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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

2'2                 CIIAKLES  STEWART  PARNELL              [1883
on your sticks,' said Mr. Arclidale. ' Only for the police and soldiers/ exclaimed Major Saunderson, * those rebels would have been in the nearest river.' The Government proclaimed an Orange meeting at which Lord Eossmore was to preside. ' It is a great pity/ said his Lordship, referring to this action of the authorities, ' that the so-called Government of England stopped loyal men from assembling to uphold their institutions here, and had sent down a handful of soldiers whom we could eat up in a second or two if we thought fit. The Orangemen, if they liked, could be the Government themselves. I only wish they were allowed, and they would soon drive rebels like Parnell and his followers out of their sight.'
Despite Orange violence and Orange threats the Nationalists did their work in Ulster, and did it well, as the General Election of 1885 proved.1
Parnell himself ' lay low' after the Monaghan election, allowing his lieutenants to conduct the campaign in Ulster and elsewhere. He had for some time been in financial difficulties. The fact got abroad, and the people resolved to relieve him of his embarrassments. He told the story himself in his accustomed laconic style to the Special Commission: ' A mortgage on my estate was foreclosed, and I filed a petition for its sale. This fact, somehow or other, got into the newspapers, and the Irish people raised a collection for me to pay off the mortgage. The
1 ' Unfortunately, however,' said Mr. Trevelyan, then Irish Secretary, * the counter-demonstrations of the Orangemen were, to a great extent, demonstrations of armed men. At their last meeting at Dumore sackfuls of revolvers were left behind, close to the place of meeting. . . . The Orange meetings were bodies of armed men ... So far as the Government knew, it was not the custom of the Nationalists to go armed to their meetings until the bad example was set by the Orangemen.' Hansard. American Land League.