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Full text of "The Life Of Charles Stewart Parnell Vol - I"

^ET. 36]      ' FIGHT AND STICK TOGETHER'              371
in the country, speaking with studied moderation, and showing clearly that it was his wish to keep things :                quiet for the present. Alderman Eedmond, who travelled
with him by train to one of these meetings—from i               Waterford to Dungarvan and back—has given me the
following  note of  a conversation which took place t               between them:
I                     'I found Parnell a pleasant companion.    He did
i              not like talking, but he listened to you with  great
!                attention.    I said: " Mr. Parnell, how do you think
;                Home Eule is getting on ? "  " Very well," he answered.
;                "If the people pull steadily together we shall get it in
a few years."
' Alderman Redmond. " Surely,  Mr.  Parnell, the English people are strongly opposed to Home Eule. You will take a long time to bring them round." |                     ' Parnell. " They were strongly opposed to Catholic
Emancipation, but they had to come round in the end, !                O'Connell had nothing like our power; he stood almost
alone.    We have only to fight and stick together, and we will win.    We must not yield an inch.   You get ^              nothing from the English by yielding."
"Alderman Eedmond.   "But, Mr. Parnell,  some ,               Pe°ple think that we are not fit for Home Eule, that we
!               would misuse it.    They say all this in the North."
1                     ' Parnell. " The North certainly show us a bad ex-
f               ample, for they exclude Catholics from all power there.
i               There might be difficulties in working Home Eule at
*               first, but the good sense of the country would make
'               things right after a time.   Even the fears of the North
|               would soon be set at rest."
!                    'Alderman   Redmond.   "How   would   you   make
l               Ireland prosper under Home Eule ? "
!                    ( Parnell (laughing). " Well, I will ask you another
'                                                                                                      BB2