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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

PART II

PRINCIPLES FOR THE RATIONAL CONSTRUCTION OF

FURNACES

THE problems of furnace construction will be solved when it is
possible to regulate the temperature within the enclosure of their
'                    heating chambers according to the requirements of the material
t                     to be heated.    The gas passes from the firebox into the heating
(                    chamber   without   having   completed   combustion.    The   first
*'                    problem to be solved, therefore, is to afford space in the heating
chamber within which combustion may be completed.    With a
short concentrated core of burning gases the highest temperatures
are obtained.   At other times, according to the material and the
method by which it must be heated, it is necessary to prevent the
formation of a jet of burning gases and to provide a general
combustion of the gases throughout the heating chamber (a long,
t                    soft flame).
*                            The second problem is in the heating, by means of the hot gases
obtained, of those objects which have been placed in the heating
!                     chamber of the furnace for this purpose.
f                         For the time being, the first of these problems will be neglected,
and this portion of the present work will be devoted exclusively
to the solution of the second problem, which may be more definitely
stated as follows: In what manner may the hot gases be circulated
so that they will, in the most perfect manner, surround the objects
being heated and be carried out of the heating chamber, in order
|                    that their place may be taken by hotter gases?    In what manner
1                    may the heating chamber be adapted to obtain such a circulation
I                    of the hot gases?
*                             The solution of this second problem is very simple, but in
I                     spite of its simplicity it is very poorly understood by practicing
I                     furnace  designers.    Upon the following  pages  are  collected a
I                     number of designs of furnaces which have been operated or are