(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Loom Of Language"

240

The Loom of Language

be understood unless we indicated our wishes in writing Sometimes
our own pronunciation of a French loan-word (e g damage) is nearer to
the original than that of a Frenchman to-day Modern French has
discarded many words which survive in English,, c g able, bacon, chattel^
mischief^ mce, noise, nunance> pledge, plenty, random, remember, level.
English is thus a museum in which relics of Old and Middle French
are exhibited, but English words of Latin origin derived from bor-
rowed French words are far less numerous than English words coined
directly from Latin roots, and these are the woids which lighten our

IATIN
	FRFNCH
	

	(a) Older
	(b) Newer

causa
	cnosr     (Thing)
	cause           (cause)

calculo
	CATtlOU   (pebble)
	calcul          (calculus)

calce
	criAUX     (lime)
	caique          (tracing)

carta
	CHAKIE    (charter)
	carte            (curd)

captivo
	ctnfinp    (jpwty> weak)
	captif ,        (captive)

factione
	FACQN     (tfyle)
	faction         (faction)

fabnca
	i ORGF      (smithy)
	f abnque       ( factory)

fragih
	IRpLB        (ftatl)
	iragilc          (ft agile)

hospitale
	H6llL      (hotel,
	hopital         (hospital)


	mansion)
	

parabola
	PAROLL      (speech)
	paiabole      (parable)

pietate
	PITlú          (frtv)
	pi&6            (pwty)

praedicatore
	PRtattiUR (preacher)
	pr<5dicateui (prcachci)

questionc
	QUBTE       (quest)
	question      (question}

rigido
	RAIDE         (stiff}
	ngide           (rigid)

redemptione
	RAN9ON    (ransom)
	redemption (redemption}

task in learning a Romance language such as Spanish, To take full
advantage of our Latin legacy we therefore need to know a little about
how the pronunciation of Latin changed when it split up into the
daughter dialects which are now spoken, and how the sound-changes
are reflected in the spelling of each
There are several signposts by which English words of Latin or
French origin can be recognized, We have already come across one of
them (C for the k sound) in Chapter II. Another important one is the
combination -TI~ for the sound represented by sh in words of Teutonic
parentage. The following is a list of some of the most reliable dues:
(i) The combinations CT, TI (pronounced sh) and SC, e,g, action
an<J scale,