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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell Vol - I"

170               CHARLES  STEWART PARNELL             [1878
Parnell also scored a success by causing the Mutiny Bill—which he again obstructed—to be referred to a select committee, a step which was followed by important reforms in the ensuing session. Altogether he had already proved to the House and to the country that he was a man with a future.
Outside Parliament he devoted himself industriously to the cause of Home Eule. As President of the Home Eule Confederation of Great Britain he attended regularly at the meetings of the executive body, and took a leading part in the transaction of its business.
' Parnell was an excellent chairman/ says the official of the Confederation on whose information I have already drawn. ' He used to rattle through the business with great speed. Faith, he allowed no obstruction in our work.'
' "Was he as pleasant a man to do business with as Butt ?}
Official. 'There was a great difference between them. Butt was genial and lovable. You did not feel you were doing business with him at all. I used often to go to his lodgings in London. He always received you with open arms; sat you down to a cup of tea, or a glass of whisky punch, and chatted away as if you had only called to spend a social evening. He was a delightful companion, so friendly, and so homely. He would crack a joke, tell a good story, and gossip away in the happiest style. I quite loved the old man. But Parnell was altogether different. He was certainly a very pleasant man to do business with, very quick at
formed for the purpose of holding examinations and granting exhibitions and prizes to students who passed in subjects of secondary education. A sum of 1,000,000?., taken from the Irish Church surplus, was devoted to the objects of the Board.