(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

*«KT. 37]                       DYNAMITE PLOTS                                  31
ness of these plots, occasionally hatched with utter indilTercncocvcn to the lives of the Nationalist members themselves. Had the attempt to destroy the Charing Cross Railway Station been successful, a score of Irish members who were stopping at the Charing Cross Hotel wcnild have been blown into eternity. It transpired at the trial of some of the dynamitards that a proposal had been made to throw a bomb into the House of Commons. ' I entered the House of Commons about this time/ said Mr. Harrington. ' I remember being in the Smoking-room one evening with Farnell and Lord Randolph Churchill. « Well, Parnell," said Lord "Randolph Churchill, referring to the dynamite trials, " I suppose you would object to havo a bomb thrown into the House1, of (•ominous. You would not like to be blown up, even by an Irishman/' "lam not so sure, of that," said Parnell, lt if the.re. were a eall of the ] louse." '
4 Mr. Pa.rnell/ asked the Attorney-Cloneral at the Varnell Commission, * you know that Haly|a convicted dynamitard'l at all events was tried Cor being a dyna-iuita.nl?' 4 Yes/ answered .Parnell, * he, was tried and convicted of having bombs in his pocket which, it was suggested, wore going to bo tlu'own on the floor of the House of Commons, which would probably have, had an equal efleet all round/
But what did Parnell think of the morality of dynamiteV lie did not think about it at all. He regarded the moral sermons preached by Hn^lish statesmen and publicists as the merest cant., and looked upon the * Times1' denunciations of the * Irish AVorld ' as a ease of the, pot calling the kettle, black. Morality was the last thing the English thought oŁ in, their dealings with "Ireland. Morality was the lasting was opposed to the Errington mission.knew, it was not the custom of the Nationalists to go armed to their meetings until the bad example was set by the Orangemen.'— Hansard. American Land League.