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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

34                 CHARLES  STEWART PARNELL             [1884
CHAPTEE   XVI
WOOING  PARNELL
I HAVE given one instance—the Monaghan election__of
how quickly Parnell, though ' submerged' during the years 1883 and 1884, could come to the surface when his presence was necessary. I shall give another. \Ve have seen that in 1882 Davitt wished to make Land Nationalisation a plank in the National League platform, and that Parnell would not allow it. Davitt still adhered to his views, and, not unfairly, endeavoured in private and public to enforce them. Parnell—shrinking from public controversy with a colleague, yet fearing that perhaps even a small section of the people might accept the principle of Land Nationalisation and that a division would thus be caused in the Nationalist ranks—felt himself constrained to make a public declaration on the subject. Speaking at Drogheda on April 15,1884, he said : (It is necessary for me to take advantage of this occasion to warn you against elements of future difficulty—elements of possible future difficulty, and possibilities of grave disunion in our ranks, which may be obviated by a timely declaration. I refer to the project termed the nationalisation of the land, and in dealing with this question I don't wish to important section of any country which has assumed the government of another country to awaken, to the real necessities of the position until compelled to do so. Therefore I say, do not rely upon any English. party; do not rely even upon the great English, democracy, however well disposed they may bo towards your claims; but rely upon yourselves., upon the great power which you have in every industrial centre in England and Scotland, npon the devotion of the sea-divided Gael, whether it; be under the southern cross or beyond the widewas opposed to the Errington mission.knew, it was not the custom of the Nationalists to go armed to their meetings until the bad example was set by the Orangemen.'— Hansard. American Land League.