(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

THE THEORY OF JETS

69

gas and of the air multiplied by coefficients proportional to their
weight.    Now the ratio of the weights (1) in this case is equal to

1.81  X1.069^1.9349 = 37.26 per cent
2.525X1.29      3.2575    62.74 per cent

Therefore for Furnace No. 20, for example, the result is

For the air:   21.8X0.6274 = 13.6773
.For the gas:  29.6X0.3726=11.0290

The diagonal of the parallelogram for these two values is equal
to 24 m 50 per second at an inclination of 27. The results, which
will be obtained for the other furnaces by similar computations,
are given in the following table:

Number
	Average
	Average

of
	Angle
	Velocity

Furnace
	ex..
	V.


	Degrees
	Meters per Second

20
	27
	24.00

21
	29
	21.20

23
	33
	17.30

24
	25
	24.50

25
	29
	21.00

Inserting the above values in the formula
?;2 sin2 a    273+*,

// --- ~~       pj        ~ /N ~       *

with the values of v and a. given in the table and assuming that
kn=1850 and that H equals the difference in level between the
sill of the gas port and the tapping hole, the temperature U at
which the stream of flame drops to the level of the hearth at the
tapping hole may be computed as follows, in order to determine
the temperature to which the gases filling the furnace must be
raised before it becomes possible to start making the bottom:
(1) It should be remembered that at 0 the volume per second of the gas is
1.81, and its specific weight is 1.069. The volume of the air is 2.525 and its
specific weight 1.29.