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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

HEAT CAPACITY AND  CALORIFIC INTENSITY CURVES   365

TABLE 7

AIR SUPPLY, OXYGEN REQUIRED AND PRODUCTS OF COMBUSTION OF THE
USUAL COMBUSTIBLES

This table is based upon the assumption that air = l volume of oxygen, 02-f-4 volumes
of nitrogen, N2. This assumption is sufficiently accurate for most purposes and greatly
simplifies the work of computation. If greater accuracy is desired, use 3.8 volumes for N2
and 4.8 volumes for air.

The volumes may be considered as cubic feet, cubic meters, ounce molecules or gram
molecules as desired for the purpose in hand.

Substance Burned, 1 Volume
	Molecular
		Oxygen Required,
			d
	Required
	Products of Complete Combustion with Air.
				
	|
	bfl
	o w
 ?;
	Jo
	3
			|8
	.20 QO
	O
 w S
	I
 o
	""3 o

	&
	
	"
	p*
	
	
	^
	3
	0
	
	2
	
Hydrogen. . . . Carbon* to CO Carbon* ......
	H2 C
 CO CH4
 C2EU
 c2!6
 S
 s
	2 12 12
 28 16 26 28 30 78
 32 32
	0.5
	
	0.5
	2 0
	2.5
	
	
	1.0
	2.0 2.0 4.0
 2.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 30.0
 4.0 0.0
	3.0 3.0 5.0
 3.0 11.0 13.0 10. 0 19.0 39.0
 5.0 7.0

				0.5 1.0
	0.5 1.0
	2.0 4 0
	2.5 5.0
	1.0
	i 6
			
Carbon   monoxide ......
			'i.'o'
 0.5 1.0 1.5 1.5
	0.5 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 6.0
	0.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 7.5
 1 0
	2.0 8.0 10.0 12.0 14.0 30.0
 4 0
	2.5 10.0 12.5 15.0 17.5 37.5
 5 0
	"s62"
 1 0
	1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 6.0
	'2.'6' 1.0 2.0 3.0 3.0
		
[Methane
												
Acetylene. . . . Ethylenc ..... Ethane. .
												
Benzene
												
Sulphur
												
Sulphur ......
			
	
	1.5
	6.0
	7.5
	1.0
	
	
		
			
	
					
	
		
* Carbon may be considered as a gas or as a solid.

TABLE 8

HEAT CAPACITY IN B.T.U. OP GASES MEASURED FROM 32 TO t = T491
PEE CUBIC FOOT OF GAS

Temperature, Degrees F.
	N2 = 28, O2 = 32, H2 = 2, CO = 28
	H2O=18
	C02 = 44
	CH4 = 16

32
	0.00
	0.00
	0.00
	0.00

392
	7.00
	8.71
	9.32
	11.03

752
	14.21
	18.59
	20.1
	24.43

1112
	21.71
	29.57
	32.44
	40.4

1472
	29.32
	41.46
	45.7
	57.7

1832
	37.43
	55.31
	62.57
	79.44

2192
	45.59
	69.87
	78.33
	102.6

2552
	54.05
	85.64
	96.5
	128.2

2912
	62.77
	102.5
	116.4
	156.1

3272
	71.58
	120.2
	137.1
	180.6

3632
	80.85
	139.8
	160.4
	219.4

3992
	90.22
	160.3
	184.6
	254.6

4352
	99.94
	181.9
	210.4
	292.3

4712
	109 . 87
	204.6
	237.6
	3-32.7

5072
	120
	229.9
	266.2
	374.9

5432
	130.4
	255.1
	296 . 5
	419.8

Adapted from Les Sources de L'Energie Calorifique, by Damour, Carnot and Rengade.
NOTE.AS CBU and other hydrocarbons (CnKxn) break up at low temperatures around
1450 F., their heat capacity is valueless and such gases cannot be preheated successfully.
Some data as to the dissociation of CH4 and CHW were given on page 1014 of The Iron Age,
April 24, 1913.