carol, Dottie and Theresa and daughter Dawn, 
all living in the USA. There will be a Celebration of 
his Life on June 23, beginning with a Service and a 
Celebration at 1 0am, at the Procter Hall; and moves 
at 3pm to the Toad Rock Motorcycle Campground. 



Calling for 
clean air 




-«***** » 




&£X *' 



\ Inspiring 
Youth 

for Change 




CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Students from the Nelson area marched through down- 
town on Wednesday, June 6 to call on people to act now to 
improve air quality. 




PPLIED BUSINESS 



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Selkirk S3 College 



Page 8 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Opinions & Letters 



Editorial 



What does the majority want for 
Nelson's waterfront? 



On Monday Nelson 
City council gave the pro- 
posed Kutenai Landing 
development its first two 
readings. 

Next, at a public hear- 
ing on June 21, council 
will hear from the pub- 
lic and then approve or 
deny the condos. 

After such a long 
buildup council will hope- 
fully have the best infor- 
mation at their fingertips 
but one missing tidbit 
is what the majority of 
Nelson's citizens want on 
their waterfront. 

There's been a vocal 
group of people at the 
meetings and the might 
represent what everyone 
thinks or they might be a 
vocal minority. 

It's all guess work 
unless council takes the 
step to do an actual poll 
of Nelson. 

There isn't much time, 
they've set June 21 as 
their deadline to say yes 
or no to Kutenai Landing, 
but this is something that 
should have been done 
months ago. 

Nelson is a democracy 
and the city councillors 



are voted by the people to 
represent their needs and 
in most situations that's 
enough to ensure the peo- 
ple's wants are met. 

Kutenai Landing is 
an important exception 
that requires more direct 
democracy. 

What happens at 
Kutenai Landing will 
happen up and down 
Nelson's waterfront. 

The precedent set by 
Kutenai Landing will 
be cited by every other 
developer who comes to 
Nelson. 

If a poll shows people 
are OK with condomini- 
ums then council can 
approve the development 
with an easy mind. 

If the poll shows other- 
wise, then it's their respon- 
sibility to turn it down. 

Developments like 
Kutenai Landing will 
change the appearance 
of Nelson's waterfront 
and bring some benefits 
and some problems to 
our community. 

The people need a 
concrete voice in shaping 
the waterfront's appear- 
ance. 



SAR season 



Room for many skill levels 



F. Paul Markin, member of Nelson Search and Rescue 



Fish Heads 



& Flowers 




Flowers - The Nelson Food 
Cupboard Society & Heart to 
Heart Community Association 
send flowers to all volunteers, 
food donors and corporate 
sponsors that came togeth- 
er to make the 14th Annual 
Food & Bottle Drive a great 
success. Grateful for your 
contribution 

Fish Heads - To the mechanic 
shop who "fixed" my car for 
a large sum of money. Thanks 
to you my "fixed" car and I 
are on the side of the high- 
way in Balfour, waiting for a 
ride. I will tell others of your 
deceit! Broke and Car-less 

Flowers - to the wonderful 
"lumiere" station volunteers 
at the for the Relay for Life. 
You were so kind to never 
be closed and we late arriv- 
ers are very appreciative. A 
Warm Heart 



Fish Heads - To road cyclists 
in the Blewett area who do 
not speak as they approach 
horses and riders. If you 
approach swiftly and silent- 
ly, say "hello", so the horses 
realize you are human and 
not a predator sneaking up for 
a meal! Spooked too many 
times. 

Flowers - to the amazing 
merchants who allowed my 
sister and daughter to bring 
home outfits for me to try on, 
with only a telephone number 
as collateral, so that I, being 
on crutches, could select 
something in my home for 
a special event. You are the 
reason we should shop in our 
community. Lame but Lovely 

Fish Heads - to the person 
who is taking the flowers I 
have planted at the grave site 
of my beloved son and daugh- 
ter. The cemetery is a place of 
love and respect. Shame on 
you! Moms the Word 



Send us your Fish Heads and Flowers! 

All submissions to the Express Fish Heads and Flowers section will be consid- 
ered provided that no one is identified in the text or signature, all signatures are 
anonymous, and the submission is both concise and written in good taste. We 
reserve the right to withhold publication of submissions if these standards are 
not satisfied. To submit your gift of Fish Heads or Flowers, you may send email 
to express@expressnews.bc.ca, drop off or mail to 554 Ward Street, Nelson, 
B.C., V1L 1S9, or fax to (250) 352-5075. We will not accept submissions over the 
telephone. The Express cannot guarantee that your submission will be printed 
due to space limitation. 



During the summer 
months the mountains 
and water systems in the 
West Kootenay turn into 
a massive green and blue 
playground. Yet this play- 
ground can be a harsh 
environment if a person 
is caught off guard. That's 
what the folks at Search 
and Rescue are for: they're 
like the schoolyard super- 
visors who bandage up 
scraped knees and watch 
for stragglers when the 
bell rings. 

Just like the people they 
rescue, Search and Rescue 
(SAR) members hike, 
climb and enjoy the odd 
beer. Some are highly spe- 
cialized field operatives, 
and others are high school 
students. 

To become a member, 
a person doesn't need to 
know which aspect of Mt. 
Robson receives the most 
weather on a Wednesday 



afternoon. Being a volun- 
teer organization means 
anyone can join, regard- 
less of the number of 
crampons they've owned. 
Physical fitness and hik- 
ing boots are a good start, 
though, as the last thing a 
search manager needs is to 
rescue a floundering team 
member. 

Even though Nelson can 
seem like a place where 
everyone owns a GPS, map 
and compass, there are still 
people who wish they knew 
more about the area so as 
to get out and about; while 
others know their way 
around but don't have a 
partner to get out with. 

These are some of the 
types of people that flour- 
ish in Search and Rescue. 
The weekly practices offer 
a wealth of vital back-coun- 
try information while pro- 
viding a safe atmosphere 
where a person can meet 



like minded people. 

That's why SAR is a shoe- 
in for local youth. What 
better way to end an abu- 
sive day of flipping burgers 
inside a dank kitchen? 

Make no mistake, how- 
ever: being a volunteer 
requires dedication to the 
cause and to the commu- 
nity. Yet at the same time, 
local Search and Rescue 
organizations are equally 
dedicated to their mem- 
bers - for they provide 
training and certification 
in various outdoor exper- 
tise. 

The West Kootenays lay 
claim to a total of eight 
SAR teams: Nelson, Kaslo, 
Nakusp, New Denver, 
Castlegar, Salmo, Beaver 
Valley and Rossland. 

A feel-good way to 
explore during the summer 
months, local SAR team 
information can be found 
online at www.bcsara.com. 



Adopting families 



30 years for support association 



Margaret Tessman, Kootenays adoption support coordinator 



When our family started 
down the road to adopting 
our two children over ten 
years ago, we had many 
questions and concerns. 

How do you tell your 
family you are planning 
to adopt? What are the 
challenges of parenting 
a child from another cul- 
ture? When do you talk 
about adoption with your 
kids? What resources 
are there in the commu- 
nity for adoptive families? 
And what do you say to 
those strangers in the gro- 
cery store lineup who ask 
where your child came 
from? 

Fortunately for us, 
the Adoptive Families 
Association of B.C. had 
the answers to these ques- 
tions and more. We were 
able to access the associa- 
tion's network of support 
volunteers who had "been 
there and heard that" 
before. 

We could attend support 
group meetings and social 
events with other adop- 
tive families to reduce the 
isolation that can come 
with suddenly becoming a 
new parent. And we could 
take advantage of the 



association's bookstore, 
library, bi-monthly maga- 
zine and web site links 
to articles on every topic 
imaginable. Membership 
has its advantages! 

I find it amazing how 
people whose lives have 
been touched by adoption 
often become such pas- 
sionate adoption advo- 
cates. Not only are they 
are committed to spread- 
ing the word about adop- 
tion as a great alternative 
for growing a family, but 
they are willing to take 
on adoption issues in the 
larger world. 

One association mem- 
ber in the boundary 
region is challenging their 
employer to provide the 
same parental benefits 
to adoptive parents that 
are available to birth par- 
ents. Another member is 
providing guidance coun- 
sellors in regional high 
schools with adoption 
information for young 
mothers. A third serves 
on the association's board 
of directors and is plan- 
ning a bicycle trip to raise 
adoption awareness in the 
Kootenays. 

This year the Adoptive 



Families Association 
of B.C. is marking 30 
years of service to adop- 
tive families in British 
Columbia and progress 
toward achieving the goal 
of finding a family for 
every child. 

To help celebrate, we 
will be holding a potluck 
barbecue on Sunday, June 
24 at Crescent Valley Hall 
from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. We'll 
provide the weenies and 
the birthday cake, you 
bring lawn chairs and a 
salad or appetizer to share. 
There is a playground for 
the wee ones and a ball 
field and basketball net 
for more ambitious types. 
Everyone is welcome to 
attend this fun, family 
event. 

For more information 
about adoption in B.C. or 
the work of the Adoptive 
Families Association, 
contact Margaret 

Tessman, Kootenays 
adoption support coor- 
dinator, 1-866-884-2224 
(toll free) or e-mail 
mtessman@bcadoption. 
com. Tell someone today 
that over 1,000 children 
in B.C. are waiting for a 
family. 



Letters to the Editor 

We encourage our readers to write to us. Please address letters meant for publication to the 
Editor. We do not accept open letters. Letters must be short (200 words maximum) and to the 
point. 

We reserve the right to edit letters, and the decision to publish or not to publish is completely at 
the discretion of the Editor and Publisher. Commentaries can be longer (500 words maximum) and 
are more in-depth than letters. If you wish to write a commentary, please first contact the Editor. 

All letters and commentaries must be signed and include your name, address and phone number. 
We will not print "name withheld" letters. Opinions in the Express are not necessarily those of the 
publisher or the Express advertisers. 



Street 
Talk 



What should 
be the 
height limit 
to building 
on the 
waterfront? 






Two storeys, that's it. 

We have a beautiful 

waterfront, that all 

should be able to see. 

Also there is a safety 

issue because of the 

airport. 

Dee O'Hara, 
South Slocan 




I think the waterfront is 
already over developed. 
New development 
should be no more than 
3 storeys. I don't think 
the waterfront should 
be blemished by tall 
buildings. 

Shawna Walker, 

and Angel the dog, 

Nelson 




I'm all for densification. 
I think three to four 
storeys is the maximum 
for the waterfront. It 
would be nice to see 
drawings and plans from 
several perspectives to 
give a realistic idea of 
what views would be 
affected. 

Shawn Tasker, 
Nelson 



ADVERTISING: Andrea Miller 

ADMINISTRATION: 
Serene Stewart, Marina Kiborn 

PRODUCTION: Laura Duncan 

DISTRIBUTION: Gene Schmunk 

ISSN 1196-7471 

The Express Newspaper is owned by 

Kootenay Express Communication Corp. 

Publications Mail Agreement 

#0654353. Paid at Nelson, B.C 




PUBLISHER Nelson Becker 



EXPRESS 

ratri coujui/Nrrir hi wsntik 

PHONE (250) 354-3910 

FAX 352-5075 EMERGENCY CELL 354-9001 

express@expressnews.bc.ca 

554 Ward St. Nelson, B.C. V1L 1S9 




J^O 



r **Z& 



f Association 



w 



EDITOR Chris Shepherd 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 9 



Sveat£ o^ Sfinivtty 



Our goal this year is to raise 
$58,000 to purchase a 
Digital Processor for the new 
Operating Room at Kootenay Lake 
Hospital. A camera and light source 
in one, this equipment is used during 
gastrointestinal scope procedures 
such as colonoscopy and gastros- 
copy. The Digital Processor projects 
the images from the scope to a flat 
panel screen, which provides the 
endoscopist a real time image as 
the scopes are passed through the 
intestinal tract. 

An average of 8 scope procedures 
are performed at Kootenay Lake 
Hospital each week, enabling a large 
portion of people, from young adults 
to seniors, to access this diagnostic 
technology in our own community. 
A colonoscope is useful in detecting 



illness affecting the colon, such as 
Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. The 
procedure involves a flexible scope 
that is fed into the lower bowel. The 
scope contains a camera system, 
which is connected to a television 
screen, via the Digital Processor, 
for visualization of the lower bowel. 
Magnified pictures of the colon are 
viewed on the screen, allowing the 
endoscopist to remove polyps, cau- 
terize bleeding lesions within the 
colon, or biopsy suspicious areas to 
diagnose or rule out benign or malig- 
nant bowel conditions. 

Colorectal cancer is the third most 
common malignancy in Canada, 

and the second most frequent cause 
of cancer death. The incidence of 
this cancer is rising steadily after the 
age of 50, and each year more than 



700 British Columbians die from it. 
The majority of colon cancers arise 
from polyps, which are often asymp- 
tomatic but can be readily identified 
and removed during the colonos- 
copy procedure. It is estimated that 
the time taken for a small adenoma 
(polyp) to develop into a cancer is 
three years, and in most cases much 
longer. Removal of these adenomas 
has been demonstrated to reduce 
colon cancer mortality and, while 
a colonoscopy is only one of sev- 
eral evaluations important in iden- 
tifying individuals who may harbor 
such disease, the removal of polyps 
is both diagnostic and therapeu- 
tic. For more information on cancer 
screening opportunities or diagnosis 
of other gastrointestinal disorders, 
contact your family physician. 



Please support the purchase of this important piece of medical equipment 
by contacting the Foundation office or sending your donation to: 

Kootenay Lake Hospital Foundation 
3 View Street, Nelson, BC V1L 2V1 

354-2334 bryna.idler@interiorhealth.ca 
www.kootenaylakehospitalfoundation.com 

The Heart of Healthcare in the Community 



2007 

COAL 
$58,000 



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Thanks for sharing your special memories and photos! The prize winner is Peter Shukin. 
Come by the Express office, 554 Ward Street to collect your Turtleback Adventure prize information. 

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to date 

$32,455 




Page 10 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



Let fishing set its hooks in you 



Saturday, June 16 and Sunday, June 17 from 
8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Cottonwood Lake 

The Nelson District Rod and Gun 
Club in conjunction with the B.C. 
Wildlife Federation will be hosting the 
5th Annual Fishing Forever and Family 
Fishing Days. 

Fishing Forever came into existence 
in 1992. It was the brainchild of Walt 
Liimatainen after he had been diagnosed 
with a progressive muscle disease. He 
loved to fish but could no longer do so 
on his own. He realized there must be 
others in the same situation. He decided 
to organize an event where all mobility 
challenged individuals could go fishing. 
As a member of the BCWF, he saw the 
federation as a perfect vehicle for accom- 
plishing this goal. With their help this 
program has evolved into a most worth 
while event held in many communities 
throughout B.C. 

The Nelson District Rod and Gun 
Club will provide experienced volunteers 
and anglers to assist everyone, but care- 
givers should be available where need- 



ed. Participants from the Brain Injury 
Association, group homes, CNIB, seniors 
residences and senior groups have already 
made plans to attend. We will provide the 
manpower, equipment and fishing knowl- 
edge for both days but if you have a favou- 
rite fishing rod please bring it along. 

Volunteers will be cooking up a 
storm on the barbecue providing food 
and refreshments all day at no charge. 
Entertainment, handouts, prizes, hats and 
t-shirts will be awarded participants. 

There will be a temporary wheelchair 
accessible ramp and wharf for easy access 
into the boats. The rod and gun club is 
actively pursuing the construction of a 
permanent wharf at Cottonwood Lake 
for all mobility challenged individuals. 
Temporary washroom facilities will also 
be on site. 

During this weekend, all residents of 
Canada can go fishing in most of B.C.'s 
many lakes and non-tidal streams, com- 
pliments of the province. You do not need 
to purchase or carry a freshwater fishing 
license. 



Childcare resource program 
retains some funding, some hours 



The staff at the 
Childcare Resource and 
Referral (CCRR) program 
announce they've received 
ongoing funding and are 
able to continue providing 
community events and ser- 
vice for childcare providers 
and families. 

Earlier this year it 
appeared funding would 
be reduced and eventu- 
ally cut altogether, but 
protests restored the fund- 
ing, though it was still 
reduced. 

Reduced staffing, 

reduced hours of operation, 
and some service modifica- 
tion are a result of the 38 
per cent cut they received 
in funding levels this year. 

The CCRR provides 
support for caregivers who 



are on their registry. 

Its Outreach Services 
extend to up the valley to 
Nakusp, to Kaslo, the East 
Shore, Nelson area and 
Salmo. 

This program supports 
caregivers who work in iso- 
lation and for long hours 
day after day. CCRR staff 
provide consultations, 
home visits, toys, equip- 
ment, information, newslet- 
ters, resources, workshops 
and training. 

CCRR support also 
extends to families. Its 
referral service links fami- 
lies to childcare providers 
and assists families with the 
subsidy program. 

For a $25 annual fee, 
families can access the 
program's library with edu- 



cational toys, books, activ- 
ity packs, theme boxes and 
more. 

The library is a fam- 
ily friendly place offering a 
peaceful environment with 
toys for children to play 
with while parents browse. 

The program runs 12 
p.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, 
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday 
to Thursday and is closed 
on Saturday and Sunday, 
though they will be open 
one evening and one 
Saturday per month, dates 
to be announced. 

For more information 
please call 352-0407 or drop 
by the program at 518 Lake 
Street in Nelson. 

The CCRR is a program 
of the Kootenay Kids agen- 
cy. 



How to fix mouldy attics 



Home Front 




Steve Cannon, Chris Morris 
& Bill Lynch 



We own a house that was 
built in 1929. Someone who 
owned the house before 
us insulated the attic with 
vermiculite. I am going 
increase the insulation lev- 
els a lot. So I went up there 
to measure the area for the 
amount of fibreglass batts 
I will need. What I discov- 
ered is a lot of white mould 
on the roof boards. I think I should clean 
it up before I re-insulate, but I'm not sure. 
Is there another way to deal with it? 

Attics in older homes often have 
problems with mould and mildew. Back 
in the day, when there was no insulation 
in your attic, this attic space probably 
functioned quite well. That's not to say 
that the insulation is entirely to blame 
for the problem. 

Originally though, the attic was not 
isolated from the interior air so it was 
part of one contiguous breathing space 
that aspirated to the outdoors. The rising 
hot air from the building pushed through 
the attic and roofing to the outside and all 
was well (except the heating costs). 

Once insulation was introduced to 
this space, it sealed and separated the 
attic from the living area 
below. Nobody con- 
sidered that the attic 
had to breathe, so it 
changed into a hot and 
often humid area, full of 
trapped dead air. 

To compound the 
problem, a vapour barrier 
is often mistakenly omit- 
ted when older attics are 
insulated. So, the humid- 
ity from the hot, humid 
interior air condenses on 
the roof boards because 
it is not prevented from 
entering the attic by a 
vapour barrier. 

Fortunately, some- 
times the ceilings of 



Be careful not 
to disturb the 
vermiculite in your 
insulation because 
it may containe 
traces of asbestos. 



older houses are well sealed 
with layers of old oil based 
paints. These layers of paint 
often save old attics that have 
been retrofitted with insula- 
tion, from the mould you are 
now dealing with. 

The key to the whole 
problem is to introduce 
lots of fresh circulating out- 
door air through your attic. 
Unfortunately, most older homes do not 
have soffit vents. 

However, you can easily install manu- 
factured round soffit vents in drilled 
holes. These soffit vent plugs are readily 
available at you local building supply 
store. Install 38 mm vent plugs on 300 
mm centres. 

More is always better than less when 
it comes to attic venting. Before you 
install the new insulation, ensure these 
vent plugs allow air flow into the attic by 
installing insulation baffles ("mor vents") 
between each rafter bay in the attic. 

Then, install large gable end vents. 
These vents allow the fresh air drawn 
through the soffits to escape and carry 
off any heat and moisture that could 
provide an environment for mould 
growth in your attic. 

Then, it may not 
be critical to attempt a 
lengthy clean up of the 
existing mould. Without 
a hot humid environment 
the existing mould will no 
longer flourish. 

When working in your 
attic, be careful not to dis- 
turb the vermiculite insu- 
lation because it may con- 
tain traces of asbestos. 

Wear a good quality 
respirator and leave your 
shoes and coveralls in the 
attic before you come 
back into the living area 
to avoid the potential for 
transfer of contaminants 
to your living quarters. 



Steve, Chris and Bill are building consultants with Lynch Building Inspection Services 

Ltd. of Nelson. Do you have a question for Home Front? Send it by e-mail to 

express© expressnews. be. ca. 



What is the single, 

most effective thing 

you can do about 

climate change? 




Nelson & Area 

Rideshare 



Transportation is the greatest personal 
contributor to climate change. Whether 
you're commuting to the Valley or from 
the North Shore, or going to Vancouver, 
put one or two more people in your car. 
You'll cut your emissions by half or more. 

List your ride today. 

www.nelsoncar.com 










FORTISBC 



tip* 



Selkirk Veterinary 
Hospital 



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www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 11 



Fashion 



Cottons will keep you comfortable and looking great 



this week, 
a commu- 



Our model 
Vivienne, is 
nity support 
worker and 
spends most 
of her time 
at work. For 
the occasion- 
al night on 
the town, she 
is looking for 
something 
a little fun 
and flirty. Style solutions 
question of the week: 
How can we create a look 
that will be comfortable 
and still look amazing 
in? 

The ladies at Cottons, 
located 390 Baker St., 
specialize in natural, 
breathable clothing (as 
well as therapeutic shop- 
ping). 

They are warm, friend- 
ly and draw you in with 
their big hearts. 

Vivienne found an out- 
fit that is a perfect fit. 
The Gilmore, floral print 
skirt ($54), is Canadian 
made and 100 per cent 
cotton. 




Svetlana Bell 



An A-line skirt was 
chosen to allow for move- 
ment and the 
Style Solutions iength shows 
off the great 
lines of her 
legs. 

The white 
100 per 

cent cotton 
Autrechose 
tank ($20) 
pairs perfectly 
with the outfit, giving it 
versatility. 

Vivienne has a longer 
torso and has the ability 
to wear a scoop, round or 
V-neck neckline. 

A Cabri, stretch denim 
jacket ($78) adds a classic 
look. This denim blazer 
flatters her body type by 
defining her narrow waist 
with fitted darts. The 
length of the blazer falls 
just below the widest part 
of the hip, adding balance 
to the outfit. 

This is a look that can 
easily go from daytime 
into nighttime. 

Finer hair like 
Vivienne's can eas- 



ily weigh itself down. By 
adding layers to the hair- 
cut it supports the hair in 
holding more volume. 

Creating longer last- 
ing volume can also be 
achieved by adding a bit 
of product to the hair and 
blow-drying it upside- 
down. 

The overall colour was 
brightened and lightened. 
Natural blonde, foil high- 
lights and a full medium 
blonde colour creates a 
fresher look. Vivienne has 
natural curl in her hair 
which is great for creating 
more than one style. Her 
hair can be worn straight 
or she can change the 
look by scrunching in the 
curl. 



STYLE 


SOLUTIONS 


TIP OF THE WEEK 


The best way to tell 


if you have found the 


right outfit is by the 


way you feel when you 


wear it. 



Svetlana Bell is the owner of Front Street Hair Studio. She has over 14 years experience as a stylist and is a 
certified member of the Cosmetology Industry Association of British Columbia. 



In partnership with some of the 
local businesses, we are looking 
for nominees and volunteers to be 
chosen to have practical style ques- 
tions answered. 

Are you starting a new hobby 
and need expert advice on what 
to wear? Do you know a fashion 
disaster in need of help? Are you 



stylishly outdated and need a new 
look? Is there a special event fast 
approaching and you have yet to 
find an outfit? 

To participate in Style Solutions, 
you may volunteer yourself or 
nominate someone else. All shapes, 
sizes, ages and genders welcome. 
It's all for fun. 




Each model will be outfitted 
with a new look, as well as receiv- 
ing a hair makeover or style (if 
applicable) and will receive a $50 
gift certificate from the participat- 
ing store. 

To participate, or nominate 
someone you know contact the 
Express at express@expressnews. 
bc.ca 



Collaborate 
Law Croup of 

SON 



ALTERNATIVE Dl^P-JTJ 



Lawyer Mediators 

Cwitect Us: 
www.n mwi ita 

(250) 354-1SS1 



Helping to BmlgF DiftrencH 



K00TENAY 
CO-OP RADIO 

is seeking a 

SPONSORSHIP 
COORDINATOR 

to sell business spon- 
sorships in Nelson area 
20 hours per week, 
combination wage and 
commission 

Start date 
July 2, 2007 

For job description 
and further details go 
to www.kootenaycoo- 
pradio.com. Apply to 
bill@cjly.net or to Box 
767 Nelson, V1L 5R4 

Application 
deadline: Monday, 
June 18, 5 pm. 



vepj hush hush 




lUM &oe& <$ad need 

sieii^A/eA&? 

Shoe Boutique 
564 BAKER STREET • 352*1617 



A osMb* srsbtiilfy, jeurftettf, wmnfot, ksm Awywart* 
Located on Herridge Lane beside the All Seasons Cafe. 







354-4622 

Toll free 1-877-GERICK 
702 Baker Street, Nelson, BC 



"BOMBI TEAM PURSUIT" 

Sunday, June 24 

• ONE YEAR FREE SERVICE 
when you buy NEW a bike 

• THREE PAYMENTS 

no interest on all new bikes 

• KNOWLEDGEABLE staff 

• CUSTOM FITTING 

of road bikes 

• GROUP RIDES & BIKE MAPS 

• CYCLYST INFORMATION centre 



J |^i-z:eld- 



in (jail 



en 



opening 

June 1 ^ 



i 1 



specializing in lo Colli) criirtcd 

home f urn i shinap and gifts 

352-o£<$o 

h a zcl d ca nga I \c ry @gm a i! . com 



Live Local 

Located in the Nelson Trading Company 



Page 12 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Arts & Entertainment 







SUNDAYS 

MONDAYS 

TUESDAYS 

WEDNESDAYS 

THURSDAYS 

SATURDAYS 



The Truman Show (brunch) • Nikko (evening) 

Sarah McGlynn & Rich Rabnett 

Cliff Maddux & Friends 

Paul Landsbers & Bert Peters 

Rob Johnson & Friends 



Nelson's Live Jazz Venue 
Library Lounge 
6pm-iopm 



AV 



Hume Hotel 



- 2nd & 4th Saturday of each month 
features the incomparable Hume Quartet 

NEIAON'S HERITAGE HOTEL SINCE 1898 



int 



bDc3f 



• WEDNESDAY 13 th Blues Night featuring 

Big Bad Blu 

• THURSDAY 14 th Block Party featuring 

DJ Bryx & Mr. Smith 

• FRIDAY 15 th 80's Party in Front 

70's Party in Back 

• SATURDAY 16 th McCuaig 



World music via Quebec 




DobaCaracol 

Tuesday, June 19 at Club 198 at 198 Baker St. 

DobaCaracol is a six-member world-music group 
delivering a unique blend of African, reggae, pop, and 
funk influences mixed with beautiful, enchanting and 
hypnotic harmonies with a strong feminine touch. 

Singing in French, English and other languages, this 
Quebecois band blend global influences together in 
a completely original manner. At times soft and sen- 
sual, at others frantic and frenzied, DobaCaracol is an 



exotic treat for the ears. 

DobaCaracol has reached Top 10 in Quebec and 
Top 40 in Canada with their album SOLEY in 2005. 
This past year, DobaCaracol has toured in Africa, 
Mexico, France, UK, Germany, Japan, Australia and 
New Zealand. This tour will be their first time to 
B.C. 

This evening is also a benefit for the seventh annual 
Koots Roots Culture Festival, Aug. 24-26. Get $20 off 
on your three-day pass, this night only. 



Briefly 



The Joey Only Outlaw 

Band 

Friday, June 15 at The 

Royal on Baker 

Joey initially started 
touring by going solo, 
stompin' an' whistlin' an' 
playin' a harmonica. 

He stole hundreds of 
songs about all sorts of 
vile and wretched things 
but he also writes and 
when he does it's about 



really political or radical 
stuff. 

Sometimes he has been 
a protester, and has gone 
so far that he went to go 
to jail for his beliefs. 

Now he mostly prefers 
to keep a good proba- 
tion record so he plays 
with his six piece bad-ass 
band of outlaws and they 
incite all sorts of mad- 
ness upon the masses. 

The Joey Only Outlaw 
Band's music is their 
revenge on society, you'll 
understand, in time. 



Eventually their mes- 
sage will be heard. There 
is no limit to the Outlaw 
Band's ambition and you 
can bet they'll be rocking 
this town harder than a 
pack of wild stallions. 

Salsa and Samba Dance 

Workshop 

Saturday, June 16, 3 p.m. 

to 6 p.m. at The Moving 

Centre at 533 Baker St. 

Explore the roots and 
rhythmic essence of Afro/ 
Cuban salsa and samba 
dance in this two-part 



workshop and inspire 
your dance passion and 
individual style. 

Students learn the 
basics and footwork 
embellishments of samba 
and salsa dance. 

Come on your own, no 
partner necessary. The 
salsa class starts at 3 p.m. 
and the samba class 4:45 
p.m. 

$40 pre-registration, 
$45 at door. Call Erin 
Thomson at 354-3954 for 
more information. 



\t C$#A 



SDaDLDLTDCa? 

GDOoans 




gmrrfK|7f]i1°^rjTrn 



rfforltei 





Briefly 



Higher Ground 

Saturday, June 16, 7 p.m. at 

the Capitol Theatre 

Higher Ground cel- 
ebrates mountain culture 
through the eyes of world- 
class climbers. The film 
focuses on these climbers' 
drive to explore, their pas- 
sion for the mountains and 
the climbing lifestyle. 

From big wall first 
ascents in Zion, Utah to 
winter alpine ascents in 
the Canadian Rockies to 
big wall ski descents in 
coastal British Columbia, 
Higher Ground spotlights 
some of the continent's 
most inaccessible ter- 
rain and the people who 
thrive there. A lens into 
their boundary-breaking 
passion illustrates what 
mountain culture is: an 
obsession. 

Filmmakers Chris 
Alstrin and Alex Lavigne 
team up for this ground- 
breaking production, 
which takes the viewer on 
a journey of breathtaking 
cinematography and true 
insight into the climbers 
way of life. 

Top-ranked climb- 
ers appearing in Higher 
Ground include: Ines 
Papert, Audrey Gariepy, 
Guy Lacelle, Sean Isaac, 
Josh Wharton, Mike 
Anderson, John Chilton, 
Shawn Huisman, Rob 
Pizem, Phil Gruber, 
Andrew Querner, Scott 
Semple, Rob Owens and 
more. 

The Experiment 
Saturday, June 16 at The 
Royal on Baker 

The Experiment is hot! 
The line-up is the best of 
Nelson's finest musicians 
coming together, feel- 
ing the vibe, and building 
community around music. 

Bootys are shakin', the 
floor's vibratin', and the 
talent ain't fakin'. 

Check out what every- 
one is talking about, as the 
ever surprising line-up of 
all-stars take the stage. 

It feels like the best 
house party ever! 



Prairie Flyer 

Tuesday, June 19, 8 p.m. at 
the Nelson United Church, 
602 Silica St. 

The Prairie Flyer is an 
old-time American train, 
diesel-powered on a trans- 
continental route from the 
past to the present, most 
often found flying across 
the prairie under a full 
moon. 

Prairie Flyer is an eclec- 
tic collection of high-pow- 
ered musicians who like to 
travel non-stop across the 
boundaries of bluegrass, 
folk & Americana - all on 
the same trip. 

This group from eastern 
Washington believe that 
honest music and tight 
harmony will transport us 
just about anywhere. 

They play bluegrass 
standards (old ones and- 
soon-to-be-new ones) folk 
and rock and roll that 
won't hurt. In short, a wide 
variety of original songs, 
classics, freshly interpret- 
ed & reconstructed tunes. 

Opening the night is 
Little Bit Bluegrass. 

Tickets are $15 for 
adults, $7 for youth ages 
12 to 19 and younger kids 
are free when they're with 
an adult. Pick them up at 
Eddy Music and Packrat 
Annie's or call (250) 352- 
2704. 

Urban Gladiators 
Tuesday, June 19 at The 
Royal on Baker 

Tuesday is the perfect 
night to give you energy 
to get on with the rest of 
the week. 

With Monday under 
your belt and hump day 
coming up, why not get 
out and hear some great 
live music? 

There's no better ener- 
gy building fuel than the 
ever-changing, ever-popu- 
lar Urban Gladiators' line- 
up of eclectic talent. 

From beat poetry to 
hip-hop to rock'n'roll, and 
beyond, it's a grab bag 
of surprise delights from 
month to month, with 
local artists emerging and 
converging to spread their 
music and joy. 



WINE 
IKIT'Z 



FATHERS' DAY- GIVE HIM THE GIFT OF CALM! 



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www. mountainwaters . ca 



SUMMER 
SAVI NGSI 

June 18-23,2007 

Save 15% 

when you purchase any In-stock Country Misr, 

Wine-Ait or Specialty Serte* wine Mtl 
m Fnrt St, Hfllaan » 352-5423 ■ wfKwnlHzjHn 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Arts & Entertainment 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 13 




CHRIS SHEPHERD 

Artist Stewart Steinhauer and local Howie Ross check out the Mother Bear, a sculpture Steinhauer made after he was inspired by a 
boulder on Ross's property in Taghum. 

Local rocks 
bear artistic fruit 

Alberta artist brings latest sculpture to Nelson to share with the local who inspired it 



Briefly 



DJLove 

Saturday, June 16 at Club 

198 at 198 Baker St. 

DJ Love began his 
career in Dallas, Texas 
and was trained as a clas- 
sical pianist and violinist 
and augmented his skills 
by learning the guitar and 
drums. 

From the start, this 
musical training gave him 
strength as an electron- 
ic composer. Electronic 
music fascinated him as a 
means of expressing raw 
emotion through beats, 
breaks and bass lines. 

In 1992, he began a 
four-year residency in 
Rome and by 1996 he 
acquired his own studio 
and label Stellar Music. 
This DJ has been spread- 
ing his Love globally 
from Bangkok, London, 
Toronto to Washington, 
D.C. and will be making 
his way to Nelson. 

Mr. Feeley and the Touch 
Thursday, June 14, at 
Finleys Irish Pub 

There promises to be 
a night of high intensi- 
ty music with a unique 
and hard-hitting touch. 
Special guests will help 
Mr. Feeley and the Touch 
make this a summer tour 



kickoff party you won't 
soon forget. 

There will be drink spe- 
cials and a $5 cover. 

Music starts at 9 p.m. 

DJs Contra, Ajax, Moch 1, 
and D-Frag 

Thursday, June 14 at The 
Royal on Baker 

DJs Contra, Ajax, 
Moch 1, and D-Frag got 
together with hard hitting 
breaks and drum'n'bass 
for a night of loud and 
proud tunes. 

All are consummate 
DJs with their souls sunk 
into the flavours they spin 
This is the kind of night 
that will have you rever- 
berating for a week and 
thanking yourself for the 
release, so be sure to sup- 
port these brilliant rebel 
rousers. 

$3-5 sliding scale. 

Cottonwood Falls Market 

music 

Saturday, June 16, 10:30 

a.m. to 2 p.m. at the 

Cottonwood Falls Market 

Kyla Hanna warms 
up the morning with her 
own style and is followed 
by Dan Perrault with his 
bluegrass band. Covering 
the classics and his origi- 
nal work, Perrault is sure 
to get you feeling that 
good old, down home toe- 
tappin' music. 



by Chris Shepherd 

The 8,100 pound bear 
on Baker Street last 
week owed its existence 
to a local boulder. 

Stewart Steinhauer 
sculpted the granite fig- 
ure after seeing a boulder 
on Howie Ross' property 
in Taghum. 

Ross and Steinhauer 
have been friends since 
the '70s when they 
worked on a ranch near 
Vernon. Steinhauer was 
visiting Ross last sum- 
mer when the sculptor 
was inspired by the boul- 
der. 

"He could see the bear 
in there," Ross recalls. 



Steinhauer planned to 
carve the form out of the 
rock as part of a pub- 
lic process, but when the 
time came to take a saw 
to the boulder, it all fell 
to pieces. The saw that 
is. The rock was too hard 
for Steinhauer's equip- 
ment and he couldn't 
work on it. 

"It just ate the saw," 
the sculptor recalls. 

But the notion of 
the bear stayed and 
Steinhauer found a suit- 
able piece of granite 
which he used to create 
the sculpture he brought 
to Nelson last week. 

Steinhauer was tak- 
ing the sculpture along 



to spread its message 
while he took some other 
sculptures to a customer 
in B.C. 

It was Ross' first time 
seeing the sculpture. "It's 
quite touching, actually." 

The large bear rep- 
resents the Mother 
Bear spirit, Steinhauer 
explains. 

"Mother Bear is an 
essential grandmother 
spirit and her responsi- 
bility is helping keep the 
earth well." 

The bear is focused on 
the earth at her feet and 
Steinhauer's intent is to 
draw the viewer's gaze to 
the earth as well. 

The state of the envi- 



ronment today is always 
on Steinhauer's mind and 
he hopes the sculpture 
will get people thinking 
as well. 



REDFISH 
GRILL 



NEW 

SUMMER 

MENU 



Briefly 



An Evening of Story Telling 
Tuesday, June 19, at 
Oxygen Art Centre, 
alley entrance behind 
Hippersons Hardware 

Have your funny bones 
tickled or your skin break 
out in goosebumps, but 
more importantly, let 
your heart be touched 
and have your spirit 
dance in enchantment 
with gifted story teller 
Thomas Atum O'Kane. 

An evening not to be 
missed if you want to 
come away feeling larger, 
uplifted, empowered and 
in remembrance of who 
you really are. 

$8 at the door. 



Mclntyres images at Max 
and Irma's 

Ongoing show at Max and 
Irma's Restaurant at 51 5 A 
Kootenay St. 

Photo artist Janet 
Mclntyre is once again 
displaying her images 
at local restaurants and 
other venues. 

All works are for sale 
and her work can also 
be seen at Touchstones 
Nelson and Kutenai 
Clothing. 

For more information 
call (250) 399-0068 or e- 
mail jemphotoart@shaw. 
ca. 

DJ Stickybuds 

Friday, June 15 at Club 198 

at 198 Baker St. 

Tyler Martens is DJ 



Stickybuds, a Kelowna- 
based Breaks DJ who 
sold his '79 Cadillac 
Coupe Deville four years 
ago to buy DJ gear. 

His love of everything 
from breaks to funk and 
reggae, drum 'n' bass 
and hip-hop is expressed 
through his unique party 
style. 

With two Shambhala 
performances under his 
belt, a regional DMC 
turntablist championship 
title, Stickybuds has per- 
formed alongside some of 
the finest in the indus- 
try such as Moses Mayes 
and Wassabi Collective. 
Stickybuds will be per- 
forming his new album 
The Hot Butter Rub. 




Page 14 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 




Successful Kids Grow Up 

to Be Successful Adults 



News 





Match the children above witti their adult pictures below. 

Send your entry to Stars for Success, 5 IS Lake St Kelson VH 4C6 

or email 1o kim@successby6wk.com 

CONTEST CLOSES JUNE 25 



starsfor 
success 

Help a Child Fee^peciall 



Stooge c^m 



Success By 6 te presently raising funds For our Stars for Success program. 

Sfors for Success sponsor! children up to their 6th birthday, who without your 
help would nol be able to take part in community sports. re-creaIion P early 

learning or arts programs, 

Donate to Stars for Success today, Go to www.sE/ccessby^w^cGm or drop your 

donation off at your local credit union. To And out more, go to 

www. succ e j sby6 wk.c o m 










Ian 
CttOenKear 



afar 



- I - 








Dr. Cr*np*4 
mu*^n*ria 

-■frCiJT-iZIL ■ 



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i C-iKrposa' 



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Scenting AjW 



JonftDo^ity 

Cltp-cHNobon 



Dwnei 




UCCESS MY 




1 1H|'1-K -■■■ illrlTs^l-^EiilVil 1 1 if* 1 



?■ . ■■ ■ 
rriiif i 






Q. 



Young 
stars 
become 
adult stars 



by Chris Shepherd 

Sports work the mind 
as much as they work 
the body, Kim Adamson 
says. That's why it's 
important children play 
games at a young age, 
she says. 

Adamson is one of 
the co-ordinators for the 
Success By 6 program in 
the region that focusses 
on developing a child's 
emotional, social, cogni- 
tive and physical skills 
they'll need before start- 
ing school. 

She, along with Kate 
Skye, the other local co- 
ordinator, created Stars 
for Success, a program 
within Success By 6. 

The new program 
focusses on helping par- 
ents send their kids to 
sports programs. 

"Studies have found 
children in low income 
families don't have access 



to sports programs," 
Adamson explains. 

Sports help children 
develop socially and 
emotionally, Adamson 
says. "They're used to 
being around other kids 
and they're used to shar- 
ing." 

With that in mind, 
Adamson and Skye cre- 
ated the Stars for Success 
program last year. 

The program provides 
funding for families that 
need help with sports 
costs, Adamson says, 
and they've sponsored 
225 children in their first 
year. 

June is Adamson and 
Skye's main month to 
raise money and they'll 
be working to get kids 
active and socialized 
around town. 

Call Adamson at 352- 
6786 for questions about 
either of these pro- 
grams. 



Business 



New Nelson boutique 



The Lilikoi Studio and 
Boutique will be opening 
on Friday, June 15 at 358 
Baker Street (formerly 
Diva's cafe). 

An opening celebration 
will be held from 5 p.m. to 
9 p.m. 

Lilikoi is the cloth- 
ing line created by local 
designer and Kootenay 
School of Arts graduate 
Barbara Boswell. 

Lilikoi is available at 
stores across Canada and 
is now making its Nelson 
debut with a new studio 
and boutique. 

The Lilikoi studio is a 
working textile printing 



and clothing design studio 
where the public can see 
all aspects of clothing pro- 
duction and demonstra- 
tions of fibre techniques 
such as screen-printing 
and felting. 

Lilikoi production piec- 
es are made of sustain- 
able fibres such as bam- 
boo, organic cotton and 
linen. The cloth is hand 
printed in the studio from 
original drawings ensur- 
ing uniqueness. 

The Lilikoi Boutique 
will also feature the work 
of other independent 
Canadian designer/mak- 
ers. 



The EXPRESS newspaper is a proud supporter of Success by 6 



Wild Daisy takes root 

The Wild Daisy Cafe, a new little take-out business 
five minutes from Ainsworth on Highway 31, is opening 
on Friday, June 15. Easily accessible, this little roadside 
cafe is nestled in the mountains alongside Woodbury 
Creek and a historical mining site. 

The quaint cabin-style cafe offers outdoor seating so 
guests can enjoy the refreshing natural surroundings in 
relaxation. 

The Wild Daisy offers a fabulous menu full of hearty 
breakfasts, fresh delicious wraps and sandwiches, sweet 
bakery treats, flavourful ice cream, organic local coffee 
and cappuccino, scrumptious daily specials and much 
more. 

The Wild Daisy Cafe will be opened from 7 a.m. to 7 
p.m. seven days a week. 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 15 



Arts & Entertainment 



Great depth in shoaling water 



by Susan Andrews Grace 

The title poem of Tom 
Wayman's, High Speed 
through Shoaling Water, 
released by Harbour 
Publishing, begins: "Some 
hours, even days, I flew 
above that country/not 
confined by any device/ 
but with the air stream- 
ing over my arms." This 
is a book which rescues 
decency and a sense of 
rootedness. 

In High speed through 
shoaling waters, expect the 
intelligence, wit and eth- 
ics that mark Wayman's 
poems as well as tender- 
ness and wisdom. 

These lines from 
"Greenup" begin an intel- 
ligent and poignant poem: 




"When the switch trips, 
and I convert/to nothing/ 
a small swath will open in 
space-time." 

In "Ballad of the 
Pickups" deft irony makes 



a hard-hitting poem from 
the statistic that the 
favourite vehicle of multi- 
millionaires is the Ford F 
series pickup. 

In 20 lines, Wayman 
critiques the phenome- 
non's Christian roots and 
ends with this picture of 
bishops "escorting a flock 
of /Late-model pickups/ 
Through the eye of a nee- 
dle." 

Then there's the hilari- 
ous, wise and compas- 
sionate "Death of the 
Grandmothers" about the 
epidemic of grandmother 
deaths which occur in the 
fourteenth week of every 
sixteen week semester, 
when final assignments 
are overdue. 

These deaths escape 



news casts and even obitu- 
aries, "So as not to alarm/ 
the general population." 

Wayman is a writer of 
international stature but 
in these poems, which 
love the world, you will 
recognize the longing for 
summer in our little bit of 
Kootenay paradise: "We 
each count our summers/ 
in this Valley: our brief 
portion." 

Tom Wayman launched 
High speed through shoal- 
ing water and a collection 
of short fiction, Boundary 
Country (Thistledown 
Press/University of 

Eastern Washington 
Press) last month at 
Oxygen Art Centre, of 
which he was a founding 
member in 2001. 



Yam, Treasure Island 'twas a success 



A.I. Collinson Elementary 
School was swamped with charac- 
ters of the classic novel Treasure 
Island by Robert Louis Stevenson 
on Wednesday, May 30. 

The students, from kindergar- 
ten to Grade 6, put on a spectacu- 
lar year-end musical adaptation of 
the classic story. 

The musical and dialogue were 
written for middle school stu- 
dents but the young stars of A.I. 
Collinson clearly prove that they 
were up for the challenge. 

The set design and stage props 
were made by senior students of 
the school. 

The one-night performance 
played to a full house where the 
audience was treated to a dynamic 
children's choir, an energetic act- 
ing cast and an impressive set 
design. There was constant inter- 
action between the cast and choir, 
which was situated off the front of 
the stage. 

Students from Grades 3 to 6 
took on the acting roles while the 
kindergarteners and Grade 1 and 
two students were the adorable 




tribal Pigaloos. The school choir 
consists of students from as young 
as kindergarten to the senior class 
of Grade 6. 

"This is a production put on 
by students for students," said 
Tiffany Ward, A.I. Collinson's 
music teacher. She was the musi- 
cal director for the play. "The 
students have given up many of 
their recesses and lunch periods to 



practice very hard," said Ward. 

The students at A.I. Collinson 
have been rehearsing the play 
intensively for about two months. 
"They worked very hard ... the 
cast, the crew, the choir. It is due 
to their hard work that the play 
is such a success," added Kendra 
Laidlaw, a Grade 3/4 teacher, who 
was co-director for the produc- 
tion. 



Briefly 



Peers R Here 
Thursday, June 21, 6:30 
p.m. at the Capitol Theatre 

The City of Nelson, 
Nelson and District 
Youth Centre and the 
Columbia Basin Trust, 
presents Peers R Here. 

Over 20 local Nelson 
youth helped create 
this amazing film which 
explains the importance 
of youth leadership and 
peer support along with 
role-playing scenarios 
that affect youth today. 

The intention behind 
this film is to take it 
around the region with 
the commitment of 
inspiring young people to 
start their own successful 
Peers R Here program. 

Empower young 

people by putting them 
in positions of positive 
leadership and support 
and they will support a 
healthy future for us all. 



These young leaders 
prioritized their partici- 
pation and dedication 
to this program and film 
development. 

The film is a support- 
ing manual to help other 
communities build their 
own programs like the 
one in Nelson. 

The Peers R Here peer 
support program is based 
out of the Nelson and 
District Youth Centre, 
and currently has 21 
trained peer leaders who 
are able to support their 
peers and refer them to 
community services and 
opportunities available to 
them. 

Improv 2 Improv 
Sunday, June 17, 7:30 p.m. 
at The Moving Centre at 
533 Baker St. 

See a demonstra- 
tion of contact improv 
dance, open jam and live 
improv music and sound- 



scape performed by John 
Deeley on the stand-up 
bass and Nathan Bartley 
on didjeridoo. 

Participants and spec- 
tators are welcome to this 
by-donation event. 

Call 354-1024 for more 
information. 

Karen Guilbaults paintings 
at Corner House Cafe 
Friday, June 15 and 
throughout the summer at 
the Corner House Cafe at 
318 Anderson St. 

After her recent four- 
month trip to Mexico, 
artist Karen Guilbault 
has returned with paint- 
ings of Baja California 
and mainland Mexico. 

The paintings include 
surf and ocean scen- 
ery, cacti, and images of 
Mexican street vendors 
selling handicrafts. 

These colourful water- 
colour and oil paintings 
are for sale from $100 



and up, beginning June 15 
and continuing through 
the summer. 

Spring Painting Retreat 
Monday, June 18 to Friday, 
June 22 at Little Slocan 
Lodge 

David Alexander will 
once again be the guest 
mentor for Art and 
Adventure's spring paint- 
ing retreat. 

This getaway is 
designed for experienced 
artists who like to paint 
in the out-of-doors and 
would benefit from the 
presence of a mentor of 
international stature. 

Daytime trips to 
painting locations in the 
Valhallas are accessed by 
car or 4 x 4 vehicles. In 
late afternoons and eve- 
nings the group reviews 
the day's work. 

For more information 
contact Barbara Wilson 
at (250) 226-0021. 



The EXPRESS is 
Read Everywhere, 

even in Thailand! 




Justin Wilson, and friend Jeremy Van 
Troyen, of the Nelson Leafs took a trip 
to Thailand, bringing along a copy of the 
Express. Here is a picture of in front of the 
Tsunami Memorial Park on Koh Phi Phi 
Island in southern Thailand. Go Leafs Go! 

Going somewhere? 

Send us a photograph of you with your Express in a far 
away land. Whether it's Trail or Timbuktoo, your com- 
munity wants to know where you are and what you are 
doing. Send your 50 words and photo to: EXPRESS 
Community Newspaper, 554 Ward Street, Nelson, BC,VI L 
IS9, or email us at express@expressnews.bc.ca. 




Buy our jewellery or well 
open a big box store, 

48$ wm& A roster ^w$&a 




DS5COVCR THE SELKIRK ADVANTAGE 
f Mitk £* fl j® tan* Slrw-I Ndbsiti. 3C Ctfttdi 



Page 16 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 





PRICES EFFECTIVE THIS WEDNESDAY THRU SATURDAY ONLY ! 
^ifiW B^-HI^© l^rerfientsfor life SAFEWAY S 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



News 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 17 



lM 


Qu&lc 

■ , AROUND TOWN 




Sat. June 16 Son. June 17 








Wed. June 13 Tburs. June 14 Mow. June 18 










Fri. June 15 












Toes. June 19 






Tburs. June 14 












Sat. June 16 












Sun. June 17 









HELP WANTED for the EXPRESS NEWSPAPER 



One of these may be the job for you 



OFFICE MANAGER • FULL-TIME 

You are the front line and must be able to 
do everything, well almost everything in 
this calm but high energy environment. 

You will be involved in all aspects of 
the newspaper world. This job includes 
reception, sales and editorial support. 

Depending upon your own experience and 
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Do you have relevant experience? 



DISPLAY AD SALES • FULL-TIME 

You are the client's representative. You 
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Having a design sense as well as a sales 
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Do you have relevant experience? 



Please apply via e-mail to nbecker@uniserve.com. 
Thank you for your interest. Only short-listed applicants will be contacted. 



#1 -Sudoku 




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with Joseph-Mark Cohen 

www.treeoflifeschool.com 



The week leading up to the Summer Solstice is chock full of potent 
astro-weather. Thursday's New Moon at 24 degrees Gemini is trine 
Neptune. This is the month for big dreams to be incubated. A time for 
shifts, changes & re-arranges. On Friday Mercury turns retrograde at 12 
degrees of Cancer till July 1 1th. This period is filled with small snafus & 
potential miscommunications. The moon is in Leo for the 17th (Father's 
day) so we have a green light for warm-hearted family gatherings on 
Sunday. The Sun opposes Pluto on midnight of the 18th. A time to shine 
a laser into the personal & collective shadow! 



aries |\/| ars j n Aries is a Johnny Appleseed approach to gardening. 
O^ You need to work smart & get to the heart of the matter. Your 



wacko humour defuses critics & attracts allies. 



TAURUS 



tf 



Venus in Leo has you musing over love relations. Saturn there 
has you pondering the karma of relationships that are proving 
to be problematic. Be patient! 



GEMINI 



n 



Mercury turning retrograde is what we call: coyote medicine. 
Time to put a new spin on all that activity. Meditate, edit re- 
write, re-design, read between the lines... 



CANCER 



€p 



Deep within, you harbour a love-hate relationship to family 
gatherings. They evoke childhood memories. Your task this 
week: grieve deeply & praise what passes... 



LEO 

ft 



That Moon in Leo (17,18,19) is a time to gather your tribe to 
the great buffet table & the theatrical gig you have been cooking 
up for some months now. Let the cat out of the bag! 



VIRGO 



np 



You have accomplished a huge U-turn recently. This is nothing 
to be shy about. You are an avatar of dicing the ego into 
edibles. A master of tossing the salad... 



LIBRA 



n 



It is the fate of idealists & humanitarians to be often 
discouraged with the journey as they keep their dream eye on 
the destination. Take some down time. Re-creation! 



SCORPIO 



TO/ 



The Buddhists say that rage is the last thing one needs to 
release in order to gain enlightenment. You could consult a 
Virgo re chopping up unsavoury egos... 



SAGITTARIUS 



You are gazing into the omnivorous black hole at the heart 
of your galaxy. This may mean that some of your cosmos is 
becoming chaos. Lighten your heart... 



Capricorn Where | invest? Tokyo real estate? Chinese nuclear? Indian 
\/\ internet? Canadian diamonds? Try Capricorn futures... what 
V O your hands can accomplish! 



aaa j Face jt/ y° u are rest|ess & reaQ, y to 9 et on y° ur norse & ride - 

fVVV Just make sure you cover the bills, trust in Allah but tie up your 
rVW camels this week. . . 



PISCES 



X 



Your are caught in a big mutable T-square this week with the 
New Moon opposing Pluto. If you fail to manage the daytimer, 
explore the galactic Dream-time... 



Alchemysteries Elixirs & Aromatics • Crystal Dome Retreat Seminars 

Holistic/Kabbalistic Astrology Consults 

Journeys to Glastonbury, Crop Circles, Ireland 

CALL 1-888-633-2214 FOR ORDERS & INQUIRIES 



RIDE SHARING -the 

SOLUTION TO CLIMATE 
CHANGE 




ARE YOU COMMUTING IN AND 

OUT OF NELSON AND WOULD 

LIKE TO RIDESHARE? 

The West Kootenay EcoSociety is offering the 
people of Nelson and area an opportunity to 
make connections for ridesharing and to learn 
about local ridesharing resources. 

Wednesday, June 20 th , 
basement of the library, 7pm 



The People 
of Area E 









Selkirk Veterinary 
Hospital 



FORTISBC 



BChLfdro Q 



/Vf NelsonToyota 



Page 18 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Calendar 



Special Events 



Wednesday June 13 



Saturday June 16 



Body and 
Movement 

Ongoing/Drop-In Classes in 
Yoga, Dance & Martial Arts 



Ongoing Events 



Wednesdays 



Saturdays 



Friday June 15 



Wednesdays 



Saturday June 16 



Sunday June 17 



Sundays 



Monday June 1? 



Thursdays 



Tuesday June 19 



Fridays 



Saturdays 



Thursdays 



Mondays 




Thursday June 21 



Sundays 



Mondays 



Fridays 



Tuesdays 



- Piirlez-vous. 

frangais? 

We ran mate ii 

Y&UrJrj. 




. 



Saturday June 23 



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June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 19 



Classifieds 



*Kootenay Reader ads only. Not applicable for businesses or associations 

Free classifieds not taken by phone. Must be submitted in person, mail, e-mail or fax. 

Ads accepted for buying, selling, giving, renting, lost & found, etc. All ads must have a phone number. One ad per phone number per week 

First 15 words are FREE, each additional word 25C • Deadline: Thursday noon. 

Forward your ad to: 554 Ward St., Nelson, BC V1 L 1 S9 • Fax: 250-352-5075 • www.expressnews.ca 



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Deadline: Thursday noon! 



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ATTENTION EXPRESS READERS! 

To those of you who have submitted 
pictures for Pet of the Week, Babies, 
Read Everywhere etc, please pick up 
your pictures at the Express office, 554 
Ward St. at the front desk. Thank you! 

MOUNTAINEERING COURSE AUG 
25 TO AUG 29. $975 (CAD) with Tim 
Rippel. www.peakfreaks.com 250- 
352-9133. 

PERFECT GETAWAY! Angela's B&B & 
Guesthouse, Rossland. Private suites, 
creekside BBQ, nature paradise, fun. 
250-362-7790 www.visitred.com 

THE WILD DAISY CAFE, a new little 
take-out business five minutes from 
Ainsworth on Hwy 31, is opening by 
June 15th. Easily accessible, this little 
roadside cafe is nestled in the moun- 
tains alongside Woodbury Creek and 
a historical mining site. The quaint 
cabin-style cafe offers outdoor seat- 
ing so guests can enjoy the refresh- 
ing natural surroundings in relaxation. 
The Wild Daisy offers a fabulous 
menu full of hearty breakfasts, fresh 
delicious wraps and sandwiches, 
sweet bakery treats, flavourful ice 
cream, organic local coffee and cap- 
puccino, scrumptious daily specials 
and much more. Most importantly, the 
operators maintain their food is made 
with love and served with a smile! The 
Wild Daisy will be opened from 7am 
- 7pm, 7 days a week. Welcome all! 

HAZELDEAN GALLERY opens its 
door's to bring you locally crafted 
home fumishing's, art and gifts. 
Located in the Nelson Trading 
Company. 352-0660. 

RHYTHMIC DIMENSIONS 2007 
SUMMER CAMPS! Learn to dance 
with ribbons, hoops, balls, scarves 
and more! In these camps you will 
learn basic Creative Dance and 
Expression Skills, as well as Rhythmic 
Gymnastics. Crafts and other fun 
activities will also be included. Girls 
5-12 years old: July 9th - 12th, S. 
Slocan 226-0008 July 16-20 & Aug. 
20-24, Nelson 505-1812 July 23-27, 
Castlegar (250) 365-3386 Contact 
Rhythmic Dimensions for more info 
contact us at rhythmics@telus.net or 
505-1812 

DR. MICHAEL SMITH (TCM) is now 
accepting new patients. Offering 
services in Acupuncture, Traditional 
Chinese Medicine, Nutritional and 
Functional Medicine. 10 years expe- 
rience. Call 352-0459 

THE CHILDCARE RESOURCE AND 
REFERRAL PROGRAM has received 
on-going funding. We are open and 
providing services for both families 
and childcare providers. Come and 
check out our amazing toy library. 
Membership for the library is $25.00/ 
yr. Office hours are: Monday: 12:00 n 
4:00 Tuesday - Thursday: 9:00 - 4:00 
Friday: Closed We will be open one 
evening and one Saturday per month 
to be announced. For more informa- 
tion call: 352-0407 Drop in at 518 
Lake Street, Nelson 

ITEMS WANTED FOR KOOTENAY 
CO-OP RADIO'S Summer Yard Sale. 
To donate items, please call 505- 
5233 



RENAISSANCE HAIR COMPANY 
HAS NOW INCORPORATED a 
Day Spa. We are offering a vari- 
ety of beauty services including 
Dermalogica facials, massage, 
reflexology, manicures, pedicures, 
waxing and more, all to compliment 
your hair service and enjoy a day at 
the spa! 352-1955 

SIMPLY BEAUTIFUL....NATURALLY 
DEUCIOUS...THE ROSE GARDEN 
CAFE, Lakeside Park, is now open 
every day-11 to 6p.m. Breakfast 
wraps, Wild Salmon, Organic Burgers, 
Fish and Chips, Fresh Organic Salads, 
Frappes, Smoothies, Afternoon Tea... 
Offering the perfect setting for family 
and friends. 352-0059 

SILENT AUCTION AT WIN STORE! 
Silent Auction is on now until June 29. 
We have collectible coins and notes, 
vintage lamps, books and toys, art 
and other interesting items! Come 
check us out at 721A Front St. 



Art 



LOOKING FOR SUBMISSIONS OF ART 
to hang at my studio call 352-5575 

KOOTENAYARTISANS CHRISTMAS 
MARKET Call for Entry, deadline July 
27, 2007. Applications available on 
website www.ndac.ca or at 619 B 
Front Street. Info at 352-2402. Only 
juried faire in the Kootenays! 

NELL KUNST at the Royale! June 3rd: 
an eclectic xhibit of Horror, Humour, 
and Fun (Thanx Kiki! a SAMM 12 
DAT Prod.) 

POTTERY KILN, GAS OR PROPANE 
fired, aprox. 6 ft.x 6 ft. x 6 ft. refracory 
brick, steel framed. 352-9150 

PHOTO ARTIST JANET MclNTYRE 
showing at Max & Irma's (Kootenay St.). 
Don't miss it! FMI (250)399-0068 

Child Care 

CHILDCARE SPACE AVAILABLE 
beginning September in Longbeach 
area. 13 years experience. Loving 
home. Phone 229-4238. 

LNR REGISTERED CHILD Care pro- 
vider seeking full/part time work as of 
June. 352-7401 

Children 

HOPPEDIZ BABY WRAP for sale, 
cream with pink stripes, $75. Wanted: 
Ergo baby carrier. 359-5025. 

HIGH CHAIR $15, miscellaneous 
toys, booster seat 352-0532 

Computers 

LOOKING FOR VIDEO GAMES? 
Want to sell some? Check out www. 
theogre.ca, Online Gaming Rental & 
Exchange.ong 

17" CRT MONITOR (not LCD), $40; 
Saitek Cyborg/3D USB/Joystick, 
$10, Logitech Wingman/Action USB/ 
Gamepad $10, 365-3555 



Events 



12TH ANNUAL STRAWBERRY 
SOCIAL at Yasodhara Ashram. 
Complimentary strawberries! 
Saturday, June 23, 2-4pm. Call 1- 
800-661-8711. 



WIDENING THE RIVER OF YOGA 
- a one month course at Shanti Yoga 
Studio. Slow down and make direct 
contact with your non-separate being. 
Open your heart and breath,awaken 
your deep aliveness and connect 
with the healing power of gentleness 
and radical acceptance. Mon. morn- 
ings at 9:45 or Wed. evenings at 
7:15, starting June 18 & 20 at Shanti 
Yoga Studio. Tuition $100. For more 
info, contact Shayla at 352.7908, or 
barefootjourneys@netidea.com www. 
barefootiourneys.net 

KOOTENAY KIDS SOCIETY is host- 
ing a luncheon to honour two of our 
employees who are moving on to 
other ventures. Gwen Kalyniuk and 
Judith Fearing will be our guests of 
honour on Tuesday June 26th from 
12:00 to 1:00 pm at 312 Silica Street. 
Anyone who wishes to pay tribute 
to the outstanding work of these 
two women in the Life After Birth 
and Pregnancy Outreach Programs 
is welcome to drop by for a casual 
lunch during this time. 

INTRODUCTORY 
COMPASSIONATE 
COMMUNICATION workshop at 
Johnson's Landing Retreat Center. 
July 6, 4pm to July 8, 3pm. Join 
Melody and Eric in exploring 
the transformative process of 
Compassionate Communication 
amidst the stunning beauty of 
Johnson's Landing. In this workshop 
you will learn the Compassionate 
Communication process and practice 
it with the challenging situations in 
your life. For more details go to www. 
JohnsonsLandingRetreat.bc.ca or 
call toll free 1-(877)-366-4402 

PADDLE SERIES! Wednesdays 
6 p.m. Lakeside Park. Sponsored 
by Hellman & NKCC. Family fun. 
Reserve a boat: 825-9571. 

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER 
TRIBUTE with Amy Poznikoff (vocals) 
and Gilles Parenteau (keyboards), 
Sunday June 24th, Finley's, Shows: 
3pm and 7pm 

COME PLAY PAINT BALL WITH 
YOUR KIDS AT KOOTENAY 
KOMBAT! Parents free, weekdays 
after 4:00 p.m., with a kid. Book your 
parties and events for 2007 season. 
Battle for Bucks, June 16, novice tour- 
nament $2,000 (up to) prize. Kootenay 
Kombat, 4 Mile, 825-4074 

WIDENING THE RIVER OF YOGA- 
A one month course at Shanti Yoga 
Studio. Slow down and make direct 
contact with your non-separate being. 
Open your heart and breath,awaken 
your deep aliveness and connect 
with the healing power of gentleness 
and radical acceptance. Mon. morn- 
ings at 9:45 or Wed. evenings at 
7:15, starting June 18 & 20 at Shanti 
Yoga Studio. Tuition $100. For more 
info, contact Shayla at 352.7908, or 
barefootjourneys@netidea.com www. 
barefootjoumevs.net 

OPEN HOUSE SOCIAL, Slocan 
Legion Hall, Saturday June 23rd, 
beginning with Happy Hour at 5:00 
p.m. Beef Dip & Potato Salad $4.00. 
Card Games, Darts, Shuffleboard. 
EVERYONE WELCOME. Help sup- 
port your Legion! 




SUMMER SKATING LESSONS! 
Register June 13, 5-7pm at the 
Nelson and District Community 
Complex 

SUMMER SKATING LESSONS IN 
AUGUST! Register June 13, 5-7pm 
at Nelson and District Community 
Complex. 

ALLEGRO DANCE THEATRE 
*Summer Programs* July 9 - 20 
Ballet and Modern Dance for children 
7-12. Registration deadline June 20 
August 7-17 Ballet and Modern for 
Intermediate Students For more infor- 
mation please call Lynette Lightfoot 
359-7798 

STRAWBERRY TEA & CRAFT FAIR 
Sat. June 16, 2-4p.m. Delicious 
Strawberry shortcake! (diabetic 
& gluten free choices) Door Prize, 
Handmade Gifts, Treasure Table 
Draw admission $5, Anglican Church 
Hall (corner Carbonate & Ward) 



FREE 



USED RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT 

- all works. 6'commercial range, com- 
mercial dishwasher, ice machine. 
Redfish Grill Nelson, BC call 551- 
3456. 

THE FREE STORE at the Nelson 
Womenis Centre is FULL of kids and 
womens clothes and more. Open 
Tues/Wed 12-4. 420 Mill Street. 

GOT MICE? Very friendly, affection- 
ate, clean, house-trained 7 year old 
male neutered cat needs a home. 
354-4485 

FRIDGE, Medium size, works. You 
pick up. 505-5201 

CARPET WITH FOAM BACKING 
and underlay, both waffle and foam. 
352-6762 

FRIDGE in good working order, 399- 
4207 

FULL SIZE CHEST FREEZER 
in good working order. You move. 
Nelson. Call Tracey 354-4078 

FREE: about 800 small glass jars for 
craft ideas/yoghurt. Clean. You pick 
up. 354-1150 

FRIDGE, STOVE, Bl DISHWASHER 

- free -in working order - needs clean- 
ing - you pick up call 352-3559 

Furniture 

BEER FRIDGE, MASSAGE LOUNGE 
CHAIR, coffee tables, love seat, 
lamps, pictures, cushions, oil furnace 
and tank. 505-2060 

LIVE LOCAL WHEN FURNISHING 
YOUR HOME. Hazeldean Gallery 
sells locally crafted furniture. Each 
piece is unique! Located in the Nelson 
Trading Company. 352-0660. 

ANTIQUE L-SHAPED COUCH with 
built in lazy susan and end tables. 
Needs some restoration. Asking $100 
OBO. Please phone 825-0165. 

BRAUHAUS SOFA/love seat, Berber 
carpet, book cases, computer desk/ 
monitor, cables, spiritual/health 
books, plants 359-5000 

ANTIQUE SOLID OAK PEDESTAL 
dining room table with 6 chairs (1 
captain) $1,000/offers 352-2252 



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WANTED: FURNITURE NEEDED for 
single mum family. Beds, Dressers, 
couch, table, chairs. 505-3365 Nelson 
Thanks! 

ANTIQUE SOFA AND TWO CHAIRS 
Re-covered Great Condition Phone 
505-2174 $2,500 OBO 

LIVING ROOM FURNITURE, upscale, 
like new sofa, tub chairs, sofa table, 
coffee table, nesting tables, 2 gold- 
framed pictures. 354-1467 

NEW HOUSE NEED ALMOST 
EVERYTHING. ..BEDS, dressers, 
tables, couch, lights, etc. Must be in 
good shape. 353-9631. 

CHILD'S IKEA BED FOR sale. $150 
or best offer call 505-2154 

ANTIQUE UNIQUE SOLID DARK 
OAK BAR/BOOKCASE. Visit www. 
charlwood.com/antique for photos 
and details. 352-3712 

Garage Sales 

GARAGE SALE 16 JUNE 510 West 
Richards St 8am kids & household stuff 

BEASLEY FIREHALL ANNUAL 
GARAGE SALE July 7, 2007. 
Donations accepted after July 2, 
2007. COME JOIN US. 

Health & Fitness 

ESSENCE HEALING SPA offers in 
home spa treatments. Manicures, 
pedicures, massage, waxing and 
more. Call Kristin 505-5384 

MOM & BABY FITNESS CLASSES 
- get fit with your baby. Full body 
cardiovascular and strength work- 
outs with special attention given 
to postpartum postural issues and 
abdominal strength. Call 825-4042 
and speak with Samantha for more 
information. 

Help Wanted 

CHILDCARE PROVIDERS NEEDED 
YOUR HOME Nelson / North Shore 
/ Balfour CHILDCARE RESOURCE 
AND REFERRAL A program of 
Kootenay Kids. We provide support, 
resources, toys and start-up assis- 
tance Inquiries for registration require- 
ments 518 Lake St. 352-0407 

ROOM, UTILITIES AND ORGANIC 
GARDEN PRODUCE in exchange for 
gardening help. Possibility for other 
cash income. Now to November.229- 
4346 

PANORAMA IS NOW HIRING 
EXPERIENCED PLANTERS for May 
and June, and accepting applications 
for firefighting 229-4709. 

ARE YOU ABLE to convert cassette 
tapes to CDs? I need help with this. 
352-2139 



Help Wanted 

CARE TAKING POSITION 
AVAILABLE in exchange for accom- 
modation. Remote location n vehicle 
needed. References required. Please 
reply with letter to Box 922 c/o The 
Express, Nelson, BCV1L6A5. 

LOOKING FOR A LIVE-IN caregiver 
starting July 1st, for a very person- 
able young man with Duchenne's 
Muscular Dystrophy who uses a 
motorized wheelchair and requires 
regular assistance for physical 
needs. Caregiver to live in client's 2 
bedroom home and provide support 
evening and overnight. For info call 
Lisa Baker at Community Living BC 
(250)304-4207. 

THE ROSE GARDEN CAFE is 
now accepting resumes for sum- 
mer employment. Food Safe 
required. Starting Grade 11/12. Drop 
off resumes to Rod or Kaspar at 
Lakeside Park. 352-0059 

MARKETING AND SALES PERSON 
required by The International 
Selkirk Loop Tourism Society. The 
responsibilities of this full-time posi- 
tion include: Member relations and 
recruitment, Advertising sales, Public 
presentations, Government relations, 
and Funding proposals. Sales/mar- 
keting experience, presentation skills 
and proficiency with computers/office 
software necessary. This is a unique 
and varied job opportunity. If you are 
interested, please email your resume 
to: The International Selkirk Loop, 
canada@selkirkloop.org 

EXPERIENCED TIMBER FRAMER 
WANTED; installation experience 
an asset. Good wages and benefits 
for the right person. Contact SWIZ 
Timber Frame Homes at 229-5712. 

JANITORS WANTED IMMEDIATELY 
IN NELSON. MUST be bondable. 
Respond to: BEECLEAN Building 
Maintenance #8-2550 Acland Rd. 
Kelowna, B.C. V1X 7L4 Office: 250- 
491-4454 Fax: 250-491-4154 Toll 
Free: 1-800-641-3344 

DEBRIS REMOVAL Vallican $$$$ 
2wks perry@shaw.ca 

HOUSEKEEPERS NEEDED at 

Kokanee Chalets in beautiful 
Crawford Bay. Accommodation avail- 
able. 1-800-448-9292. 

PART-TIME RELIEF MANAGER FOR 
49 unit apartment building in Nelson, 
BC. Receive rental discount AND hour- 
ly wages for part-time work. Successful 
candidate will live on-site, handle vacu- 
uming, cleaning and in winter, snow 
shoveling. No previous management 
experience required. References 
must be excellent. Email resumes to 
info@alpinelakesuites.com. 



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Thank you for doing your part to minimize the 
needless destruction of garbage conditioned bears. 
Spread the word — ask your neighbours and friends 
to bear-proof their properties too. 
www.grctBEARsmart.com or call: 250-359-6611 



Page 20 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Classifieds 



Help Wanted 

COOKS WANTED FOR CEDAR 
CREEK CAFE in Winlaw - please 
apply in person or call 355-2838. 

COTTONWOOD MARKET 
MANAGER: P/T includes Saturday 
Market, set up/take down, Vendor 
liaison. Requires good physical con- 
dition, organizational skills, oral and 
written communication skills. Need 
vehicle or bike trailer. Apply with 
resume & references to info@eco. 
kics.bc.ca 

Home & Garden 

COW MANURE, $65. per P/U load. 
Mulch hay $3./bale. You pick-up or 
can deliver. Call 226-7276 

ORGANIC GARDEN PRODUCE, in 
exchange for gardening help. Now 
to November. Located on Longbeach 
Road, 15 km north east of Nelson. 
For more info, call Bren, between 
8:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. 229-4346 

JUNK TO THE DUMP + WEED 
WHACKING. Call me now. 352-3871. 
I'LL DO IT! 

THINKING IT'S TIME TO CLONE 
YOURSELF? Buried in house work? 
Maybe you could use a SECRET 
WIFE! Specializing in: Organization 
Strategies, Space Beautifying and Mess 
Consolidation. The Secret Wife Society 
can help you! 354-4671. PS. We are a 
professional cleaning company. 

PARADISE TOPSOIL, Landscapers 
and Horticulturist Choice. Pick up or 
Delivery 355-2489 

PERENNIALS ROCK - tired of plants 
that need constant water, and need 
replacing every spring? Primarily 
Perennials Ltd. has a solution: 5 
Rights: owners needs, plant, mois- 
ture, soil, & sun. Member of COPF. 
Drop in or ask for Kris for no charge 
custom service, including custom divi- 
sions from "mommy plants" 352-9858 
weekdays or 352-3317 weekends. 
1549/1557 Granite Rd., parking at 
the accounting office at the top of the 
private road. We also have (tested on 
our farm) deer resistant plants! 

PERENNIALS AT GRANITE ROAD 
unusual and rare plants call and ask 
for Kris for no charge custom service 
352-9858 weekdays or 352-3317 
weekends. 1549/1557 Granite Rd., 
parking at the accounting office at 
the top of the private road, call ahead 
with your list, fax 354-1625 or email 
pplbc@telus.net 

DIRTY JOBS AND SOMEONE'S 
GOTTA DO 'EM Cleaning, garden- 
ing & "like a Trojan". -Yardening to 
Farmscapes- Single jobs or regular 
maintenance. Efficient, bondable. 
Excellent references. Inside and out 
of boats, too! 354-4720 

QUALITY ROOFING, SMALL LOCAL 
COMPANY with good references; call 
James @ 505-9072 

LAWN AND GARDEN 
MAINTENANCE, construction land- 
scaping, decking. Call Corinna @ 
551-1337 refs. available 

Iris: URGENT while you can see 
them in bloom. Most are scented! 
Great selections: Drop in or ask for 
Kris for no charge custom service 
352-9858 weekdays or 352-3317 
weekends. 1549/1557 Granite Rd., 
parking at the accounting office at the 
top of the private road. 

House Sitting 

EXPERIENCED RELIABLE PROF. 
FEMALE is available to housesit. Pets 
ok. Excellent refs. 250-308-4084, 
email: marlabc2003@yahoo.ca 

Lost & Found 

FOUND: PIN WITH elephants, in 
uphill. 352-2705 

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COLES 



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Lost & Found 

LOST: LVR Jacket with Silva on the 
back. Tara 505-5332 

FOUND: AT TAGHUM BEACH: 
Alternating beaded necklace with sil- 
ver pendant. Call 354-1902 

LOST: IN ROSEMONT. Young female 
Siamese Tabby cat. Pale blue eyes. 
352-2856. 

Misc. for Sale 

USED COMMERCIAL WALK in freez- 
er/fridge 8x10 1 0foot ceiling insulated 
metal walls $4000. 359-7261 evening 
359-8002 

Gel Seat for Bike, one zone, $15. 
354-1675 

KENMORE WASHER AND DRYER 
FOR SALE $350 OBO 505-2118 

BRENDA DYGRAF Instride walker 
machine $15; rowing machine $15 
352-6762 

PANAFAX PX150 FAX phone 
machine like new in original box ask- 
ing $75. 354-1675 

NAISH KiteBoard and AirRush Kite, 
Harness, Lines, bag included $300. 
Oneil 5mm wetsuit(sweet) $150 
info@spoonbender.ca 

HOTPOINT FRIDGE, range, xm satil- 
ite radio each $50 obo 359-7425 

OVER 100 BABYSITTER CLUB Books 
in mint condition $25. 359-7163 

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1 


2 


6 


1 


4 


2 


8 


6 


9 


5 


7 


3 


7 


3 


6 


5 


1 


2 


9 


4 


8 



see puzzle on page 17 see puzzle on page 17 



Misc. for Sale 

LOGITECH WIRELESS COMPUTER 
Keyboard/Mouse set. Wheel mouse, 
both have many extra functions 
mouse comes with rechargeable bat- 
teries new $45. obo 505-5058 

LOGGING TRUCK LOAD of dry fire- 
wood $800, medium size deep freeze 
$125. (250) 399-4378 

KODAK CAROUSEL SLIDE 
PROJECTOR and screen. Screen like 
new. Two carousels. Offers? 229-407 

FOR SALE 14' SUNDANCE 
TRAMPOLINE $100 OBO. 359-7937 

BIRKENSTOCK SANDALS - 2 pair. 
Unisex-size 41 & 42 (about a 9-1/2 

- 10-1/2) New cost $125 asking $75 
each. 354-1944 

KENMORE CLOTHES DRYER, 
heavy duty, large capacity, works well. 
Good condition $200 obo 505-5201 

UPRIGHT FREEZER, like new, for 
sale. Magnavox stereo/radio to give 
away. Excellent condition. 352-7429 

3 ROLLS OF 7/8" Cable - offers. 
10,000 lb hydraulic winch $750. New 
electric roaster $50. 226-7990 

GRAD DRESS for sale, size 12 $50 
825-9985 

LOVE SEAT $50, queen size bed 
$160, dresser drawers $25, diamond 
engagement/wedding rings $200. 
265-0216 

LARGE SPORT RACK, offers, Acer 
travel mate 4000 laptop, $500 obo, 
wood stove, offers, pasta maker, 
offers 352-0335 

HOME THEATRE SYSTEM WITH TV, 
custom solid oak cabinet, new $6,000, 
asking $3,000 obo, 352-2823 

16' FIBREGLASS CANOE, like new 
condition, air compressor Campbell 
Hausfeld 26 GAL tank, 5 hp motor 
$165 229-9922,352-6221 

DELTA 10" HYBRID TABLE Saw 30" 
Fence 1 3/4 hp Motor $800 obo 
505-5289 

SLIDE PROJECTOR WITH SCREEN 

- offers? Large office desk with key- 
board drawer $40 Older scanner. 
352-0532 



Misc. for Sale 

2 - 5' SCREENED SLIDING GLASS 
doors, $100 each; KBC mtorcycle 
helmet, open face, small, $40. 352- 
5211 

POOL TABLE 8FT + balls $75, memo- 
rex scanner $20. 365- 5608 

TEUTONIA BABY STROLLER. 
Practically New! Bought in the UK for 
$750. Asking $300 obo 359-5926 

TOTAL GYM $90, kids bike $40, 
pedicure foot bubbler $25, mosquito 
trap $1 50, new Canon Color cartridge 
$20, 226-7356 

LONELY PLANET INDIA 10TH 
EDITION 2003 $35 Bali & Lombok 
10th Edition 2005 $25 Brand New 
354-1752 

CHILDREN'S BIKE FOR SALE. 
Purple, good condition, 16" tires, 
metal training wheels. $40 505-3365 
Nelson 

LIGHTWEIGHT PORTABLE 

MASSAGE TABLE; 6 months old, 
like new condition, c/w carrying case. 
$250 call Derek® 509-1239 
100 USED WOODEN SPINDLES 
$75, twin bed with headboard $70, 
keyboard amplifier $100, fridge $25 

'HIDDEN HITCH' FOR MAZDA MPV, 
never used $175 phone 359-6606 

FTA SATELLITE RECEIVERS FOR 
SALE $200. Leave message 354- 
8270 

BLUE PRINT MACHINE, Diazo 
PD101 fits upto 24x36 paper w/paper 
$200 obo. 354-1660 

COMPLETE SET OF MECHANIC'S 
TOOLS and toolbox, and many other 
things. Sacrifice sale. 250-226-7729 

12FT. INFLATABLE SWIMMING 
POOL, with pump $75. and queen 
size bed. $80. Julie 352 7817. 

ANTIQUE METAL BATHTUB, white, 
small detail on side, copper drains, 
very cute, $100 obo. 825-9938 

PARAGLIDER - SWISS MADE WITH 
harness. Pilot weight range 65 - 85 
kg. $1,000. 352-0463 




A Directory of Health & Healing 

IN THE KOOTENAYS 



Acupuncture 

Academy of Classical Oriental Sciences 

Student Clinic 354-1 984 

Jen Cherewaty, RAC, Balance for Body & Soul354-1 752 
Sara Fujibayashi RAC 7 at Mountain Waters Spa352-3280 
Claudia Kavcic, RAC, at Mountain Waters Spa352-3280 

Shauna Robertson, Reg. Acupuncturist 352-2167 

Marion Starr, Dr.TCM 352-9890 

Art Therapy 

Clearwater Art Therapy 505-1 100 

Astrology 

Astrology & Aromatherapy, Joseph-Mark 229-2227 

Sharon O'Shea, Astrological Readings 352-2455 

Breathwork 

Blanche Tanner, BP, Family Constellation 227-6877 

Coaching 

Pauline Daniel, Life & Transition Coaching ... 354-9654 

Richard Klein, Stress Reduction Coach 352-3280 

Shayla Wright, Personal Coach & Mentor 352-7908 

Colonics 

Hydrotherapy, Living Foods, Coaching 352-6419 

Counselling & Consultation 

Brain Gym, Learning, Ion-cleanse, Gayle, M. Ed.226-7655 
Miriam M. Martineau, MA, Integral Counselling5Q5£170 
Dienna Raye, MA, Counsellor & Life Coach... 352-1 220 

Hair Care 

Front St. Hair Studio, The Key to Beauty 354-1 202 

Herbalist 

Janice Poloway, Certified Iridologist, Herbalist55M528 

Homeopathy 

Barbara Gosney, CCH, RS, Horn BC 354-1 180 

Hypnotherapy 

Sharon Best, Certified Adv. Hypnotherapist ...354-7750 

Massage Services 

A TOUCH OF ALOHA, Lomi, Cranio, StructX Sports2294424 

Juliena Brown, Certified Practitioner, RAC 551 -BODY 

Jennifer Johnston RMT 551-11 97 

POWER ESSENTIALS, True Aromatherapy&Massage5Q54144 

Ginger Joy Rivest, Neuro Somatic Therapy 505-4284 

RUB IT IN, Mobile & Studio, Deep Tissue, Neuro352-6804 

Pharmacy 

Remedy's RX Custom Compound 737 Baker St.352-6928 

Sex Therapy 

Dr. David Hersh, Board Certified 352-0151 

Social Work 

Val Amies, BSW, RSW, Counselor 505-8044 

Spas 

Mountain Waters Spa, 205 Victoria St 352-3280 

Shalimar Spa, located at the Prestige Inn 354-4408 



TO LIST YOUR SERVICE, CALL 354-3910 




Natural, organic foods & products 

since 1 975 



Open 8:00 - 7:00 Mon. to Sat. 

295 Baker Street, Nelson • 354-4077 
www. kootenay. coop 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 21 



Classifieds 



Misc. for Sale 

SAND, FINE , CLEAN, masonry qual- 
ity or beach sand, $25 pick-up or $20 
yard, 6-Mile, 825-0022 

SINGLE BED/FRAME Wood head- 
board (as new) $200, New pine 
crokinole/checkers game $50, Men's 
Wilson golf clubs $50, started golf 
set $25. 2 sofas with metal frames, 
Swedish maded $150, 2 Golf cad- 
dies. 352-9995 

SEARS HEAVY DUTY WASHER/ 
DRYER team. Galvanized furnace 
pipes. Call for info 354-1192 

MASTERCRAFT MAXIMUM 
ROUTER, 18 pc router bit kit, spin 
saw kit, all never used, 2 yrs old $200 
355-2755 

MATERNITY JEANS, Old Navy brand 
new w/tags, size 16/18, tummy panel, 
adjustable waist $25 354-0115 

APARTMENT SZ. RANGE. Brand 
new, white, fridgidaire. Price $475 
Helena 229-4617 

BIRKENSTOCK SANDALS-BRAND 
NEW! SIZES 9-1/2 to 10-1/2 mens. 
Have 2 pair-new retail $125 asking 
$75 each. 354-1944 

MOVING SALE Black leather recliner, 
36' Extension ladder, antique wing- 
back chair, elliptical exerciser, drill 
press, 6' chaise lounge, Sony hi-fi 
components, 19" older TV, 16" chain- 
saw, antique blanket box, Bentwood 
coat stand. 352-1235 

WASHER - $100; 4-year old DRYER 
-$175. Excellent condition. Call 354-1545 

5000 BTU AIR CONDITIONER $50, 
twin electric bed $50, Beatty bath 
bench $35, 4 wooden chairs $60 
359-7756 

Misc. Wanted 

CHILD BIKE TRAILER in good shape 
229-4767 

ROOF-RACKS FOR TOYOTA 
4Runner, dependable used ride'em 
lawn mower, & gently used posture- 
pedic twin mattress. 229-4500 



Misc. Wanted Music & Dance Pets & Livestock 



Retreats 



I'M LOOKING FOR A ROOF rack for 
my 1992 Toyota 4Runner. Call Juliet 
352-2251. 

LOOKING FOR A RETAIL OR 
COMMERCIAL greenhouse. 359-5926 

BIGBY PLACE, A DAY PROGRAM for 
adults with disabilities needs a com- 
poster. Hopefully Free. 352-0867 

TALL WOODEN BOOKSHELVES, 
white computer deask, antique or 
old big dinner table (extendable pre- 
ferred), antique oak chairs, 352-3033 

WANTED: METAL FARM GATE, 8 
to 12 feet long. Inexpensive or free. 
Thank You. 352-5617 

Metal weight set and bench. 352-5211 

LOOKING FOR A YURT, TEPEE, 
SMALL CABIN for guest accommoda- 
tion. Will dismantle. Call 352-1376 



WANTED A CANOPY for Ford 
"Ranger" short box. Reasonably 
priced-Call Eric @ 355-2491 

TENT TRAILER. Nothing fancy just 
clean and dry. 357-2168 or 505-3177 

WASHER AND DRYER NEEDED for 
single mum and kids. Please call 505- 
3365 in Nelson. Thanks! 

USED PORTABLE MASSAGE 
TABLE, good quality and condition, 
fair price 352-0197 

OUTDATED PHOTOGRAPHIC 
PAPER, old 35mm cameras. Fred 
352-2129 

Music & Dance 

FRIENDS OF CLASSICAL MUSIC 
informal, interactive gatherings/ 
events for music aficionados. Contact 
JoAnne @ 352-3998. 

VICTORIA STREET STRINGS All 
level string players welcome. Info 
505-5583 

ROLAND VS840EX DIGITAL 8-track 
recorder. In great shape, comes with 
7 250mb Zip disks - $450. 505-2684 



ARMSTRONG FLUTE $275, 1/2 size 
violin $95, Bonmusica shoulder-rest 
$30. Call 352-1925 

ARMSTRONG FLUTE $275, 1/2 size 
violin $95, Bonmusica shoulder-rest 
$30. Call 352-1925 

SONY 120W 3-WAY STEREO speak- 
ers, black, hardly used, excellent con- 
dition, $100 firm, 365-3548 

MANDY AT THE OUTER CLOVE 
RESTAURANT. Come and Dine 
while listening to some unforgettable 
music. 

Personals 

COMPANY COMING? 2 for 1 cou- 
pons for many local area eats, treats 
and games at Darwins & Annie's 

Pets & Livestock 

HOMES4ANIMALS.COM: Looking 
for a new or lost pet? Visit this up-to- 
date free Web site or call 352-7178 
or 352-2228. 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES! Are 
you interested in walking dogs, play- 
ing with cats or being a temporary 
foster parent? Please give the Nelson 
SPCAa call! 352-7178. 

NEED A FRIEND? Got a cat. Clean, 
affectionate, male neutered cat to 
give away. Likes mice. 354-4485 

PUPPIES: Lab/Retriever/Collie X. 
Good natured, willing, loyal. Ideal 
pet for family & farm. $80. + TLC. 
355-2975 

FISH TANK AND FILTER AND LIGHT, 
30 gallons $150 OBO 352-7120 

WANTED: WILD TURKEYS and or 
fertile wild turkey eggs. 352-5616 

LIVESTOCK GUARDIAN DOG, 
puppy. Raised and bonded to sheep. 
355-2269 

MILKING-GOAT, purebred Alpine 
(no papers), freshened in February, 
$150,352-1695. 



JACKRUSSELLTERRIERPUPPIES. 
For sale 3 females 2 males. Contact 
Renee 551-1881 

30 GALLON FISHTANK with filter 
and light $100 O.B.O. 352-7120 

Prof Services 

CD & DVD Duplication, direct to disc 
printing and graphic design located in 
Nelson: www.shortyburns.com 352- 
BURN (2876) 

NELSON'S SAME DAY COURIER 
for small moves, recycle/junk runs, or 
deliveries by Hybrid car or full sized 
van! 551-2727 

EVENT PHOTOGRAPHY, profession- 
al high quality on-site printing. Sporting 
events, live performances, festivals, 
etc. Candid shots for every occasion. 
A MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY 551-2276 
or amillerphotography@mac.com 

MONUMENTAL STONE WORKS 

Custom headstones/monuments 
Portable sandblasting Cleaning and re- 
highlighting Glass etching. 354-0988 

Retreats 

BAREFOOT JOURNEYS OFFERS 
THE GIFT OF Presence' evening 
retreat. Opening to the deep ease, 
freedom and wholeness of your 
true nature. No previous experience 
in meditation required. June 28 7- 
9:30pm@ Shayla's Home Studio. 
$20. For more info or to register, 
call Shayla Wright 352-7908, www. 
barefootjoumeys.net 

Barefoot Joumeys-THE HEART OF 
COMMUNICATION' RETREAT FOR 
COUPLES. June 22-24. An oppor- 
tunity to meet with your partner in 
the heart, beyond the conditions and 
limitations of the personality. OM 
YOGA STUDIO, north Nelson. Fri. 
7-9pm-free introductory evening, Sat. 
1-6pm, Sun. 10-6pm. $170, bring 
your partner for free. Call 352.7908 to 
talk with Shayla or to register, www. 
barefootjoumevs.net 



BAREFOOT JOURNEYS OFFERS 
3 Gift of Presence Evening Retreats, 
June 28, July 5 & July 12. 7-9:30pm 
at Shayla's Home Studio, Nelson. 
Learn how to open to your basic 
sanity and goodness. Drop from the 
mind into the living wisdom of your 
heart. Each session consists of a talk 
by Shayla, dialogue and interaction, 
and experiential exercises. Tuition 
$20 per retreat. Come to one of all. 
For more info or to register contact 
Shayla 352.7908, 

THE ALCHEMY OF WRITING' 
half day retreat, June 30, 2-6pm 
at Shayla's Home Studio. Listening 
from the heart, releasing doubts 
and judgments, we open to the flow 
of our authentic and spontaneous 
expression. Learn how to support 
and encourage your natural creativ- 
ity. Tuition $40. For more info or to 
register, contact Shayla 352.7908, 
barefootjourneys@netidea.com www. 
barefootjoumevs.net 

Sports 
Equipment 

BIKES HAVE ARRIVED! Affordable 
parts, repairs, backpacks, hik- 
ing boots, climbing gear, tents. 
BOOMTOWN SPORTS, 505-5055 

TENNIS ANYONE? New to Nelson, 
looking for partners. Intermediate to 
advanced. Call Steve at 354-1271 

BASKETBALL HOOP SYSTEM. 
Huffy Sports, easy height adjustment, 
breakaway rim, heavy duty $125 229- 
2329 

"RIGOT" KAYAK DOUBLE SEAT, 
including 2 wooden paddles, 2 life 
jackets. $450. phone: 551-5652 

FULL FACE BIKE HELMET used 
very little phone 359-7706 

BOOMTOWN SPORTS Nelson's 
largest bike shop is liquidating hiking 
boots, backpacks, bags, tents 505- 
5055 boomtownskis.com 



Sports 
Equipment 

05 SPECIALIZED HARD ROCK 
COMP, great shape. Frame size 16, 
Marzocchi comp 5", travel shock, 
mechainical disk brakes $600 OBO 
357-2536 

'EASY SHAPER PRO' $50 359-6606 

CROSMAN BACKPACKER 2289G 
rifle, LED Sight, special rales and 
cleaning kit. Paid $350+, asking $200 
OBO 357-2729 

2006 KONA STINKY DELUXE, large, 
sweet Bike! call for the details $2,200 
352-2361 

Work Wanted 

BC CERTIFIED FALLER available 
for small jobs on acreages, etc. 
Reasonable rates. Call Shaun at 
354-7411 

EXPERIENCED MATURE RELIABLE 
WOMAN.. to houseclean, references 
if required. Call Gail @ 352-4630 

CAN YOU DIG IT?... WE CAN! Two 
women crew ready to get our hands 
dirty. Gardening, yard work, and odd 
jobs, serving nelson and area. Call 
Lauren: 354-3984 or Eryn: 505-5351 
anytime! 

LEVEL 3 OCCUPATIONAL FIRST 
AID ATTENDANT looking for hire. 
Self motivated, reliable, friendly. Call 
Josh 505-9970 

WEED WHACKING AND yard clean 
up 505-0744 

TAKING HOLIDAYS? will care for 
your house, pets, garden and pots. 
great references. 352-3609. 

JT DESIGNS- Architectural Design 
and Drafting Services- Additions/ 
Renovations or New Construction- 
Contact Joel @ 505-5522 

NEED HELP WITH 

HOUSECLEANING, gardening, or 
other chores? Call Ann for reliable, 
efficient service @ 352-9589 



TOYS & WHEELS 



Automotive-Cars Automotive-Cars Sleds/Bikes Trucks/SUVs/Vans Trucks/SUVs/Vans 



Boats 



1984 VOLVO WAGON, runs fine, 
high kms, $500 229-4767 

2003 PONTIAC GRAND AM: 
Loaded, 4 door, grey, auto, 81,000 
kms, $10,900. Rob 365-5654 or 304- 
9085 

WANTED: CARS OR TRUCKS that 
run $50-$150 551-0070, will pick up. 
551-0070 

1998 RED MUSTANG 5spd, air, p/ 
w/s, new tires, great gas mileage, no 
rust, $8,000 352-7228/359-8088 

1988 BUICK PAR AVE, CALIFORNIA 
IMPORT, Rust-free, excellent con- 
dition, 30 plus MPG, $3,850 OBO 
359-7043 

2000 PONTIAC GRANDAM GT, 4 dr, 
fwd, fully loaded, new tires, brakes. 
Excellent condition $6,950 352-0342 

1995 AWD SUBARU LEGACY. 5 spd. 
219,000 km. 2 sets rims and tires. 
$7,500 obo. 825-2216. 

1990 TOYOTA CELICA: GT Sport- 
pack, 112,000km, excellent perfor- 
mance, great looks, +winters on rims, 
$5,000. 354-4629 

1972 VW BUG, $400 obo, Body too 
rusty - selling for parts, engine rebuilt, 
new tires. 352-5294 

1998 RED MUSTANG, 5spd, air/t/ 
cr, power/w/d/l/s, new high perfor- 
mance tires, priced to sell $8,000 
352-7228/359-8088 



1992 VW PASSAT AWD WAGON 
5speed, gasoline, leather, loaded, 
excellent condition, 1 89,000kms Must 
See!$5900. 352-0536 

1967 VOLVO 122S, runs, only for 
parts or restoration $500. 4 tires, with 
rims (Tercel) $150 226-7868 

SUBARU LOYALE WAGON - 180,000 
km! 4 Wheel Optional, New Clutch, 
Brakes, Great tires. Call Heather 354- 
0509 $2,800 

1985 VOLVO STATION WAGON, 
TURBO, 5 SPEED w/OD, 4 good win- 
ter tires w/rims, Power windows/locks, 
Body excellent, Runs well, $2,500 
227-8993 or 354-3431 (try both) 

1988 FORD TEMPO, new parts, 
snows on rims, $900 OBO 352-3262 
or 229-5315 

Sleds/Bikes 

2003 YAMAHA V-STAR, 650CC shaft 
drive, purple/chrome, 850 km., all acces- 
sories, $7,500, 354-4697, 505-9452 

1977 YAMAHA 400CC. Low mileage, 
fair condition. Reduced: $900. o.b.o. 
352-9275 

2004 POLARIS 800/159", 1,500 
miles, mint condition $7,000 (or trade 
for boat or motorcycle) futon, stove, 
353-2835 

1983 KAWASAKI 440 road bike 
phone 359-7706 



YAMAHA VINO, bought new, driven 
3 months. Exc cond. New Helmet 
included, awesome mileage. $2,000. 
250-226-7841 

Tires/Parts/Other 

205/40/17" TIRES ON rims fits Ford/ 
Honda 4bolt cars $1,400 obo 250- 
231-1005 

CANOPY 8 FT, OLDER, good condi- 
tion, red $300, firm. 352-9177 

ALL SEASON 195/75 R14 tires. 7 
on rims $160. 4 without rims $60 
359-7942 

Trucks/SUVs/Vans 

2002 TOYOTA TACOMA: "TRD off- 
road", 4x4, 4D quad-cab, V6 auto, 
canopy, AM/FM/CD, extended war- 
ranty, accident free, 107,400 km, 
$27,500 obo 229-2226 

1990 JEEP YJ, 5 speed manual, 
hard, soft, bikini top and CD player 
$3,255 OBO 229-5418 

2003 CARAVAN, 75,000 km. $10,000 
o.b.o. Leaving the country; at North 
Shore Inn. 354-4022. 

1995 JEEP GRAND Cherokee 4 by 4 
Auto, recent work done, $3,700, call 
Christine 354-1944 

1991 TOYOTA EXTRA-CAB 4X4, 
3"lift, 33"tires, canopy, boat-rack, 
custom bush-bumper, skid-plate, low 
rust, $5,000, 352-6625. 



2000 PONTIAC MONTANA, SEAT'S 
7. Power window's, lock's, Keyless 
entry, great shape. $9,500. o.b.o. 
509-1069 

1993 F250 XLT 4x4 ext cab 1 ton 
suspension pkg canopy 7.3I V8 diesel 
$2,250 352-1303 

1976 CHEV FLATDECK, flat black, 
new brakes, new battery, good condi- 
tion, must sell $1,000 354-9406 

1991 FORD EXPLORER 4x4, 
160,000km, good condition, asking 
$3,500 obo. Phone 354-4278 

1980 CHEVY VAN, rebuilt motor, 
V8, excellent mechanical condition, 
needs new exhaust system. $900 
obo 265-0216 

1981 VOLKSWAGON WESTFALIA 
CAMPER Van. Sleeps 4, fridge, 
stove, sink. Newly rebuilt motor. 
$9,500 OBO 505-5201 

2003 TOYOTA TACOMA SR5 Very 
Rare Truck, Great Gas Mileage, 4 cyl. 
Auto, Looks New, 359-5000 

1992 FORD RANGER rebuilt clutch 
and transmission. 117,000 miles. 
$4,000 551-4800 

1985 FORD F150 with canopy, runs 
well, needs breaks and exhaust.$650 
obo. call 509-1808 

1990 MPV asking $2,800. obo Would 
consider tade or part trade for canoe/ 
boat/bike? 226-6760 



1990 SUZUKI SIDEKICK $4,000 
obo-toad w/1986 Glendale 26' M/H, 
solar, inverter, open-layout, M/C rack, 
$15,000obo. 825-9320 

1999 GMC SAFARI VAN awd load- 
ed power seats rear air 110,000km 
$10,500 well maintained 825-9424 

1988 MAZDA P.U. 2 WD, Cab plus, 
Great shape, 187,000 kms, canopy. 
It has noisy lifter, good deal at $1 ,300 
825-0168 

MUST SELL 1994 AWD Safari, 8 
pass., PS $2,300, less $20/day start- 
ing 15/06! 365-6671 msg. 



Boats 



20' FIBREGLASS BOAT w/tandem 
axle trailer, no motor $500 obo 352- 
5663 

RARE BATMOBILE STYLE 
BOAT. 1967 limited edition with trailer 
- previous owner Ian Hunter. Call 
John 825-9910 

NECKY"RIP" KAYAK forsale. Excellent 
condition. Great for lake or river. $250 
Please call Kevin :352-9235 

1972 CANAVENTURE 17.5FT fiber- 
glass 120hp mercruiser I/O 4.5 mere 
kicker towbar trailer $3,750 352-1303 
Keven 

HELLMAN 16' QUETICO Canoe 
with paddles, in new condition, retail 
$1,800+tax, asking $1,200 352-0531 



2 NECKY 16' kayaks with paddles. 
Both in excellent condition. 352-1896 

10 FOOT DELNOR Fiberglass boat 
$350 or swap for 7-8 foot or Sabot 
229-4559 

NECKY KAYAK. Older fibreglass 
boat, comes with paddle. Suitable 
for smaller person. $950/ OBO 505- 
5581 

Recreational 
Vehicles 

1986 21 FT CORSAIR MOTOR 
HOME, very clean, solar 125,000 
kms, $10,500 505-5029 

1984 FORD F150 Vanamera, low 
kms, loaded, mint condition, road 
ready new parts. Mike, 352-2500 

IMPORT CAMPER 7 1/2 foot, 3 way 
fridge, 3 burner stove, heater, good 
condition $1,000 226-7172 

17' TRAVEL TRAILER WITH 
WOODSTOVE, lots of windows. 
Great to live in. $1,500 obo. 229- 
4099 

14+3' Travel Trailer $1,300, no leaks, 
many extras and could use some 
TLC, 354-1344 

PROWLER TANDEM TRAILER, good 
summer accomodation, registration 
uncertain, f/s, furnace ,portapottie, 
$1600 obo. 352-1619 




TWSvmd 



"™.£5K 



I PRODUCTS LTD. 



250-359-7111 

www.playmorpower.com 



Page 22 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



Homefinders 



Lome Westnedge 
& Drew Evans: 

THE TEAM THAT 
WORKS -FOR YOU! 

Contact 352-7199 

Lome at: Lorne@rhcrealty.com 

Contact 505-2466 

Drew at: Drew@rhcrealty.com 

Web-site, www.nelsonrealestate.com 
Each office is independently owned and operated 





QUALITY FAMILY HOME 

3 bed. 2 bath well built and maintained 
low maintenance home with suite poten- 
tial. Large level landscaped lot, garden, 
greenhouse/storage area, covered deck, 
fenced backyard, R.V. parking. 

$349,000 mlsK1611888 



GREAT HOME, GREAT LOCATION 

Enjoy a convenient location in this 4 
bed. 2 bath, home on an oversized 
lot with private yard. Hardwood floors, 
gas fireplace, updated kitchen, original 
wainscoting and garage. 

$479,000 mlsk161241 



QUALITY HOME IN SALMO 

Clean, well designed newer 3 bed- 
room, 2 bath, home close to school 
and downtown on a level landscaped 
lot. Attached single garage, parking off 
back lane and workshop. 

$245,000 mlsK162379 



SUNNY ACREAGE IN BLEWETT 

4 bed. 2.5 bath. Home on 6 acres with 
good sun exposure. Private setting farm 
property with bam, oubuildings, estab- 
lished garden area, fruit trees, great views, 
great family locaiton. 

$369,000 mlsK162846 



Real Estate 

BLEWETT MORTGAGE HELPER 
- $900 rental income, solid 6 bdrm. 
house on 8 acres, 14 fruit trees, out- 
buildings, mountain view. 505-2060 

THINKING OF SELLING? Get 

a FREE, no obligation mar- 
ket evaluation of your home. Call 
Trevor@NelsonRealty.ca 354-8409 

SALMO LEVEL LOT (33m x 34m) 
Quiet street with new homes. 733 
Railway Ave. $52,000. 352-9133. 

$329,000 NELSON UPHILL 3 
Bedrooms + new floors, doors, win- 
dows, electrical, paint, office, play 
room, flat 352-0086 

WATERFRONT LOT KOOTENAY 
LAKE. Last of 2 fully serviced lots 
in Nelson's prestigious John's Walk 
Subdivision. Build your dream home 

5 minutes from town. Lot 25 $399,000 

6 lot 27 $429,000 No GST CALL 
Brent 250-354-7585 

GROW FOOD! Amazing garden and 
orchard in Riondel. 3 bedroom, 2 bath 
home $219 225-3296 

1.87 ACRES OF FENCED 
PROPERTY in a pastoral setting. 
11 year old house with 3-4 bed- 
rooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 car garage, 
24x24 carport, garden shed, good 
water(shared well), 25 minutes to 
Nelson or Castlegar. For more info 
call (250) 551-9064. 

PRIVATE, ONE ACRE lot with 12x60 
mobile in Procter. Close to lake, 
view potential. Mobile in good condi- 
tion and currently generates rental 
income. $74,800. Call Tracey 354- 
4078 



Rentals 



Rentals 



Rentals Wanted Rentals Wanted Vacation Rentals 



3 BEDROOM HOUSE RENTAL, par- 
tial basement and large garden, no 
smoking, no pets, $1,000, 359-6997 

FURNISHED ROOM IN HOUSE 
Castlegar. Internet/cable, phone incl. 
Big yard. Pet neg. N/S $450/mo. 
304-7806 

3 BEDROOM HOUSE on View 
Street. Hardwood floors, gardens, 
NS/NP, furnished/not July 1 $1,200 
with utilities 352-0408 

4 BEDROOM 2 BATH mobile in 
Lemon Creek. $800/month +utili- 
ties. Available August 1st. Call 
Rentals@NelsonRealty.ca 352-21 00 
WINLAW:BRIGHT/CLEAN 
BACHELOR SUITE. Private entrance/ 
kitchen/bathroom. Close to ameni- 
ties, treed property with gardens. 
$365/mo+heat. (250)226-7279 

NEWLY DECORATED 2 bedroom 
house. 6 Mile. $900 N/P. N/S. Private 
back yard. Porch. 229-5281 

BACHELOR SUITE IN Nelson for 
rent, N/S, N/P. 505-1178 

2000 SQFT RIVERSIDE p+beam 
house, 2baths, W/D, internet, pictur- 
esque, peaceful. Ymir. Non-smoking. 
Rent negotiable. 250-357-9242 or 
250-381-2307 

CONVENIENT CASTLEGAR 
LOCATION, furn 1 bdr + tv room. 
Separate ent. Laundry & utilities inc. 
N/S 304-7806 

JULY 1ST. Working, responsible 
female looking for single accom- 
modations. Excellent references. 
Lindsay 352-1726 



3-PLUS BDRM HOUSE, Salmo. f/s, 
w/d, d/w. close to everything, n/p, n/s. 
$800/month references. 352-3764 

ROOM 4 RENT. Great 2-bed down- 
town apartment. $375/mo + 1/2 
hydro/phone/internet. N/P, heat/hot 
water/laundry inc. Garden. 352-7809 

1 BEDROOM APT. Front St. walk- 
ing distance to everywhere. Available 
June 15-- pets ok- $500 354-7065 

SHARE 2 BEDROOM duplex 3 
blocks from Baker St. available July 
1 $400/month plus half utilities call 
352-5048 

SHORT TERM RENTAL 3 bedroom 

1 bath in Blewett. Available now until 
July 31st. $1000/month + utilities. 
Call Rentals@NelsonRealty.ca 352- 
2100 

2 BEDROOM FAIRVIEW SUITE, 
parking, view, deck, wd, fs, ns, np. 
$825 month plus utilities. July 1st 
352-5395 

2 BEDROOM SUBLET, perfect for a 
couple or small family, uphill Nelson, 
starting June15, 4 or 6 weeks $900/ 
mo, 354-4884 

Rentals - 
Commercial 

COUNSELOR WANTING TO SHARE 
SPACE. CALL Val @ 250-505-5077 
or 250-505-8044. 

Rentals Wanted 

CLEAN, 3 BEDROOM home needed 
for July 1. Family of 4, close to 
Nelson please. 250-707-3930 



YOUNG COUPLE WITH ONE BABE 
seeking a 1 or 2 bedrm home in 
Nelson. We have a very well behaved 
dog & need a yard (we're happy 
to fence it if it isn't already). We'd 
love hardwood, sunny windows & 
wood heat. We're excellent tenants 
with references. We'd like to move 
in between June 1 and September 
1 and look forward to the owner of 
our dream rental calling us. If you 
have a lead, please call Jennie at 
354-7812 

WORKING FEMALE NEEDING 
single accommodations $550/mth 
July 1st? Comes with dog, excellent 
references! Lindsay (250) 352-1726 

URGENTLY NEED A 3-BEDROOM 
house for July 1 st in Nelson. Excellent 
references, phone (306)584-2873 
jpphillips@accesscomm.ca/ 

BACHELOR SUITE OR 1 BDRM 
apartment, walking/bus distance to 
KSA, mature, non-smoking woman, 
as of Sept 1,2007. (604) 467-1651 

MAN WITH 2 DOGS, looking for a 
place to rent. I am a handyman with 
truck 505-5325 or 505-0665 

QUIET, RESPONSIBLE COUPLE 
with clean dog looking for home 
in Nelson starting July 1. N/S. 
References available. 

TEACHERAND NURSING STUDENT 
with two young children looking for 2 
bedroom apartment or home, begin- 
ning September. Dependable, low 
impact, n/s. Must be in Nelson or 
North Shore. (250) 227-8989 



COUPLE W/ 10YR OLD in need of 2- 
3bdrm house w/bsmt or storage close 
to or in Nelson 352-5954 

Shared Accom. 

DOWN TOWN HERITAGE house to 
share. $400 +bills. available now. 
pets considered. 352-3508. 

ROOM FOR EARTH ORIENTED 
female beautiful 3level white water, 
lotsa woods, fire pit, garden space 
352-9340 375+em. 

LARGE, FURNISHED ROOM for 
quiet person. N/S, W/D, by Gyro 
Park. $450 Starts July. 352-3936 

ROOM IN ROSEMONT $350 all 
inclusive, n/s n/p. I'm an easygoing 
mature female nursing student, with 
a quiet, creative, studious home envi- 
ronment. Seeking responsible female 
roomy who is either a focussed stu- 
dent or gainfully employed. No drugs 
or alcohol allowed on the premises, 
but I don't mind if you do these else- 
where (in moderation). 354-0231 

SPACIOUS UPHILL HOME, 2 rooms 
available, with garden, internet, cable 
TV $425 inclusive, Annely 352-2672 

SHARED ACCOM. DTNELSON. 
BALCONY, Lg bdrm w/ensuite, laun- 
dry, internet, furnished, N/S-N/Pets, 
Christine: 250-352-7755, or 1-800- 
611-5788 or 250-505-4277. 

Vacation Rentals 

DAILY/WEEKLY RENTAL- 

GORGEOUS HOUSE in prime 
location to all amenities in Nelson- 
AMAZING views, Quiet Location- 
250-352-7134 



SUMMER SUBLET - July/ Aug. Clean 
bright 2 bedroom apt. $800- per 
month. Call 505-3172 

VACATION RENTAL IN BEAUTIFUL 
KASLO. 4 Bedroom,2 baths, hot 
tub, short walk to beach & town. 
Reasonable. 1-888-366-4395 

ENJOY YOUR VACATION WEEK in 
uphill Nelson, ideal 2/3 people, hard- 
woodflr, sunlite, fireplace $500/wk 
summit@netidea.com 



Phil's Moving i 

mjixmudiHitsyi 

_ _ _ _ j 





EXPRESS 
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These ads appear in approxi- 
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The Express at 354-3910 
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AUTO FINANCING 



CAREER TRAINING 



AUCTIONS 



UNRESERVED AUCTION: Prime 
industrial land with exceptional front- 
age on Alberta's busiest corridor, Hwy 
2, Ponoka. Four parcels, 45+/- acres, 
110,000+/- sf buildings. Ritchie Bros. 
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Visit 'Real Estate': www.rbauction. 

com or call 1-877-675-5263. 

AUTO FINANCING 

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BUILDING MATERIALS 

HORIZON STRUCTURES fabric or 
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- horizonstructures@shaw.ca. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

WORK AT HOME ONLINE - Start 
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MUST SELL NOW. Hair & esthetic 
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utes from Vancouver). Six stations, 
$600/month lease, clientele, no staff, 
$10,000/obo. Contact Raymond, 
604-657-4505. 

$$$ MAKE FAST CASH. Driveway 
sealing systems, line painters, hot 
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BECOMEAN INTERIORDECORATOR 
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THERE IS A CRITICAL SHORTAGE 
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BECOME A HOME STAGER with 
our distance education course. Learn 
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GO WILD IN OUR CLASSROOMS! 
Train to be an adventure guide. 
Nine-month Outdoor Recreation & 
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888-690-4422; www.cnc.bc.ca/vale- 

mount. 

EDUCATION 

TRAIN TO BE an Apartment/ 
Condominium Manager. Many jobs 
registered! Thousands of graduates 
working. Online or home-study certi- 
fied course. Government registered. 
Information: www.RMTI.ca or 1-800- 

665-8339,604-681-5456. 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

CENTRAL VANCOUVER ISLAND! 
Required immediately! Carpenter / 
Foreman - above average wages and 
benefits. Afterone year of service, mov- 
ing expenses will be covered! Apply 
at windowsandsunrooms@vahoo.ca. 

CRUSHING FOREMAN with 5+ years 
experience required for portable HP 
400 Nordberg crusher w/54" JCI cone 
in a river rock crushing operation in 
Southern Alberta. Fax 403-568-1327. 
Email: edbom@southrock.ca. 

ARE YOU AN EXPERIENCED or 
inexperienced accountant looking for 
a smaller firm with bigger advan- 
tages? Heywood Holmes & Partners 
LLP is a dynamic chartered account- 
ing firm in central Alberta. We are 
looking to add motivated team play- 
ers to our small business, assurance, 
farm and tax groups. In addition 
to a broad experience, we provide 
continuing professional develop- 
ment, competitive compensation 
and benefits, and work/life balance. 
Please quote job #0601 b. To lean 
more and apply for positions, please 
visit: www.heywoodholmes.com. 
Email: office@hhpca.net. Fax: 403- 
343-6140. Mail: Heywood Holmes & 
Partners LLP, First Red Deer Place, 
#500, 4911 - 51 St., Red Deer, AB, 
T4N 6V4. 



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

PHONE DISCONNECTED? Low 
rates! Paying too much? Switch for 
free! Only $24.95 for first month + 
connection fee! Phone Factory 
Reconnect, 1-877-336-2274; www. 
phonefactorv.ca. 

BOUMA MEATS in Provost, Alberta 
under new ownership looking for 
retail meat cutters and butchers. 
Wages negotiable. Benefits available. 
Phone: 780-753-2092. Fax: 780-753- 
4939. Plant: 780-753-2973. 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT Operator/Class 
1 driver. Chevalier Geo-Con, a heavy 
equipment contractor based in Rocky 
Mountain House, Alberta is looking 
for experienced Cat, hoe and mulcher 
operators. Please fax resume to 403- 
844-2735. 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER (C.A.O.) 
OPPORTUNITY - historic Fort 
Macleod, Alberta, a growing com- 
munity of 3100 and future home of 
the Alberta Police and Peace Officer 
Training Centre, is seeking a team 
leader. Candidates should have 
municipal government experience, 
a firm understanding of grants and 
strong accounting, computer, budget- 
ing and people skills. Applications 
can be sent to Mayor and Council, 
Box 1420, Fort Macleod, AB, T0L 
0Z0. Fax: 403-553-2426 or email: 
mayor@fortmacleod.com. 

CHEAPEST RATES: switch for free 
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calls & the worry. Avoid bankruptcy. 
Contact us for a No-Cost Consultation. 
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toll-free 1-877-556-3500. 

FOR SALE MISC. 

RECONNECT YOUR HOME PHONE! 
No one refused! Lowest rates avail- 
able. Unlimited local calling. Great 
long distance rates. Transfer for free. 
Call National Teleconnect 1 -866-443- 
4408, www.nationalteleconnect.com 



FOR SALE MISC. 



NEW LOADED COMPUTER ONLY 
99 cents/day! Everyone's approved*. 
Get a loaded MDG computer right to 
your doorstep from only 99 cents/day. 
Includes everything you need: 1 GB 
RAM, 250 GBHD, 19" LCD flat panel, 
Windows Vista & more; plus get a 
free* printer/scanner/copier (*call for 
conditions) 1-800-236-2504. 

SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $3,495.00 
- convert your logs to valuable lum- 
ber with your own Norwood por- 
table band sawmill. Log skidders also 
available, www.norwoodindustries. 
com - free information: 1-800-566- 
6899, extension:400OT 

AT LAST! An iron filter that works. 
IronEater! Fully patented Canada/ 
U.S.A. Removes iron, hardness, 
sulfur, smell, manganese from well 
water. Since 1957. Phone 1-800-BIG 
IRON; www.bigirondrilling.com. 
FURNITURE 

FACTORY DIRECT memory foam 
mattresses: 8" queen $399, twin 
$299. Toppers: 2" queen $199, twin 
$99. Free velour. Cover/shipping. 
1-778-329-2801 / 1-778-319-3389. 
Memory Mattress Factory (Canada) 
HELP WANTED 

OLYMEL IS A WORLD-CLASS 
Canadian pork and poultry prod- 
uct producer, with more than 9,000 
employees throughout Canada. Our 
Red Deer location is now hiring food 
processing workers. Competitive 
wages, relocation program, employ- 
ee incentives!!! Send your resume 
to OLYMEL 7550-40th Avenue, Red 
Deer, Alberta T4N-6R7. Phone: 1- 
866-926-3544. Fax: (403) 309-7547. 
applv@olymel.com, www.olymel.ca. 

DOG LOVERS! Enjoy a healthy, 
profitable career as a professional 
dog trainer. Government accredited 
program - student loans and grants. 
Ben Kersen & the Wonderdogs. www. 
wonderdogs.bc.ca. 1-800-961-6616 

WE WORK YOU like a horse, but 
give you lots of money for oats. Call 
Ron at 1-888-765-4401, extension 
112. www.watercanada.ca. Email: 
ron@watercanada.ca. 



RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 

OVER 200 NEW & used motorhomes, 
diesel pushers, 5th wheels, trailers, 
vans, campers. Total RV Centre. 
Special RV financing. Since 1984, 
Voyager RV - Hwy 97, Winfield, BC. 
1-800-668-1447. www.vovagerRV.ca. 
SERVICES 

CLEAR CRIMINAL RECORDS with 
the National Pardon Centre. Your 
peace of mind guaranteed. Remove 
barriers to employment, travel, more. 
Free consultations. 1-866-242-2411. 
Apply online: www.nationalpar- 
don.org. Member: Better Business 

Bureau. 

STEEL BUILDINGS 

ALL STEEL BUILDINGS! 
SUBSTANTIALLY discounted prices 
with special share loading freight 
costs. 25x40, 30x40, 32x80, 35x50, 
40x60, 50x80. Others. Pioneer 
Manufacturing, 1-800-668-5422. 

Since 1980. 

TRAVEL 

TIMESHARE RESALES - sell-buy- 
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broker. Stroman Realty - since 1979. 
Worldwide selection of resort proper- 
ties. Call today toll-free, 1-800-201- 
0864. 

TIMESHARE RESALES - 60-80% 
off retail! Best resorts & seasons! Call 
for free Timeshare Magazine! 1-800- 
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TIMESHARE RESALES - LUXURY 
VACATIONS. Buy-sell-rent. Anywhere 
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Rapid resale. Call today, relax tomor- 
row! Toll-free, 1-800-752-5714. 



Download 

Express 

photos online 

www.expressnews.ca 



www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



June 13, 2007 EXPRESS Page 23 



Sports & Recreation 

Thanks to dads who encourage health 



This is dedicated 
to all the great dads 
who support and nur- 
ture their children! 

Fathers have a 
huge impact on the 
development and 



ii 



Fathers have a 
huge impact on the 

enrichment of their develoment and 
children's lives, enrichment of their 

Fortunately, I was chi l dren > s U ves 

blessed to have a 
father who enriched 
my childhood. 

Our family emi- 
grated from the man- 
icured, tamed land- 
scape of the British 
Isles, to the vast wilderness of 
British Columbia. My Dad was in 
heaven! 

His passion to explore this 
beautiful province enabled me to 
see the old growth forest of the 
Elaho Valley before it was logged, 
camp on Long Beach before it 
was a national park, and fish in 
Howe Sound sounded by orcas. 

He taught me how to follow 
game trails into unknown ter- 



ritory relying on a 
map and compass: 
no G.P.S. then. 

His awe and love 
of nature, spilled 
into me, giving me 
an outlet for my 
spiritual well-being. 
He taught me how 
to swim, a skill that 
took me to employ- 
ment and enjoyment. 
I'd ride around on 
his back kicking my 
legs - when courage 
took me I'd let go 
and paddle on my 
own, knowing the solid, human 
life raft would always be there. 

The women's movement would 
not have increased its momen- 
tum without men like my father. 
He encouraged and supported my 
mother's career and was thankful, 
rather than threatened, that she 
earned more money that he did. 

This view of equality was 
encouraged with lessons in car 
repairs for both of his daughters 



Keeping Fit 




Helen Kissinger 



and son. He 
taught 
basics, like 
replacing 
brake pads, 
changing 
the oil and 
filter, chang- 
ing the uni- 
versal joint, 



changing the spark plugs and any 
minor repair. Many times these 
lessons manifested themselves in 
me watching him take apart some 
engine part, and asking my kid- 
like questions. 

One of the best lesson's he 
taught me was, if a rusty bolt in 
a tight spot takes your frustra- 
tion level to a new height, "take 
five." 

That five always seems to 
resolve the problem for many 
things in life. 

Thanks for all you have taught 
me dad! 

And a big thanks to all the 
dads who love and nurture their 
children. 



Helen Kissinger is the owner/ operator of Renew Personal Training and a local resident She has been helping 
people achieve their health and fitness goals for 20 years. Do you have a fitness question for Helen? Send by email to 

express® expressnews. be. ca 




ACUPUNCTURE 

MATUftAL HI AITH tl INir 

Shauna Robertson, R.Ac. 

352-2167 

101 -518 Lake Street 
Nelson, BC 

www.anhc.ca 



(Acupressure & Massage) 
for the treatment of. . . 

• Neck pain 

• Shoulder pain 

• Back pain 

• Golf & tennis elbow 

• Covered by most 
extended health plans 

• Student & senior discounts 




A Community Conversation on 
Physical Activity and Play in 
Children and Youth 



The Get Out Get Active 

committee is hosting a 
community conversation 
to give those interested an 
opportunity to participate in 
shaping the future actions of 
GOGA. 

Who should attend? 
Anyone with an interest in 
supporting physical activity 
and play in children and 
youth in Nelson and area. 

GOGA's mission is to provide 
children and youth with 
opportunities, support and 
encouragement to play 
and be physically active for 
optimal health. 



GOGA 



June 18 
6:30 pm 

2 nd floor, Chamber 

of Commerce Office, 

225 Hall St 

For more 

information 

and to register call 

505-7200 

or email 
palmanage@shaw.ca 




QOS^ffiDOt? 



Villas at Granite Poi 

: 1 & Phase II SOLD OUT! Now Presellins F 



Ml 



This project is a phased strata plan 
with only 32 units available for sale. 
Each phase consists of one building 
with 4 corner 
units. Each unit 
offers approx. 
1600 sqft with 
bilevel entry, 3 
bedrooms 21/2 
bathrooms, a 
natural gas fire- 
place, heated 
tile floors in 
the main bath- 
rooms, dramatic 18 feet high vaulted 
ceilings with spacious loft, dormer style 




skylights, private decks, hardwood floors 
and more. A community in harmony 
with its environment. A place where the 
excitement of 
an active out- 
door life, filled 
with limitless 
year-round 
possibilities is 
a way of liv- 
ing. And the 
challenge of 
a favourite 
Kootenay golf 
course is right at your doorstep. 
GST is payable on the purchase price. 



Units 301 -304 $289,000 
Units 302 & 303 $284,500 




RB0MBCRHC Realty n« 

601 Baker Street, Nelson • 352-7252 ^ A L 



■tfHh 



each office independently owned and operated 



www.kootenayproperties.com 



Proudly presented to you by 

Tad Lake 
354-2979 

^ Ross Lake 
| 354-8403 



Take a break from the sum- 
mer heat. 

The Nelson Figure Skating 
Club is once again offering 
Summer Skating Lessons 
at the Nelson and District 
Community Complex Arena. 

Join them for Canskate and 
CanPowerSkate lessons 
Aug. 13 to 17 and 20 to 24. 
For more information phone 
Jane Macleod 352-6510. 
Register Wednesday, June 
13, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the 
complex. 



SUBMITTED 




&3HELLMAN 

CANOES & KAYAKS 

PADDLESTORE 



Seaward, Boreal Design, Lightspeed, 
Clearwater Kayaks & sit on tops, Think-Kayaks, 
Advance Elements, Hobie Kayaks, Davidson 
Row Boats, Fishing sit on tops. 



FREE LESSONS WHEN YOU BUY A BOAT. 



www.hellmancanoes.com 
2645 Hwy 3A, Nelson, BC • 250.825.9571 



S£ WMM RHC Realty R Tad ^ e * 4 ;*T, 

' 601 Baker Street, NelSOn each office independently owned and operated KOSSLSiKe 354-8403 

Brady Lake 354-8404 



www.kootenayproperties.com 



Vid* 



Sand, Sand everywhere 

$ 1 ,695,000 

This is without a doubt one of the nicest beaches 
on Kootenay Lake. Situated on the point is a 2700 
sqft Rancher designed to take in the panoramic 
lake view. There's another 2 bedroom cabin and 
four guest houses which are basic, but could 
accommodate guests. Property boasts over 300 ft 
of frontage located only 7 miles from Nelson. 



Mountain Chalet $449,000 

This spectacular home is situated on 1 8.28 acres 
and offers 2,700 sq ft of finished living area with 
views from every room. This chalet offers vaulted 
ceilings, in floor radiant heat, tile floors, post 
and beam construction and much more. Also on 
property is 500 sq ft shop with storage loft that 
is heated and plumbed. The adjacent 19.6 acres 
may be available as well for added privacy. 









■*"'* 1 T 




iH *H 





Country Living $495,000 

The perfect balance of privacy, view and space. 
This Alpine style home is conveniently located 
only minutes from Kaslo at historic Shutty Bench. 
Property offers views of the impressive Purcell 
peaks as well as Kootenay Lake. Inside consists 
of fine crafted finishes throughout the 3 bed, and 3 
bath Log home. Call today! 




Easy Living $395,000 

Roughly 1 ,200 sq ft of condo living located on the 
top floor of Nelson's newest condo development. 
Situated on the South West corner of the building 
proves to be an optimal location for afternoon sun 
and lake views. Some great features include: gran- 
ite countertops, wood floors, over 350 sq ft of patio 
just to name a few. A covered underground parking 
stall and storage locker are also included. 



m% 



Building Lot With Views 
$199,000 

Premium building lot at Sunny Taghum only min- 
utes from Nelson. South exposure and excellent 
views of Kootenay River and mountains beyond. 
Water is available at lot line. This property is just 
shy of an acre, and awaits your Contemporary 
home. Must see! 



m itM 



I 



Looking For A Good Buy? 
$340,000 

There are few homes in Nelson that can match 
the curb appeal that this house presents. Located 
on a 59 x 100 ft corner lot, this property would 
prove to be ideal for the young family starting out. 
The house offers a great all around floor plan and 
boasts over 1 ,938 sq ft of living area. Call today 
for more details. 




JB.-t.HB.-mml 



THURS 

£dL>High 15°C 
Low9°C 

Light rain 
P.O.P 60% 



FRI 

■ High20°C 
Low 5°C 

Mainly sunny 
P.O.P 0% 



SAT SUN MON 



High 22°C T^High 29°C 
Low11°C V-^T Low6°C 



Cloudy periods 
P.O.P 10% 



Sunny 
P.O.P 0% 



High 29°C 
Low 4°C 

Cloudy periods 
P.O.P 10% 



Get the BEST 

Service from 

Nelson's #1 

REAL ESTATE TEAM 



Page 24 EXPRESS June 13, 2007 




www.expressnews.ca 



express@expressnews.bc.ca 



CITY OF NELSON NEWS • JUNE 13, 2007 



Mailing Address: Suite 101, 310 Ward Street, Nelson, BC V1L 5S4 • email: info@city.nelson.bc.ca 



Phone: 352-5511 • Fax: 352-2131 • website: www.city.nelson.bc.ca 



nelson 



PROPOSED PUBLIC HEARING 

KUTENAI LANDING 

Kutenai Landing Public Hearing is tentatively scheduled for 5 pm on June 2 1 . 
Details will be posted on the City's website after the Council Meeting of June 
11,2007. 



NEW FACE FOR CIVIC CENTRE 

The Heritage Commission recently supported a proposal to change 
the facade colour scheme of the Civic Centre as submitted by 
City staff. Designer, David 



Dobie of Nelson, BC, provid- 
ed the City with the following 
new paint scheme for the Civic 
Centre's scheduled repainting 
this summer, to be complet- 
ed by Summit Painting Co. of 
Crescent Valley, BC. 



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NELSON HYDRO CUSTOMER ADVISORY 

High Power Consumption 

Nelson Hydro receives numerous complaints regarding high billing. When a 
customer calls the Hydro Clerk for clarification or general complaint, we will 
have our staff check the meter reading for accuracy to compare annual historical 
consumption. Any errors found will either be credited to your account or billed 
additional. You may challenge the accuracy of the meter if you wish, as man- 
dated by the Federal Agency, Measurement Canada. If you feel that your bill is 
too high, you should take the following steps to reduce your consumption: 

1. Hot Water 

Electric hot water tanks consume the most energy in your home. They are 
factory set for about 80°C. Reduce this setting to about 55 - 60°C. 

2. Lighting 

Lighting accounts for about 10% of the total energy consumption. Turn out 
your lights and save. 

3. Heating 

Electric heating costs can easily be reduced by turning off heaters in spare 

rooms and turning off heat during the night. 
If you have concerns about your bi-monthly bill, please call the Nelson Hydro 
metering customer service representative at 250-352-8223 and we will be 
pleased to answer your questions. 








PUBLIC WORKS 

Parks Department Update 

It's that time of year - The City's Parks staff have been busy cleaning up and 
beautifying Nelson's hundreds of acres of parks, display gardens, playing fields 
and City boulevards. On June 15 th , 90 flower baskets will be hung around town 
helping Nelson maintain its status as one of the most beautiful places to live. 

The Lakeside Park concession stand is now open and the public beach washroom 
is open daily from 8:00 am to 9:30 pm during the summer months. 

For the Little Ones - Gyro Park pool will be opening 7 days a week except for 
statutory holidays, from July 3 rd until August 31st. Hours of operation will be 
1:00 pm to 6:00 pm, with a lifeguard on duty. Please note the age restriction of 
13 years old and under for the use of this free pool. 

The City is reviewing the assessment of a large Yellow Pine tree in Gyro Park 
that has been assessed as a public safety hazard and is showing signs of deterio- 
ration. The tree is located just east of the washrooms, and is leaning heavily over 
Gyro Park Road. A report will be completed prior to any action being taken. 

The City would like to remind residents to be mindful of water conservation, by 
keeping sprinkling and running water to a minimum. 




_jCX«% NELSON & DISTRICT YOUTH CENTRE 



•W 



NELSON AND DISTRICT YOUTH CENTRE 



Columbia Basin Trust and the Nelson District Youth 
Centre is proud to present a Red Carpet Film Premier of 
the Regional Peer Support Film "Peers 'R' Here". The Premier will be show- 
ing on Thursday June 21 st at 6:30 pm at the Capitol Theatre. Come support this 
amazing youth initiative. For more information & tickets (by donation) contact 
Stacey @ 352-5656. 



The Summer Skate Tour 

Justin Moroz, a local skateboarder and the NDYC's 
Skateboard Instructor is leading The Summer Skate 

Tour youth will travel together to four different skate 

parks in four different towns in July and August and will 
spend the day skateboarding a new park! The dates are: 



• Castlegar - July 5 

• Grand Forks - August 2 

Details: 



Kaslo- July 19 
Penticton - August 16 




• Cost is $100 - pre-registration a must 

• Age: 12 and up. Sign up now to book a seat - seats are limifed! 

• Contact Jo or Justin at 352-5656 or stop by 608 Lake Street for info 



For June's schedule of activities call 352-5656, check out the NDYC website 
@www.ndyc.com or pick up a schedule at 608 Lake Street. 



The Nelson and District Credit Union continues to sponsor an annual $500 bursa- 
ry for a local student or youth who want to expand their horizons. The youth must 
have contributed to NDYC. For more information call 352-5656. Applications 
can be picked up at 608 Lake Street. 



jJlk 



NELSON MUNICIPAL LIBRARY 



Hours - Mon, Wed, - 11 am - 8 pm / Tues, Thurs, Fri, Sat - 11 am - 6 pm flU 



/ 



*& 




Catch the Reading Bug! 

That's the theme for this year's Summer Reading Program for ages 6 to 12. 
Reading, drama, crafts, and lots of fun activities beginning in July. Watch for 
details! 

Teens: The library needs you to tell us what you want to see! The Teen 
Advisory Board now has an email address: nelsontab@yahoo.ca. Also, stay 
tuned for details for this summer's Teen Online Summer Reading Club. 




NEED MORE INFORMATION? 

Visit the City of Nelson's award winning website at www.city.nelson.bc.ca. If you do not have 
go to the Nelson Library where computers are available for public use. 



internet access,