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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

20                 CHARLES  STEWART PARNELL             [18
the surface. Thus in the summer of 1883 a vacanc occurred in the representation of Monaghan. Parii* at once seized the opportunity to invade the North ar to bombard the strongholds of Unionism. The tenan farmers of Monaghan cared little for Home Rul They cared much for the land. Parnell according sent Mr. Healy—the hero of the Land Act of 1881— storm the Ulster citadel. He himself appeared upc the scene, and plunged into the struggle with chara teristic clan. The following incident of the campai^ showTs that Pamell's superstitious instincts did n desert him, even in the heat of the battle.
'The night before the polling/ says Mr. Heal 4 we found ourselves in the comfortable hotel at Cast! blayney, exhausted by dusty driving and incessa: speaking through a long summer day. We order dinner and were shown to our rooms. The roor adjoined, and immediately after closing my door heard Parnell's voice in the corridor ordering his apai ment to be changed. Apparently there was a difficul about this, as the hotel wras crowded for the electi< next day. Knowing he was not in the least a stick] for luxury or hard to please about a room, I went o to ask what wras the matter. There he was, standi in the passage opposite his bedroom door, with his b in his hand, evidently I chafing and very much put 01 "Look at that," said he, pointing to the number on 1 door. It was No. 13. " What a room to give m They are Tories, I suppose, and have done it < purpose." I laughed and said, "Take mine; let exchange." " If you sleep in that room," said he, " y will lose the election." I looked into it, and founc good roomy chamber, much better than the one allott to me, and I said so, pointing out that the " Tor] hand, it would be no easy tank to argue before an Irish-American audience that the use of force by Ireland, or by any other oppressed nation, for the recovery of its liberties would bo immoral.'