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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"


I' \

248                                  APPENDIX VII

TABLE 10—Continued
REVERSING VALVES AND CHIMNEYS IN PRACTICE


	
	Valve
	Area
	
	
	Chimney
	

Nominal Furnace Capacity,
	
	
	SqFtr
	>er Ton
	
	Area o:
	*SqFt

Tons
	Gas, SqFt
	Air, SqFt
	Gas
	Air
	Height,
 Ft
	Bore,
 SqFt
	Per Ton

75-1
	9 42
	13.00
	0.126
	0.173
	
	
	

75-A
	9 42
	12 56
	0 126
	0 167
	
	
	

75-3
	8 70
	12 56
	0 116
	0 167
	
	
	

75-D
	7 10
	10 50
	0 095
	0 140
	
	
	

75-2
	
	
	
	
	165
	20.36
	0.271

80-1
	
	
	
	
	
	15.80
	0.198

100-3
	
	
	
	
	
	19 60
	0.196

100-H 100-E 100-4 100-D
	10.00 8.75 9.42
 8 70
	10.00 8.75 15.90 12 60
	0.100 0.088 0.094 0 087
	0.100 0.088 0.159 0 126
	180 180 160
	28.25 50.00 28.25
	0.285 0.500 0.283

150-1
	
	
	
	
	150
	23.70
	0.158

200-4
	7.00
	12.56
	0.035
	0.063
	180
	38.50
	0.385

Some of these valves are so heavy as to require electric motors,
or some other form of power, for their operation. In these cases
the control is located on a pulpit at a central location on the charg-
ing floor, in the rear of the furnace. Smaller and lighter valves
are operated by cables or levers led into the pulpit. Heavy valves
have considerable inertia, and for this reason cannot be operated
as rapidly, even by power, as the smaller valves with lighter moving
parts.
Furnaces fired by natural gas, oil, coke-oven gas or tar require
reversing valves for the air only, the fuel being reversed by shut-
ting off the jet at one end of the furnace and turning on the jet
at the opposite end. Some of these furnaces are supplied with one
checker chamber at each end, while others are so constructed,