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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

yET. 39]                   LOUD CARNARVON                             51
for repajoneiit of the purchase money, at the rate of 4 per cent., and 5,000,0002. were taken from the surplus fund of the Irish Disestablished Church and set aside for the purposes of the Act. But the most remarkable development of the Tory Irish ' alliance ' has yet to be unfolded.
In the summer of 1885 Lord Carnarvon invited Parnell to meet him to discuss the affairs of Ireland, Mr. Justin McCarthy shall begin this story:
' Some time in the summer of 1885 Howard Vincent came to me in the House of Commons and said that Lord Carnarvon wished to have a talk with Parnell about Ireland. Vincent asked if an interview could be arranged. I said that Parnell wras a difficult man to see, and that I doubted if it could be arranged.
1 Vincent said that the interview could take place at his house, and that everything would be managed very quietly; he would keep all the servants out of the way, and open the door himself. I promised to see Parnell and to put the matter before him. I did see Parnell, and I told him all that Howard Vincent had said. Parnell replied : " I will see Lord Carnarvon at his own house if he wishes to see me. There must be no mystery." I told this to Vincent, and it was finally settled that I should see Lord Carnarvon first. I called on Lord Carnarvon at his own house. He opened the conversation, saying he wished to talk about Ireland and to hear ParnelPs views. He asked me if there were any suggestions about the government of the country which I would like to make. I said: "The first suggestion, Lord Carnarvon, I would like to offer is that you should go about without a military escort and without detectives. Trust the people/*
1 He answered: " I have made up my mind on that
E   2                                     Bed the one party, and made* he other dependent on his will. It was check for Lord Salisbury, and checkmate for Mr. by the Orangemen.' Hansard. American Land League.