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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell - Ii"

358                 CHARLES  STEWART PARXELL
proceedings  had not  taken  place  there would be a Parliament in Ireland to-day.'
I said: l He suffered terribly during the last year of his life. The iron had entered his soul. I was with him constantly, and saw the agony of his mind, though he tried to keep it a secret from us all/
Mr. Gladstone. l Poor fellow! Ah ! if he were alive now I would do anything for him.'
' May I ask, "When did you first speak to Parnell ? ' Mr. Gladstone. 'Well, under very peculiar circumstances, and they illustrate what I mean when I speak of him as being unlike anyone I ever met. I was in the House of Commons, and it was in 1881, when, you know, we were at war. Parnell had made violent speeches in Ireland. He had stirred the people up to lawlessness. Forster had those speeches printed. He put them into my hands. I read them carefully. They made a deep impression on me, and I came down to the house and attacked Parnell. I think I made rather a strong speech (with a smile)—drew up rather a strong indictment against him, for some of the extracts were very bad. Well, he sat still all the time, wras quite immovable. He never interrupted me ; he never even made a gesture of dissent. I remember there wras one declaration of his which was outrageous in its lawlessness. I read it slowly and deliberately, and watched him the while. He never winced, while the House wras much moved. He listened attentively, courteously, but showed no feeling, no excitement, no concern. I sat down. He did not rise to reply. He looked as if he were the one individual in the House who was not a bit affected by what I said. The debate went on. After a time I walked out of the House. He rose from his seat, followed me, and coming up with much dignityut, 1 think, when   it  reached Brighton Parnell was  dead.* Throughout Tiuwlay,   October   0,    '1 'arnell    suffered much.   The  rheumatic  pains flew  to  his  heart, ho        of the «ame kind.    Mostntnl i "Sing it* it.*1 Of nmrxtt ! rtiltwett* but hit kept {Hiking tit** it$ ttw I'Uw mil this litn**, Nnying: '* Hing It/1 iittcl n nuntht>r c»f ffilltiw* rut ttin tihttforin,             Iw t«»nlt»n it, jttimui him. lUit 1 hcltl