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file:///X|/Special%20Collections/purgatory/Phi%20Mu/Scott,%20Robert%20E/blueprint.txt[5/16/2011 10:50:21AM] 



THE HI3T0RY AND CONSTRUCTION OP THE POPE'S ARBEIT BRANCH 
OF T f IS PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD. 



A thesis prepared and written by Robert Edward 
Scott as an Initiation i-eiuirement of the Maryland Beta 
Chapter of the Tau Beta PI Fraternity, and presented by 
him to that organization January 13, 1°33. 






A great deal of appreciation is expressed to 
Mr. J. F. A 1,! art1n, who enjoyed forty-five years ser- 
vice with the road, Mr J. A. Relnhart, the Station ftgent 
at Marlboro, and ''.r. Horace Anderson of the T^shington 
Terminal for thei^ helpful information Credit for munh 
of the material must be given to a host of ^embers of the 
official staff of the Pennsylvania Railroad whose courteous 
coooeration was a pleasant experience. 



3IHLI0GSAFHT 

"The Pennsylvania Railroad System" , an historical and 
descriptive pamphlet with an annotated map, 

"The Growth and Development of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
nompany" by Howard Ward Schotter. 

"History of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company" in two 
volumes . 

"The Pennsylvania Railroad" by C. D Fox and F. Fox. 

The "American Railway* edition of 1889. 



A SHORT SHUMA^Y OP THE T^S T^ . 

The first railroad connecting the two cities of Balti- 
more, lid. and Washington, D 6. was ths Baltimore a nd Ohio The 
planters of the lower counties of Maryland early realized the 
great necessity of a railroad through Southern Maryland "'hie 1 -' 
would afford them transportation to these two great commercial 
centers. The Baltimore and Ohio refused to listen to t^eir pleas 
and the natives desiring such a ro3d were forced to orga ize into 
a stock "omnany. After a tre m endou« amount of work they were 
formed into a "ompany known as the Baltimore and Potomac %»Urosd 
Company. This organization was granted a charter in 1853 for th« 
construction of a railroad from Baltimore, Md. to the Potoraa^ 
Riv«™ *>**ween Liverpool Point and the mouth of q t. Mary* a River, 

Under th« terms of the charter permission was g^ven for 
the construction of branches not exceeding twenty "lies in length. 
The distance from Bowie, Md. to Washington, D-". f s only eighteen 
miles, so the railroad, as originally built, consisted o^ the -^ain 
line from Baltimore to Pope f s nreek, a distance of seventy- three 
miles, and the rt branch" from Bowie to Washington. The road was 
placed in service between Baltimore and Washington in July 1879, 
but the main line from Bowie to "Pooe's Creek was not opened to 
traffic until the following year. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad Company had been seeking for 
many years an Independent route to ^ltimore, Washington and the 
<*outh. The Baltimore and Ohio by their lack of cooperation un- 
wittingly aided the Pennsylvania in their efforts. As a result 



-2- 



the Pennsylvania Railroad Company became the re^l power behind 
the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad fie* piny, hut it wis not until 
November 1, 1902 that It assumed entire control of tbe latter 
company. The advent of the motor truck vms a prime f-ictor in the 
decline of the business enjoyed by this road, but it *s still op- 
erating at a profit to-day. 



THE HISTORY AND HONSTRUCTION OF THE POPF'3 CREEE 
BRANCH OF THE PEN?IS YLV^NIA RAILROAD, 

INTR STATION. 

Perhaps in no other industry is the romance and daring 
of the great engineering profession so magnificently demonstrated 
as in the far reaching sphere of railroading. Here the physical 
attributes of brawn and muscle have played a coordinated part with 
vision, courage, and ambition which together have accomplished 
feats never before witnessed in the history of the world. Progress 
and expansion have ridden hand ^n hand over the thousands of miles 
of iron roads laid down by the countless millions of men whose de- 
voted lives changed dreams into reality. To-day, when many are 
predicting the fading of the glories that once belonged to the 
railroads, it is only fair that we pause a moment while we prepare 
a retrospect of those early conditions and problems which formed 
the beginning of so vast an industry. 

Near the University of Maryland is located a compara- 
tively short branch of a great railroad system around which is 
entwined a glorious history. No better example of the methods, and 
even trices, employed by the various companies in their remarkable 
expansion could be found. Let us tr^ce, therefore, the evolution 
of what is now known as the "PoDe's Creek Branch of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad" . 

RAILROAD SERVICE BETWESH TASKING? ON AND BALTIMORE 
IN T'TS 50'S. 

Prior to the year 1850, and for seven 1 ye^rs later, the 



-2- 



Balt Ignore and Ohio Railroad was the only company ever to o-n, 
operate, -and maintain a railroad between the two flourishing 
cities of Washington, D.n and Rilti^ore, Md. indeed, their 
hansome monopoly proved so rich financially that in their endeav- 
ors to hold it the Baltimore and Ohio unwittingly followed an 
over zealous course which ultimately destroyed their monopoly and 
and permitted another system to establish transportation facilities 
between the two cities, 

Sven before its line was completed between Harrisburg, 
Pa, and Pittsburgh, Pa. the Pennsylvania Railroad CoT?an- was 
looking forward to carrying to Baltimore and the '.^outh the trade 
from the West which was naturally dun there, and made every possi- 
ble effort in that direction with the S'jsa iehanna Railroad and Ha 
successor, the Northern Central Railway Company. But nothing of a 
satisfactory nature could be accomplished until the latter company 
had passed into the control of the Pennsylvania, when the Pennsyl- 
vania P*ilT»oart gained the control of the Northern Centrnl Railway 
a very satisfactory connection with the business interests of 
Baltimore was secured. However, since access to the National Capi- 
tal was via the Washington Branch of the Baltimore ^nd Ohio Rail- 
road, and the management of the latter unfriendly, a formidable 
barrier was presented to future progress in a southerly direction 

THE BALTIMORE 1 AKD Q4I0 RAILROAD RSFrjJZS TO ;uOPRR4TE 
WITH TH3 NORTHERN CENTRAL Ra tt .WAY. 



-5- 



It was at this time tkat the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
committed a aeries of errors which finally destroyed thei" monopoly 
between Baltimore and Washington and caused the competitive system 
to be introduced between two great companies for the rontrol of the 
transportation business of the South. Instead of cooperating with 
the Northern Central Railway, later controlled by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad (Torapany, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company adopted 
an arbitrary coarse relative to the Interchange of travel and traffic • 
and threw ail kinds of obstacles in the tot of the northern Central 
transacting business with Washington City, 

"It refused to sell through tickets, or check baggage 
through from there (Washington) to points on or via Northern Cen- 
tral, or to accept such going thru, and so arranged its schedules 
that connections were rendered uncertain. It made rites of freight 
on the latter* s traffic that were really prohibitory. To overcome 
to some degree the annoyance their patrons were put to, the North- 
ern Central management arranged, as their southbound trains approach- 
ed Baltimore, to hand thru passengers destined to Washington, md 
who held through tickets, a small envelope containing cash sufficient 
to pay for their transfer through Baltimore, and to purchase a local 
Baltimore and Ohio ticket to Washington. The envelope contained 
also an explanation why the company and the passengers were put to 
this trouble." 

Naturally, a policy of this nature caused the "Pennsylvania 
Railroad to seek a new and independent route to Washington and the 



-4- 



South. Several other factors aided the company in their project 
among which were the tightening chains of a railroad autocracy 
which were beginning to be felt by Baltimore, and the necessity 
for a railroad through Southern Haryland which would enable the 
people to reach the cities of Washington and Baltimore with their 
products. 

A RAILROAD THROUGH SOUTHERB IUBZUBD 13 PROPOSED, 

The planters of the lower counties of Maryland, ^nd 
especially those of Prince George's, were particularly anxiou« 
to have constructed a railroad ^hich would connect Baltimore on 
ths north and the Potomac River on the south Sentiment for this 
construction was so strong that a movement w^s started for the 
purpose of organizing a stock company which would make such a 
project possible. Among the earliest and most zealous advocates 
of the enterprise 'vere Colonel ''illiam D Bowie, Robert Bowie, of 
nedar Hill, and General T. F. Bowie. Mr Robert Bowie was perhaps 
the most active of this group. He traveled through the lower 
counties making speeches, attending meetings, and in every possible 
way presenting inducements which would interest men of means in the 
scheme. He was ably assisted by Walter W. f. Bowie, whose elo- 
quent speeches and gifted pen (his nom de plume was *' Patuxent 
Planter") contributed no little to fie earlier success of the or- 
ganizers. As a result of their efforts a stock company was finally 
organized. At this time General Thomas "P. Bowie was the recognized 
leader of the Southern Maryland bar, and he aided the newly formed 



-5- 



corapany by contributing his- legal experience and influence in the. 
halls of legislation. The outgrowth of all this was the formation 
of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company, two of whose char- 
ter members were Walter W. W. Bowie and Thomas F. Bowie. Among the 
directors elected were Colonel William D. Bowie and his son, Oden 
Bowie. The last named, young, energetic, and possessing withal, 
sound judgement, was selected as president of the new ro^d. 

Tbe Civil War followed almost immediately and neither 
money nor men to build the road could be obtained until peace again 
had settled over tbe distracted region. But President Bowie had 
the company's interests at heart and upon the cessation of hostili- 
ties again brought the project before the public. Oden Bowie fre- 
quently visited the capitalists of the north. He approached John 
W. Garrett, President of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, 
but meeting with a cold reception from that official, at tbe In- 
stance of John B. Clark,, of Missouri, visited Colonel Thomas A, 
S^ott, of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, whote alertness caused 
him to grasp the situation, and led to his securing the control of 
the charter. Oden Bowie lived to see his pet scheme triumph be- 
yond his most sanguine expectations and the Board of Directors 
continued to elect him President of the Company each year until 
his death in 1394. 

A CHARTER FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OP ft, RAILROAD FROM 
BALTIMORE TO SOOTHERS MARYLAND 15 GRANTED. 



-6- 



Qn the sixth day of May, In the ye3V 1853, the Governor 
of Maryland approved a charter which authorized the construct inn 

of a railroad frora some suitable r>oint In or near the elty of 
Baltimore, and through or near Upper Marlboro and Port Tobacco to 
the Potomac River bet-ween Liverpool Point and the mouth of St. 
Mary's River, and the right to construct branches not exceeding 
twenty miles In length. It was the charter of which Colonel 3cott 
later gained control. Under the terms of the charter the road was 
to be commenced in six and finished In ten years, -with a capital 
stock fixed at $1,000,000. Before the incorporation of the com- 
pany could become effective, the charter provided that 2500 shares 
had to be subscribed for. The tlm« limit for securing the enabling 
subscriptions was set at five years from the time the Commissioners 
who were named in the Act effected their organization. On March 
10, 1854, the Act was amended so that the capital w^s divided into 
2000 shares at par value of $50-00 each, and made 1000 a*? the num- 
ber of shares to be subscribed as the ^ondtlion precedent to the 
incorporation of the e-cmnany. & further amendment, passed Mar«h 
10, 1856, provided for the commencement of the work to be made on 
or before March 10, i860, and completed -vlthln four years of that 
time, fin February 17. 1860, the tiiie limit was extended; the com- 
mencement to March 10, 1870, and completion to within four years 
thereafter. 

The distance from Baltimore to Pope's Creek is about 
seventy-three miles; the distance frora Bowie to Washington is 



-7.- 



about eighteen iilles. Thus, when the construction of this road 
was begun In 1868 by the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company, 
the railroad was being built to Pope' 3 Creek and a "branch" eighteen 
miles long was being constructed from Bowie to Washington. So it 
ia seen from this that what Is now part of the main line of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad between Bowie and Washington was originally 
built as a "branch" of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad. On 
July 2, 1872, the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad was, with the ex- 
ception of the tunnel in Baltimore, completed and placed In service 
between the latter city and Washington. The tunnel was not com- 
pleted and opened for traffic until June 29, 1873, at which time 
the road f^om Bowie to Pope's Greek, a distance of <*bout forty- 
eight miles, was also completed and placed In operation. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD SEEKS CONTROL OE T'lE 
BALTIMORE AND POTOMAC RAILROAD. 

Thus far in the history of the development of the 
Pope's Creek Railway it has been emphasized that the Pennsylvania 
Railroad was the power behind the organisation Then followed a 
long series of mergers and stock manipulations which some thirty 
years later gave undisputed control to the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road of a right-of-way from Washington to Philadelphia via Balti- 
more. In 1873 i the year in which the road from Bowie to Pope's 
Creek was opened to traffic, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
was the owner of 36,572 shares of tie Capital Stock of the Balti- 



-7.- 



about eighteen miles. Thus, when the construction of this road 
was begun in 1868 by the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company, 
the railroad was "being built to Pope's Creek and a "branch" eighteen 
miles long was being constructed from Bowie to Washington. So It 
Is seen from this that what is now part of the mala line of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad between Bowie and ^ashinpton was originally 
built as a "branch" of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad, On 
July 2, 1872, the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad was, with the ex- 
ception of the tunnel in Baltimore, completed and placed in service 
between the latter city and Washington. The tunnel was not com- 
pleted and opened for traffic until June 2 9, 1873, at which time 
the road f>»om Bowie to Pope's Creek, a distance of about forty - 
eight miles, was also completed and placed in operation. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD SEEKS CONTROL OF THE 
BALTIMORE AND POTOMAC RAILROAD, 

Thus far in the history of the development of the 
Pope's Creek Railway It has been emphasized that the Pennsylvania 
Railroad was the power behind the organization Then followed a 
long series of mergers and stock manipulations which some thirty 
years later gave undisputed control to the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road of a right-of-way from Washington to Philadelphia via Balti- 
more. In 1873 i the year in which the road from Bowie to Pope*s 
Creek was opened to traffic, the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
was the owner of 36,57? shares of the Capital Stock of the Balti- 



-8- 



more and Potomac Railroad Company, which had cost it *876,880, 
and on which the committee placed a nominal value of 51.00 per 
share. The entire receipts of that road in 1873 were, it w?s 
stated, only $381,536.73, and its net earnings 169.93, so that 
for a number of years it could not "be expected to do anything 
more than pay the interest on Its $4,500,000 of 6% mortgage bonds. 
It was pointed out, at this time, that the entire business of th» 
well established Baltimore and Ohio Railroad between Baltimore 
and Washington had not reached $500,000 in any one year since the 
termination of the ^ivil War. It must be kept in mind that the 
figures for the earnings of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad 
include the entire system from Baltimore to Pope's Creek and the 
"branch" from Bowie to Washington. Figures on the earnings for 
the present Pope's Creek Branch from Bowie to Pope's Creek are 
not available for this reason. It must be pointed out, however, 
that for many years the road from Bowie through Southern Maryland 
to Pope* 3 Creek did a very profitable business. 

This section of the state was devoted principally to 
the raising of tobacco, corn, wheat and fruits. Long freight 
trains hauled tons of supplies to the stations along the way and 
returned heavily laden with the rich produce of the planters. For 
many yeara this .road furnished the only raenns of transportation 
for the natives to Baltimore and Washington, and in its heyday 
as many as ten passenger trains per day made the 48 mile run. It 
is not amazing, then, that the Pennsylvania Railroad wts desirous 



-,9- 



of obtaining absolute control of this road. 

The total cost of the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad 
wis represented by the Issue of securities to the amount of 
§9,888,736, or over $107,000 per mile including the tunnel under 
the city of Baltimore consisting of $3,503,900 of stock, $4,500, 
000 of bonds and a floating debt of $1,884,836. The Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company owned $1,3? 8, 600 of this stock and jointly 
guaranteed the bonds with the Northern Central Railway Company. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD 91 TNS CONTROL 0? THE 
BALTIMORE AND POTOMAC RAILROAD. 

In March, 1901, a 33-1/3$ allotment of capital stock 
was made by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at $60.00 per share, 
resulting In the addition of $50,500,800, par value, to the out- 
standing capital stock. This waB the first time in the history 
of the company that it sold its stock at a premium, and it was 
the largest issue It had made up to that time. The premium rea- 
lized amounted to over $10,000,000, The proceeds received from 
this allotment were used for the purpose of meeting maturing obli- 
gations, to provide capital for the construction and equipment ex- 
penditures on the company's lines, and for other proper corporate 
purposes. A portion of the proceeds from the foregoing sale of 
capital stock of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company was used for 
the purpose of acauirlng the remaining stock in the Philadelphia, 
Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad Company not already owned by 



-10- 



the former company. It already held over 90£. of Its capital 
stock, and, In conjunction with the Northern Central Railroad 
Company, owned all the stock of the Baltimore and Potomac Rail- 
road Company. On November 1, 19Q2, the Philadelphia, Wilmington 
and Baltimore Railroad and the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad 
companies were merged and consolidated Into a corporation known 
as the Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad Company, 
thua placing under one ownership the line between Philadelphia 
»nd Washington. Since the capital stock of this company was 
practically all owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company th* 
long cherished independent route from Philadelphia to Washington 
was realized. 

THS FSSSB8T FOFS'S CREEK BRANCH OF THE 
PENNS YLVAHIA RA ILR OA D. 

Thus far the events of the past have been chronologi- 
cally reported in order to clearly illustrate the gigantic part 
that the little railroad from Bowie to Pope's Creek has played In 
the expansion of the great Pennsylvania Railroad System. It is 
hard to realize, as one watches, the lone train that makes the 
trip each week day, that without the granting of the original char- 
ter to the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Company the Nation's 
Capital would be deprived of the service of a great transportation 
company. 

To say that the advent of the motor truck has decreased 



-li- 



the amount of business enjoyed -by the Pope* a Creek Branch would 
be minimizing the damage that has been done. In place of the sev- 
eral trains formerly operated over the road there is but one to -day. 
It Is a combination freight and passenger train which travels to 
Pope's Creek In the morning and returns In the evening. Ten to 
fifteen freight cars with one combination passenger and baggnge car 
pulled by a single locomotive is the average train operated at the 
present time. The tremendous amount of tobacco formerly hauled 
by the railroad has been entirely lost to the trucking companies. 
In fairness to the railroad company it must be admitted that the 
present basis of completion between the railroad and trucking 
agencies discriminates in favor of the latter. The railroads form 
the greatest individual group of taxpayers in the nation. They 
have built and maintained their own private roads for years, yet, 
the trucking companies are allowed to operate over roads built by 
the taxes of the individual man. Little, if any, extra taxation 
is placed upon the various trucking agencies. For thi* reason 
they are able to haul the producer's tobacco at a far lower rate 
than the railroad couid ever hope to attain. Until this condition 
is remedied the railroad will never be able to regain one of Its 
chief sources of revenue. 

Despite the decrease In business the road is still 
showing a net profit for its operation, The chief freight now 
hauled over the road consists almost entirely of farm machinery, 
automobiles, and farm supplies with a small amount of food stuffs 



*12- 



which the farmers of that area are unable to grow. A mail con- 
tract ia still enjoyed by the company. 

Because of the schedule of operation used on the road 
no signal equipment Is necessary. All train operation is direct- 
ed by telephone from Bowie. The road is divided into five blocks 
and at the principal station In each block the conductor phones 
to Bowie for his orders before proceeding. Under the terms of 
the charter the Pennsylvania Railroad must continue to maintain 
train service over the Pope's Creek Branch as long as it continues 
service between Washington and Baltimore, for in the eyes of the 
law this little branch is still the main line of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad. Although a track crew is employed whose job is to main- 
tain the track In good serviceable condition the present equip- 
ment is badly in need of repair. Several of the photographs 
accompanying this report will substantiate that statement. 

The history of this little road Is a clear explanation 
of the rise of the powerful railroad trusts. Indeed, problem* 
which closely parallel its own may be found present in other com- 
panies throughout the country. Present conditions undoubtedly 
point to a decline in the prominence enjoyed by the railroads in 
the transportation industry but the glorious history entwining 
their rise and expansion will never be displaced. 




THE BEG INNING OF THE POPE'S CREEK 
BRANCH OP THIS PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD 
AT THE 307 IE JUNCTION. 







LOOKING SOUTH JUST OUTSIDE OF BOTTE. 



E* 



^JfekJLi 







ran 



^Mm^r- 



A SECTION OF THE ROAD BETWEEN BOW IS 
AND MARLBORO. NOTICE THE GRA3S 
GROWING BETWEEN THE TIES. 




THE GRADE GROSSING AT M4RLB0R0. 




AN OLD TRESTLE NEAR THE MARLBORO 
STATION. 



1 




LOOKING NORTH PROM THE TRESTLE. 




LOOKING NORTH AT THE MARLBORO STATION 
SHOWING THE GRADE-CROSSING. 




■ 



THE STATION AT MARLBORO, 




THE SWITCHING ARRANGEMENT U33D TO 
TURK THE LOCOMOTIVE AT POPE*S 
CREEK* 




LOOKING NORTH FROM THE POPE'S 
CREEK " SARir . 




THE STATION AT POPS* 3 3R53K. 




"THE END OF THE LINEf . THE POTOMAC 
RIVER 15 SEEN IN THE FOREGROUND. 




*l 



THE STATION AT LA PLATA 




LOOKING SOUTH ,J HO"! TH? LA PLATA 
STATION. 




AN OLD TATSR TOWER AT COX. 
THIS STATION IS BETWEEN LA 
PLATA AND POPS 1 3 r!R3EK. 




THE STATION AT COX, SHOWING THE 
WATER TOTER IN THE DISTANCE. 





POPE'S CREEK BRANCH 


Explanation of Character*. 

Stops week-days only, 

f Stops only on signal or notice to 
Agent or Conductor to receive 

or discharge passengers. 

H Will not run Nov, 24, Dee. 26, 
Jan. 2 or Feb. 22, 

k Stops Saturdays only. 

y Stops daily except Sundays and 

holidays, 

KB No Baggage Service, 

The Pennsylvania Railroad is 

not responsible for errors in time 
tables, nor for inconvenience or 

damage resulting from delayed trains 
or failure to make connections. The ,, 
schedules shown herein are subject 
to change without notice. 

The time from 12.01 A. M. to 12 
o'clock, noon, inclusive, is indicated 
by light-face type; from 12,01 P. M. 
to 12 o'clock, midnight, inclusive, 
by heavy-Face type. 


6131 
Week- 
days 
H 


Miles 




Week- 
days 
H 

P M 

5 ID 

4 34 

5 on 

f 440 

~4~20 

4 10 

4 00 

f 3 50 

f 3 45 

3 30 
f 3 01 
1 2 56 
f 2 61 

2 4:5 

f 2 25 
f 2 17 
1 2 DO 

f 1 34 
M 03 
12 65 
M2 45 
12 30 
r u 


AH 

735 

8 10 




Leave Arrive 
.Baltimore, Md. (Pcnna. Sta.)._. 
Ar. ..Bowie, Md.— Lv. 


7 45 


Lv...Wash.. D. C. (Un. Sta.J.Ar. 
Ar. ...... ..Bowie, Md. .__ Lv. 


f 3 06 








825 

a 37 


.0 
3.1 

6,1 
6.S 

IO.0 
Xt.7 


Lv. ' Bowie, Md. Ar. 


8 48 


_MuIlikin. Md. 


f 8 54 


...Hall. Mr], 


( 9 01 






i HiH, Md 






9 25 


13.3 
WS 
lO.J 
22.0 
ISO 




f 9 33 




( S 43 




f 9 55 




10 20 




in as 


27.3 
31-1 
340 


Osborne, Xfd 


HO 45 


..Waldorf, Md. . 


(11 10 


Whit^ Plain. Md, 






fll 35 


33.3 
40-3 
43 4 

45.2 
48.7 


La Plata. Md.. , 


111 41 
111 54 
H2 05 
12 10 

l' M 


.. Port Tobacco, Md 

.Cox, Md. 


Pope's Creek, Md. 

Arrivi Leave 



THE PRESENT SCHEDULE OF TRAIN OPERATION 
PLACED IN EFFECT OCTOBER 30, 1952 .