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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

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Me. 4S]                PARNELL'S PROPOSALS
the terms of this memorandum should not be disclosed to any other person until after the introduction of the Home Eule Bill, and not then unless this Bill failed to carry out those terms; but.that if the Bill were satisfactory I should be permitted to publish the memorandum after the passing of the former into law. I would agree that instead of adopting the limit of two years as the period in which the constabulary should be disarmed and turned into a civil force, and handed over to the Irish Executive, the term might be extended to five years ; but I regard the fixing of some term of years for this in the Bill of the most vital importance. I also send you the inclosed copy of the clause of the Bill of 1886 relating to the Metropolitan Police and Constabulary. I do not think it necessary to insist upon the charge for the latter during the period of probation being paid out of the Imperial funds, as I do not wish to increase Mr. Gladstone's difficulties.
'P.S.—It should be noted that Gladstone can scarcely refuse to communicate with Mr. McCarthy on these subjects, as, in his letter to the delegates, he stated that as soon as the question of the leadership of the party was settled he would be in a position to open confidential communications again, and he has publicly acknowledged Mr. McCarthy's election as valid/
It will be seen by this letter that Parnell simply held the ground which he had taken up in Committee Boom 15. There he had said : l If you sell me, see that you get value.'
The value he suggested was satisfactory assurances from the Liberal party on the subjects of them of thtwo proposals. "Ah, now," he? said, ** wo have Homo-thing Kpeetfu* to go upon. Let O'Brien come back.1' • nt tho t'ourt !!tiii«*i during that pnxtoHH who futoiutul to In* In butter huimutr or who look<ul anxious though Itu waUrlu«l ovo vory carefully twid                   on tlianlurt, than'it^ was a                                  andry to nil} you