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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

306                CIIAHLES STEWAKT PARXELL
massive, and his step had lost something of its old elasticity. Yet when I entered the room he rose from the table at which he was seated near the window, and crossed to meet me with an activity which was wonderful in a man of his years. * I do not know/ he said, 4 that I have much to tell you about Parnell, but I will answer fully every question you ask/ Ho then sat in an armchair close to the firo, and I drew near him. He was very deaf, and leaned eagerly forward to hear what I had to ask or say. He seemed to feel a, keen interest in everything about Parnoll, and as ho recalled the events of the past eighteen years and talked about the Irish leader and the Irish movement one quickly forgot his years and became absorbed and delighted in his conversation. The face was lighted up by brilliant flashes of thought; the expression wan varied, bright, beautiful; he spoke with energy and vehemence, and with an intonation which showed that his voice still retained something of its old charm.
1 began the conversation by saying : * May I ask when you first discovered that tlioro wan anything remarkable in Parnell ? *
Mr. Gladstone, i I must begin by saying that I did not discover anything remarkable in Mr. Parnell until much later than 1 ought to have discovered it. But you know that I had retired from the leadership of the Liberal party about the time that Parnoll entered Parliament, and when 1 came back to public life my attention was absorbed by the Eastern Question, by Bulgaria, and I did not think much about Ireland. I do not think that Mr. Parnell or Irish matters much engaged my attention until we came back to Government in 1880, You see we thought that the Irish was settled* There was the Church Act and but, 1 think, when   it  reached Brighton Parnell was  dead.* Throughout Tiuwlay,   October   0,    '1 'arnell    suffered much.   The  rheumatic  pains flew  to  his  heart, ho        of the ame kind.    Mostntnl i "Sing it* it.*1 Of nmrxtt ! rtiltwett* but hit kept {Hiking tit** it$ ttw I'Uw mil this litn**, Nnying: '* Hing It/1 iittcl n nuntht>r cf ffilltiw* rut ttin tihttforin,             Iw tnltn it, jttimui him. lUit 1 hcltl