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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

332                CHAELES  STEWART PAENELL            [1891
ignorant of these things. I have read very little, but I am smart, and can pick up information quickly. Whatever you tell me about O'Connell you will find I will remember/ I then told him the story of the Melbourne alliance, so far as I was able; pointing out how it had ended in 0'Council's plunging into repeal, and in the Liberals afterwards fighting shy of Irish questions until the Eenian outbreak. The upshot of the alliance, I said, was that O'Connell lost faith in the British Parliament, and the Liberals felt that they had burned their fingers over Ireland, and accordingly tried to keep clear of the subject in the future. ' I agree/ he said ; * an English alliance is no use. It is a mistake to negotiate with an Englishman. He knows the business better than you do. He has had better training, and he is sure, sooner or later, to get you on a bit of toast. You must keep within your own lines and be always ready to fight until you get what you want. I gained nothing by meeting Mr. Gladstone. I was no match for him. He got more out of rne than I ever got out of him.' ' Why,' I asked/ did you make a close alliance with the Liberals in 1886 ? ' ' Some change had to be made/ he answered. ' You see, they had come round to Home Eule. We could not go on fighting them as we did before their surrender.' ' But then, a close alliance was a mistake/ I said ; ' even a Liberal said to me that it would have been better for the Irish and the Liberals to have moved on parallel lines than on the same line.' ' I did not/ he answered, ' want a close alliance. I did not make a close alliance. I kept away from the Liberals as much as I could. You do not know how much they tried to get at me, how much I was worried. But I tried to keep away from them as much as I had ever done. I knew the danger of getting rr'ftftwl tt thfl bttlltwl afffiin. If \wy }iey, unit 1 <|tmti'il th Iln4 v*rMi*. I*urnoll tiiriKn! round ntnl i "Sing it* it.*1 Of nmrxtt ! rtiltwett* but hit kept {Hiking tit** it$ ttw I'Uw mil this litn**, Nnying: '* Hing It/1 iittcl n nuntht>r cf ffilltiw* rut ttin tihttforin,             Iw tnltn it, jttimui him. lUit 1 hcltl