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Full text of "The Flow Of Gases In Furnaces"

366

APPENDIX X

TABLE 9

Heat capacity in calories of gases above 0 per gram molecule (or for
22.32 liters ==0.78822 cubic foot of gas).

Tempera-
	N2 = 2S,
	
	
	
	

ture C.
 *=r-273
	O2 = 32, H2= 2,
	H20 = 18
	CO2-44
	CH4 = 16
	Molecular weights given

Degrees
	CO = 28
	
	
	
	in grams

0 200 400
	0.00 1.39
 2.82
	0.00 1.73 3.69
	0.00 1.85 3.99
	0.00 2.19
 4.85
	B.t.u. per cubic foot = 5.03794X calories per gram molecule

600 800 1000
	4.31
 5.82 7.43
	5.87 8.23 10.98
	6.44 9.07 12.42
	8.02 11.46 15.77
	Ounce molecule = 22.32 cubic feet

1200 1400 1600 1800
	9.05 10.73 12.46 14.21
	13.87 17.00 20.35 23.86
	15.55 19.18 23.10 27.21
	20.37 22.44 30.99 35.86
	B.t.u. per ounce molecule = 112.472077X calories per gram molecule

2000 2200 2400 2600
	16.05 17.01 19.84 21.81
	27.76 31.82 36.10 40.62
	31.84 36.65 41.76 47.16
	43.55 50.54 58.02 66.04
	Calories per cubic meter =44.80287 X calorics per gram molecule

Heat capacity values are based on the formulas developed by Mallard
and Le Chatelier.
As hydrocarbon gases dissociate when exposed to high temperatures the
heat capacity values for CH4 have a theoretical value above 800.
Simmersbach in Journal of Chemical Industry, Feb. 28, 1913, page 186,
and in Journal fur Gasbeleuchtung, Dec. 13, 1913, page 1242, gives data
covering his experiments in regard to the decrease in heating value of gases
containing hydrocarbons.