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Full text of "The Loom Of Language"

Accidence— Tlie Table Manners of Language   127

given in a dictionary, (ft) flexional derivatives which stall affect the
meaning of a statement.

To the first class belong the personal pronouns It should be our
fiist task to memorize them, because we have to use them constantly,
and because they often have case-forms which are not recognizably like
the dictionary word. Fortunately they are not numerous. The accom-
panying tables give their equivalents in the Teutonic languages Their
Romance equivalents are on pp 331, 332, 363, 369, 372 In subsequent
chapters the Loom will set out the minimum of grammar necessary for
the reader who wants to get a reading or writing knowledge of them.

TEUTONIC POSSESSIVES*

LNGLISH
	SWEDISH
	DANISH
	DUTCH
	GERMAN

my
	mm (etc )
		myn \
	mein (etc )

(thy)
	Dm (etc )
		JWU)
	dein (etc )

our
	vdr (etc )
	vor (etc )
	onze 01 ons (n)
	unser (etc )

your
	Ei (etc )
	De?cs
	Uw
	Ihr (etc )

his
	hans
		zijn
	sera (etc )

her
	hermes
	hendes
	haar
	ihr (etc )

its
	dess
	dens
	zijn
	sein (etc )

their
	deras
	deres
	hnn
	ihr (etc )


	Those italicized have neuter
		fLike other adjec-
	These have case


	singular and   plural forms
		tives   take  -e  in
	as well as gender


	min-mma or mit-minr, van-
		plural
	andnumberforms


	vai a or oort-vore The form
		
	(p   295) and are


	given is  the common sin-
		
	declined like ein>


	gular   Dm and Er behave
		
	e g unser, unsere.


	like mm and var respectively
		
	unser   The form


	
		
	given is the masc


	
		
	nomin sing

* Swedish and Danish have no special mine, ours, etc , forms German has
a triple set of possessive pronouns Two of them follow the declension of the
weak adjective and are used after the definite article (e g der nmnige or del
meine), the third behaves like the strong adjective and appears when nor pre-
ceded by der> d^e, das (e g memer* mewe, meinei)
When you have memorized the pronouns m their appropriate situa-
tions, concentrate on the following. Fust, leain the plural forms of the
noun, because the difference between one dollar and several dollars is
often important. Then leain to recognise and to recall the helpei verbs,
such as the equivalents of shall, will, have, and w, etc ^ how to use them,
and with what forms of other verbs (participles or infinitive) they keep