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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

. 39]      THE  CARNARVON CONTROVERSY                 65*
Liberals, which I considered insensate in a popular leader, and took the ground that he would help the new Government to the best of his ability at the elections and in Parliament provided they took up the Home liule question, at least to the extent of promising an inquiry, I would go to Ireland and open negotiations with Lord Carnarvon which Parnell might confirm later. Gray asked if my recent article in the ' National Review/ appealing to the Conservative party to carry Home Eule, was written in concert with any Conservatives. Yes, I said, I had consulted some Conservatives in the House of Commons on the subject, and the article was sent to the ' National Keview,' of whose editor I knew nothing, by Lord Carnarvon. Before separating I urged on Parnell and Gray the need of getting the Tories to give a Catholic University to Ireland. Parnell demanded if there were any great need of it. Yes, I said, vital need. The Scotch had excellent schools and colleges, and they beat the Irish everywhere in the battle of life. This was very significant in the Colonies, and Gray would tell him that in Ireland the business of his large office was managed by a Scotch Presbyterian, and that James Duffy's publishing establishment was managed by another Scotch Presbyterian ; not certainly that they preferred Scotch Presbyterians, but that they were of opinion that they could not get so suitable men at home. Gray assented, and Parnell said that if it could be done it ought to be done. I agreed to go to Ireland immediately, and I said I would open the business by a public letter to Lord Carnarvon on the justice and policy of conceding Home Eule.
I must  now   state   the grounds   upon   which I counted on the assistance of Lord Carnarvon.   During
VOL. II.                                                                         F«»r ili«^ .iiiipj«»ri al'Miit t*i Jn^ given to them. He .said flu? n«'W (5i.»Vrrnjii«-Jit \vu*^ not going to renew i*Wntrr*j* C*iw*ivinii lull, l«-v*'mJ that In* did not know what they utwliuiril. I rrjih«-,| that ho owyht to know ; lie miw liciiiml U-fMtv i*iiiiuiun^ the Biipport of Irif'ih vutrni for c;iniiuUtr-i \vlm inact that the government consisted of a committee of three.