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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

*886       CHAELES STEWAET PARNELL
been done for Ireland in my time has been done by Mr.
Gladstone—Gladstone plus Fenianism, and plies yon.'
We  then talked about the Fenians and  separation.
I said : ' Every Irish Nationalist would go for separation
if he thought he could get it; we are all Home Eulers
because we do not believe separation is possible/  After
a pause he said, showing no disposition to continue the
subject: ' I have never gone for separation.    I never
said I would.    The physical force men understand my
position very well.    I made it clear to them that I
would be satisfied with a Parliament, and that I believed
in our constitutional movement; but I also said that if
our constitutional movement failed, I could not then
stand in the way of any man who wished to go further
and to try other means.    That was the position I always
took up.   I have never changed, and I still believe in
our constitutional movement.    I believe that with our
own Parliament, if England does not meddle, we can
build up our country.'    I said: *------/ naming an old
Fenian, ' says that there has been too much land and too little nationality in your movement all the time.' 'Does he suggest/ rejoined Parnell, with a slight touch of sarcasm, ' that the land should have been neglected ?' No/ I rejoined, ' but he thinks that you allowed it to overshadow the National movement/
Parnell. 'That could not have been helped. Bemember the crisis of 1879, . There was distress and famine; the tenants rushed the movement. Besides, the claims of the tenants were just in themselves, and ought to have been taken up/ 'The Fenians/ I said, 'are the real Nationalist force in Ireland/ ' That is true/ he rejoined.
One of our last talks was about the Liberal leaders and the progress of Home Eule in England. Hel, atltling, 4 Almtmt all that has
1 Huppose liu thinks himself a great Irish representative. 1 could givci you cither          of the «ame kind.    Mostntnl i "Sing it* it.*1 Of nmrxtt ! rtiltwett* but hit kept {Hiking tit** it$ ttw I'Uw mil this litn**, Nnying: '* Hing It/1 iittcl n nuntht>r c»f ffilltiw* rut ttin tihttforin,             Iw t«»nlt»n it, jttimui him. lUit 1 hcltl