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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

DESIGN  OF OPEN-HEARTH FURNACES

213

without a considerable loss in its heating power due to the dis-
sociation of the hydrocarbons. Furnaces fired with these gases,
as well as those fired with oils or tars, are designed to preheat the
air supply only, but it is usually desirable to design the regenera-
tors for these furnaces in such a manner that producer gas may be
substituted without extensive and costly alterations.

VOLUME OF CHECKER BRICK

There seems to be a considerable diversity of opinion regarding
the amount of checker brick which should be used. Table 6
gives the data covering the volume of the checker brick in a
number of furnaces. These data have been plotted in Fig. 152

JLW
 130 120 110
 100
 jao
 3
 70 60 50 40 3C
	
	
	
	
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	0       10       20      30      40       50      GO      70       80      90      10 Tons
									
FIG. 152.—Graphical Comparison of the Volume of Air Plus Gas Checker
Brickwork in Cubic Feet per Ton of Nominal Capacity for Furnaces of
Various Capacities.
which compares the total amount of the air and gas checkerwork
per ton of nominal capacity. Table 7 gives the maximum and
the minimum volumes of checkerwork.
In all data of this kind there are two uncertain factors. The
nominal and the actual capacity of an open-hearth furnace are
different. It happens quite frequently that the actual capacity