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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

32                 CHARLES  STEWART PAUNELL             [1884=
thing he thought of in his dealings with them. There are men who can readily argue themselves into the belief that whatever serves their purpose is moral-Such men could easily explain away the dynamite outrages to their own satisfaction. But Parnell's mind was too simple to indulge in the subtleties and refinements necessary for this achievement. He was content to call the dynamitards fools, and to laugh at the moral pretensions of the House of Commons. For the rest, he concentrated all his energies upon the main, purpose of bringing the British statesmen to theixr bearings oil the question of Ireland. He had no f aittx in an English party. He advised his fellow-countrymen to trust in none. Speaking at the St. Patrick's Day celebration in London in 1884, he said: ' I have always endeavoured to teach my countrymen, whether: at home or abroad, the lesson of self-reliance. I do not depend upon any English political party. I shonldL advise you not to depend upon any such party. I do not depend upon the good wishes of any section of the English. Some people desire to rely on the English, democracy—they look for a great future movement; among the English democracy; but I have never* known any important section of any country which has assumed the government of another country to awaken, to the real necessities of the position until compelled to do so. Therefore I say, do not rely upon any English. party; do not rely even upon the great English, democracy, however well disposed they may bo towards your claims; but rely upon yourselves., upon the great power which you have in every industrial centre in England and Scotland, npon the devotion of the sea-divided Gael, whether it; be under the southern cross or beyond the widewas opposed to the Errington mission.knew, it was not the custom of the Nationalists to go armed to their meetings until the bad example was set by the Orangemen.'— Hansard. American Land League.