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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

314                CHARLES STEWART PARNELL            [1891
land and the police. The only new condition whicb-he imported was, that he and Mr. O'Brien should alone be the judges of the satisfactoriness of th0 Liberal assurances. To this letter Mr. O'Brier* replied:
Mr. O'Brien to Parnell
«4th, 1st, '91
' MY DEAE ME. PAENELL,—I received your letter and have given as much thought as I was able to tha important proposal it contained. If, as on the first reading of your letter there seemed to be some likelihood, you were disposed to drop the objection to McCarthy's continuance in the chairmanship, th© new proposal would seem to diminish the difficulties of conciliating English opinion. If, however, your first determination on that point remains unchanged, the necessity which the Hawarden plan involves, oŁ employing McCarthy in a transaction so painful to himself personally would seem to me to raise a formidable obstacle to that form of securing the guarantees desired. I have been turning the matter over in my mind as to another way in which equally satisfactory results might be obtained, and when we meet in, Boulogne on Tuesday I hope to be able to submit it with sufficient definiteness to enable us to thrash it out with some prospect of an immediate and satisfactory agreement. Those who are bent on thwarting peace at any price are building great hopes upon delays or breakdowns of our Boulogne negotiations; but I am. beginning to entertain some real hope that with promptness and good feeling on both sides we may still be able to hit upon some agreement that will relieve the country from an appalling prospect, and*e subjects of them of thtwo proposals. "Ah, now," he? said, ** wo have Homo-thing Kpeetfu* to go upon. Let O'Brien come back.1' • nt tho t'ourt !!tiii«*i during that pnxtoHH who futoiutul to In* In butter huimutr or who look<ul anxious though Itu waUrlu«l ovo vory carefully twid                   on tlianlurt, than'it^ was a                                  andry to nil} you