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Full text of "Expression Of The Emotions In Man And Animals"

66

THE PRINCIPLE OF THE  DIRECT   CHAK III.

CHAPTER III.

GENERAL PRINCIPLES or EXPRESSION—concluded.

The principle of direct action of the excited nervous sys-
tem on the body, independently of the will and in part
of habit—Change of colour in the hair—Trembling- of
the muscles—Modified secretions—.Perspiration—Ex-
pression of extreme pain—Of rage, great joy, and
terror—Contrast between the emotions which cause
and do not cause expressive movements—Exciting and
depressing states of the mind—Summary.

WE now come to our third Principle, namely, that cer-
tain actions which we recognize as expressive of certain
states of the mind, are the direct result of the consti-
tution of the nervous system, and have been from the
first independent of the will, and, to a large extent, of
habit. When the sensorium is strongly excited nerve-
force is generated in excess, and is transmitted in certain
directions, dependent on the connection of the nerve-
cells, and, as far as the muscular system is concerned,
on the nature of the movements which have been ha-
bitually practised. Or the supply of nerve-force may,
as it appears, be interrupted. Of course every movement
which we make is determined by the constitution of
the nervous system; but actions performed in obedience
to the will, or through habit, or through the principle
of antithesis, are here as far as possible excluded. Our
present subject is very obscure, but, from its impor-

t